102 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
    1. Crowther offered everyone who shared at least a certain volume of data with his forest initiative the chance to be a co-author of a study that he and a colleague led. Published in Science in 2016, the paper used more than 770,000 data points from 44 countries to determine that forests with more tree species are more productive4.

      I suspect a similar hypothesis holds for shared specs, code, and the broader idea of plurality within the IndieWeb. More interoperable systems makes the IndieWeb more productive.

  2. Apr 2019
    1. I think most social networks, if they've made this journey, need to make a return to utility to be truly durable.

      This sounds to me like what the IndieWeb is doing. Utility for the site owner directly.

    2. This is the classic cold start problem of social. The answer to the traditional chicken-and-egg question is actually answerable: what comes first is a single chicken, and then another chicken, and then another chicken, and so on. The harder version of the question is why the first chicken came and stayed when no other chickens were around, and why the others followed.

      This gives me a hypothesis about why the chicken post came first within the IndieWeb.

    1. /* Changes the font size on the titles of Kinds */section.response > header {  font-size: 20px;}

      I really like the Kinds plugin, but should look into some of these possibilities.

  3. Mar 2019
    1. On my blog it has context. You can see all the other eat/drink posts on thier own or mixed in with everything else. I can include links to the place where I bought it, who makes it, or related posts.Instagram's context is its a photo with an optional description. It doesn't matter what it's of. It won't contain links to anything.
  4. Feb 2019
    1. But how do we make it happen?

      Larry, I caught your Twitter conversation with Aaron Parecki earlier about IndieWeb. I've added a lot of the open specs he referenced to my own WordPress website with a handful of plugins and would be happy to help you do the same if you like.

      If nothing else, it'll give you some direct experience with how the decentralized nature of how these things work. I'm posting my reply to you own my own site and manually syndicating the reply (since you don't yet support webmention, one of the protocols) which will give at least some idea of how it all works.

      If you're curious about how you could apply it to your own WordPress site, I've collected some research, articles and experiments specific to my experience here: https://boffosocko.com/research/indieweb/

    1. What am I missing about annotations for the web?

      They're not as wide spread certainly, but several people within the IndieWeb have been experimenting with annotations, and Webmention in conjunction with text fragments called fragmentions. In particular, Kartik Prabhu probably has one of the best examples and his site is able to take webmentions to fragments and show them in the margins in his site (much like Medium does).

    1. Professional blogging; whether that be funded by advertisers, subscribers, fans – is a big business. What are your thoughts on how Micro.blog helps or ignores people or businesses that may want to use the platform to share their content and earn a living from it?
    1. However, a healthy news ecosystem doesn’t just require a thriving free press, it also needs a diversity of curators, newsletters and content discovery options that enable the weird and wonderful to surface. We want to use Nuzzel as a test kitchen to see what models works for curators as well as content creators. The simple goal is a sustainable open web where the goals of creators, curators and consumers are aligned around the best possible experience.

      This sounds exciting to me and could dovetail with efforts of many with respect to IndieWeb for Journalism.

  5. Jan 2019
    1. Maintaining a website that you regard as your own does require maintenance. Like a garden, you may choose to let a few weeds flourish, for the wildlife, and you may also seek to encourage volunteers, for the aesthetics. A garden without wildlife is dull, a garden without aesthetics is pointless.
    1. Given that social media is practically a public utility, I think it is worth considering more aggressive strategies, including government subsidies. The government already subsidizes energy exploration, agriculture and other economic activities that the country considers to be a priority, and it is not crazy to imagine that civically responsible social media may be essential to the future of the country. The subsidies might come in the form of research funding, capital for startups, tax breaks and the like.

      Subsidies for social strategies like IndieWeb could be an interesting way to go...

    1. Then I learned about the IndieWeb movement and Micro.blog, and I fell in love with the Internet as I once hoped it would be: a place where people could congregate, converse, and learn from one another with somewhat minimal rancor — and without an overtly overarching need to make a buck with their “content.”
    1. With the new take, we’re also trying to bring more of a classic SvN style back to the site. Not just big, marque pieces, but lots of smaller observations, quotes, links, and other posts as well.

