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  1. Oct 2020
    1. I guess this brings us to the Indieweb where you can probably still call each other Netizens and bemoan the death of RSS. Even though it’s been around since 2013, I see a spark of hope in this ragtag group of HTMLists. (Why isn’t “ragtag” some kind of microformat for the homeless?)

      I love this!

    1. Heather Staines1 month agoWould you consider metadata to be a form of annotation? Annotation for machines?Remi Kalir1 month agoYes, absolutely, metadata is a form of annotation. The MIT Press EKS volume “Metadata” is included in our Further Readings section. And the relationship between human-machine annotation, as well as automated annotation, is a topic we pick up in Chapter 7. Do you see additional opportunities for us to more explicitly discuss metadata as a form of annotation?

      It’s a great meta meta example, but the IndieWeb movement uses microformats to mark up portions of web pages with metadata that gives machines the idea of the semantics of a particular post. Thus, I could reply to this web page with a traditional social media “like” as a means of annotating it on my own website. The microformat “u-like-of” would be added to my page’s metadata that allows the web page I’m replying to to read that like intent and potentially display it—though traditionally they’re shown under the text in question.

    1. I’m shocked and amazed that we still struggle to find materials.

      Something about this sentence and its lead up reminds of this particularly great section of the Microformats wiki about why not email: http://microformats.org/wiki/wiki-better-than-email

    1. they wrote a Chrome plugin that would redact the information as it loaded. (Thank God for structured content!)

      This makes me wonder what else one might do with microformats and structured data that could be redacted this way?

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    1. Over the years, Google has gone from recommending uploading a text file, to parsing RDFa with a slightly modified Microformats vocabulary, to going all-in on Microdata, to then replacing Microdata with JSON-LD and the new Schema.org vocabulary. In the mean time, the Microformats hReview vocabulary hasn't changed, and has continued to be parsed by Google since it is so widely deployed. It would seem there is some advantage to using a format that was developed externally from Google, since they are unable to simply turn their backs on it and replace it with a new format whenever they want. For this reason, I'm sticking with publishing the Microformats 1 hReview markup for my reviews.
    1. I’m iffy on the value of that metadata - whether schema.org-style annotations have any value. Semantic web has a real religious bent to it that I don’t feel. I want to see the implementations and the full working systems, and I think it’s been long enoough since the introduction of RDFa, Microdata, and JSON-LD that we should be seeing practical, real uses of them. And I’m just not seeing those uses.

      These are some valid points.

      I have been seeing some interesting use cases for microformats getting stronger recently.

    1. A return to RSS or is there something else again in the development of the web?

      There are other options out there, though in many cases distribution is uneven. There are new specs like JSONFeed which many sites and feed readers support just in the last year.

      There are also simpler methods than RSS now including the microformats-based h-feed which one can use to create a simple feed that many feed readers will support.

      Part of RSS's ubiquity is that it is simply so prevalent that most common CMSs still support it. The fact that the idea of RSS is so old and generally un-evolving means there isn't a lot of maintenance involved once it's been set up.

    1. it’s just an XML file

      But it's still an additional side file to maintain versus something simpler like microformats' use of an h-feed.