      I wonder if they might also support Webmentions for commenting along with possibly maintaining their own microblog as they move away from Twitter too.

    1. One way to meet the many needs that most if not all publishers share would be to collaboratively develop their digital products. Specifically, they should build for interoperability. One publisher’s CMS, another’s content APIs, a third company’s data offering — they might one day all work together to allow all ships to rise and to reclaim advertising and subscription revenue from the platforms. This might allow publishers to refocus on differentiating where it truly matters for the user: in the quality of their content.

      Some of this is already a-foot within the IndieWeb community with new protocols like Webmention, Micropub, WebSub, and Microsub.

    1. 2019 is the year when publishers — whether big ones like Axios or the Los Angeles Times or tiny ones like mine or Judd Legum’s Popular Information — move away from letting someone else call all the shots. Or, at least, they should.

      There's already some work and movement in the IndieWeb with respect to journalism.

    2. I’ve been working on a redesign of my site recently, using a more robust CMS, and the advantages of controlling the structure of the platform soup-to-nuts are obvious, even if it requires more upfront work.
    3. But what if, in 2019, we take a step back and decide not to let the platform decide how to run the show?

      The IndieWeb has already made some solid strides.

    1. I tried very hard in that book, when it came to social media, to be platform agnostic, to emphasize that social media sites come and go, and to always invest first and foremost in your own media. (Website, blog, mailing list, etc.)
  6. Dec 2018
    1. Newport is an academic — he makes his primary living teaching computer science at a university, so he already has a built-in network and a self-contained world with clear moves towards achievement.

      This is one of the key reasons people look to social media--for the connections and the network they don't have via non-digital means. Most of the people I've seen with large blogs or well-traveled websites have simply done a much better job of connecting and interacting with their audience and personal networks. To a great extent this is because they've built up a large email list to send people content directly. Those people then read their material and comment on their blogs.

      This is something the IndieWeb can help people work toward in a better fashion, particularly with better independent functioning feed readers.

    1. Two key constituencies for social movements are also early adopters: activists and journalists
    2. Plurality, diversity, and tolerance were celebrated

      IndieWeb principles

    1. Without saying it directly, there's a very IndieWeb flavor to this piece.

    2. Today’s leading-edge content tools are integrated context, collaboration and insight machines. We’re moving from unidirectional publishing of articles to organizing all our work and closing the feedback loop with our customers. I call this “full-stack publishing”.

      This sounds a little bit like what the IndieWeb is building for itself!

    1. I think it is one of those topics with a lot of conjecture John. Apologies if there are too many links.

      Don't apologize for links. It's the web and links are important. In fact I might think that you could have a few additional links here! I would have seen it anyway, but I was a tad sad not to have seen a link to that massive pullquote/photo you made at the top of the post which would have sent me a webmention to boot. (Of course WordPress doesn't make it easy on this front either, so your best bet would have been an invisible <link> hidden in the text maybe?)

      I've been in the habit of person-tagging people in posts to actively send them webmentions, but I also have worried about the extra "visual clutter" and cognitive load of the traditional presentation of links as mentioned by John. As a result, I'm now considering adding some CSS to my site so that these webmention links simply look like regular text. This way the notifications will be triggered, but without adding the seeming "cruft" visually or cognitively. Win-win? Thanks for the inspiration!

      In your case here, you've kindly added enough context about what to expect about the included links that the reader can decide for themselves while still making your point. You should sleep easily on this point and continue linking to your heart's content.

    1. This seems like a cool potential way of doing all sorts of things in the IndieWeb space for WordPress. I'm curious what it looks like from other perspectives. I'll have to think this through a bit...

    1. This post has a lot of great things to think about for people either designing social media related websites, or even IndieWeb site designers who might want to take advantage of these things for themselves.

  7. newclues.cluetrain.com newclues.cluetrain.com
    1. Hackers got us into this and hackers will have to get us out.
    1. Where’s my next dashboard? I imagine a next-gen reader that brings me the open web and my social circles in a way that helps me attend to and manage all the flow. There are apps for that, a nice example being FlowReader, which has been around since 2013. I try these things hopefully but so far none has stuck.

      I'm currently hoping that the next wave of social readers based on Microsub and which also support Micropub will be a major part of the answer.

  8. Nov 2018
    1. the technology platforms we rely on are changing and to leave things the way they are is to put our work at risk.
    1. More ways to combat feed overwhelm Before IndieWebCamp, we had a discussion about Readers in a traditional Nürnberger restaurant. Here also, people came up with some ideas to deal with accruing unread-counts. One idea came from how Aperture deletes posts after 7 days. This actually prevents the overload. It would be nice if you can tell your reader that, for example your Twitter feed, is ephemeral and that the posts can be discarded if you did not read them in time. One other idea that came up was to keep track of the average time between posts of a certain feed. This way a Reader could boost posts when they are from a feed that is not regularly updated. These kind of posts are usually lost in piles of more posts from more frequently updates feeds. Yet a last idea was to tell your reader to leave out posts with certain words for a small period of time. This can come in handy when you haven’t watched the newest episode of Game of Thrones yet, but want to stay connected to your feeds without spoilers.

      Some good ideas here to deal with feeds.

    2. Oh IndieWebCamp. You come with a few things you want to for your own website, then you do some completely other things, and after that you leave with an even longer list of things to do for your own website.

      The story of us all...

  9. Oct 2018
    1. there is little power, there is correspondingly little sense of positive responsibility.

      Can this be a response to trolls? When you have power of your domain.

    2. educative process is carried on in a predominantly democratic or non-democratic way becomes, therefore, a question of transcendent importance not only for education itself but for its final effect upon all the interests and activities of a society

      If we want a democratic society we need a democratic educational system. This requires in digital literacy folks to have their own domain.

    3. each individual has something to contribute, whose value can be assessed only as enters into the final pooled intelligence

      the collective feed

    4. Even where democracies now exist, men's minds and feelings are still permeated with ideas about leadership imposed from above, ideas that developed in the long early history of mankind.

      Make a parallel to the rise of commercial silos.

    1. Grant Potter

      Seeing the commentary from Greg McVerry and Aaron Davis, it's probably worthwhile to point you to the IndieWeb for Education wiki page which has some useful resources, pointers, and references. As you have time, feel free to add yourself to the list along with any brainstorming ideas you might have for using some of this technology within your work realm. Many hands make light work. Welcome to the new revolution!

  10. Sep 2018
    1. The real internet is structured by myriad people with different aesthetics and different needs. Online course design decisions should reflect the instructor’s individuality in the same way that everyone else’s webpages do.
  11. Aug 2018
    1. He has no interest in the solution that liberals typically adopt to accommodate diversity: pluralism and multiculturalism.

      Interesting to see an IndieWeb principle pop up here! How do other parts dovetail perhaps? What about other movements?

    1. You find them in a place that you curate yourself, not one “curated” for you by a massive corporate social network intent on forcing you to be every part of yourself to everyone, all at once. You should control how, when, and where to interact with your people.
    2. web we lost
    1. When you can assume that all the materials you’re using in and with your class are open educational resources, here’s one way to remix the effective practices listed above with OER in order to provide you and your students with opportunities to spend your time and effort on work that makes the world a better place instead of wasting it on disposable assignments.

      As I think of remix, reuse, redistribute and things like git and version control, I also can't help but think that being able to send and receive webmentions in the process of reusing and redistribution with referential links back to the originals will allow the original creator to at least be aware of the changes and their existence to potentially manually add them to the original project. (Manually because they may not (yet) know how to keep their content under source control or allow others to do so and send pull requests.)

    1. So that’s already a huge advantage over other platforms due the basic design. And in my opinion it’s got advantages over the other extreme, too, a pure peer-to-peer design, where everyone would have to fend for themselves, without the pooled resources.

      Definitely something the IndieWeb may have to solve for.

    1. A world where one’s primary identity is found through the social people-farms of existing social networks is a problematic one. Educators and parents are in the privileged position of being able to help create a better future, but we need to start modeling to future generations what that might look like.

      This is exactly what I've been attempting to do with my own website. Naturally I use it selfishly for my own purposes, but I'm also using it to model potential behaviours for friends, family and colleagues.

      I'm sometimes tempted to change the tagline on my website to "A digital canary in the coalmine".

  12. Jul 2018
    1. Marginalia#section5 With Webmention support, one could architect a site to allow inline marginalia and highlighting similar to Medium.com’s relatively well-known functionality. With the clever use of URL fragments, which are well supported in major browsers, there are already examples of people who use Webmentions to display word-, sentence-, or paragraph-level marginalia on their sites. After all, aren’t inline annotations just a more targeted version of comments?

      Absolutely. This is what I'd love to have with Hypothesis.

    2. As mentioned earlier, Webmentions allow notifications between web addresses. If both sites are set up to send and receive them, the system works like this: Alice has a website where she writes an article about her rocket engine hobby. Bob has his own website where he writes a reply to Alice’s article. Within his reply, Bob includes the permalink URL of Alice’s article. When Bob publishes his reply, his publishing software automatically notifies Alice’s server that her post has been linked to by the URL of Bob’s reply. Alice’s publishing software verifies that Bob’s post actually contains a link to her post and then (optionally) includes information about Bob’s post on her site; for example, displaying it as a comment. A Webmention is simply an @mention that works from one website to another!
    3. Webmention is a (now) standardized protocol that enables one website address (URL) to notify another website address that the former contains a reference to the latter. It also allows the latter to verify the authenticity of the reference and include its own corresponding reference in a reciprocal way.
    1. Previous efforts at decentralisation also foundered because the economics proved wanting, including those of the original internet. Historically, most protocols were developed by researchers and then maintained by non-profit organisations. But when the internet went mainstream and the money poured in, things got more complex. Commercial interests made finding consensus more difficult, and engineers preferred to join fast-growing internet companies building applications. Besides, incentives to adopt new protocols were lacking.
    1. The centralisation of the internet and the growing importance of data has given rise to what Frank Pasquale of the University of Maryland, in a recent paper published in American Affairs, calls a “Jeffersonian/Hamiltonian divide” among critics of big tech. One group stands in the tradition of Thomas Jefferson, one of America’s founding fathers, who favoured smaller government and less concentration in business. Its members want to rein in the tech titans through tougher antitrust policies, including break-ups. The other group follows the thinking of Alexander Hamilton, another founding father, who supported strong central institutions, both in politics and in the economy. Its adherents argue that to reap the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI) and distribute them fairly, online giants should be treated as utilities.
    2. Venture capitalists now talk about “kill zones”, areas they will not invest in because one of the big players may squeeze the life out of startups or buy them up at a low price.
    3. “We reject: kings, presidents and voting. We believe in: rough consensus and running code.”
    1. I guess this brings us to the Indieweb where you can probably still call each other Netizens and bemoan the death of RSS. Even though it’s been around since 2013, I see a spark of hope in this ragtag group of HTMLists. (Why isn’t “ragtag” some kind of microformat for the homeless?)

      I love this!

    2. flair
    1. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

      So true!!!

  13. Jun 2018
    1. I really need to hash out my domain situation! IndieWeb encourages its memership to claim a single domain and use it as their personal stamp for everything they do on the internet. I, though, have two domains: my long-held personal catch-all domain of jmac.org, and fogknife.com, which I use exclusively for blogging. My use of both predates my involvement with IndieWeb.

      Don't fret too much over having multiple websites. As you continue on the answer to what you want to do with them will eventually emerge more organically than if you force it to. For some thoughts and inspiration, check out https://indieweb.org/multi-site_indieweb

    1. A fullydeveloped version of the proposed intervention(new or modified)

      A turnkey social reader turned LMS that can be applied to any #IndieWeb blogging environment (license up to vendors and partners) as well as openly licensed learning materials and assessment tools.

    1. The other two are where the open web is severely lacking: The seamless integration into one user interface of both reading and writing, making it very easy to respond to others that way, or add to the river of content.

      As I read this I can't help thinking about my friend Aaron Davis (@mrkrndvs) a member of the IndieWeb, whose domain name is appropriately https://readwriterespond.com/

    1. In broadest terms I would define being part of the IndieWeb as owning your own domain name and hosting some sort of website as a means of identifying yourself and attempting to communicate with others on the internet.
    1. life experiences that help them to define themselves

      It is this that scares me. We are no longer just having students define themselves.. Well actually I believe we project many MEs and have many other MEs projected back onto us.

      Yet they are no longer in control of how their life experiences get shared. A social algorithm determines what events they see from friends and what friends see of them.

      Notification provide gratification while reinforcing specific funds of identity.

    2. historically accumulated and culturallydeveloped bod[ies] of knowledge and skills essential for household or individual functioning andwell-being

      What is the meme version of of historically accumulated. Clearly memes are deeply influenced by funds of knowledge as evident by Black Twitter yet they are more temporal and draw heavily on pop culture. At the same time having a deep meme game also signifies status in digital culture.

    3. define themselves and tohelp them grow as human beings

      I believe in a digital world we need to ensure students control the spaces where they are defining themselves.

    4. ositive and negative experienceshave a key role to play in creating links between the classroom and home and in fostering thedevelopment of new identities

      This what scares me. We have added silos as an intermediary in the positive and negative experiences students have.

      An algorithm gets to decide which friends a friend shares communication. A hidden box controls what experience gets reinforced in youth culture.

      Think about that. We have handed off the creation and curation of identities of children to corporations.

    1. Digital writing has come a long way in the past decade

      Often the wrong way. We went from an open web where everyone controlled where they published to a homogenized world of corporate silos where alogrithims influence what we read and thus what we write.

      Web 2.0 became the corporate web.

      True critical digital literacies must begin by taking back control of your identity.

    2. Just over twenty years ago, at the same time

      Here is the thing the next decade of digital writing would be best served if it looked like the digital writing of yesterday.

      Let's stick to html on domains students own.

  14. May 2018
    1. <div class="h-entry"> <a class="p-author h-card" href="http://mysite.example.org"> <img alt="" src="http://mysite.example.org/icon.jpg"/> Supercool Indiewebauthor</a>: RSVP <span class="p-rsvp">yes</span> to <a href="http://example.com/event" class="u-in-reply-to">IndieWeb Example Event</a> </div>

      is the tag properly nested in this example?

  15. Apr 2018
    1. For instance, if someone replies to a post on Twitter, the reply gets sent back here as a comment. However if I reply here to that comment, it doesn’t get sent back to Twitter.

      This is an interesting problem. It also becomes an issue of having the comment reply on the WP site be able to have the Twitter responses to that come back to the original, potentially as a comment with a URL with a fragment.

    2. There’s a lot of overlap between Micro.blog and IndieWeb (webmentions being the most significant commonality), and IndieWeb isn’t one monolithic thing.

      micro.blog is a paid hosting service that can allow one to have an IndieWeb website, while at the same time is open enough that one can have their own separate site and connect with the micro.blog community using it primarily as a reader.

      What micro.blog is to you is highly dependent on what tools you're already bringing to the table.

  16. Jan 2018
    1. we are ending the HuffPost contributor platform

      Just another site-death...

      Ben Walsh of the LA Times Data Desk has created a simple web interface at www.SaveMy.News that journalists can use to archive their stories to The Internet Archive and WebCite. One can log into the service via Twitter and later download a .csv file with a running list of all their works with links to the archived copies.

    2. Perhaps a few too many: One of the biggest challenges we all face, in an era where everyone has a platform, is figuring out whom to listen to. Open platforms that once seemed radically democratizing now threaten, with the tsunami of false information we all face daily, to undermine democracy. When everyone has a megaphone, no one can be heard.
    1. small niche sites that only a handful of users might use can also be part of the same ecosystem.

      Perhaps this is something that David Shanske could leverage for adding IndieWeb functionality within WordPress?

    1. shifting it to another company which then gets to control (and even monetize) the conversation.

      As I've heard in the Indieweb chat: "Silos gonna silo."

    2. write your own blog post on your own damn site

      And isn't this what everyone should really be doing anyway so that they own their own work and words?

    1. You know Goethe's (or hell, Disney's) story of The Sorceror's Apprentice? Look it up. It'll help. Because Mark Zuckerberg is both the the sorcerer and the apprentice. The difference with Zuck is that he doesn't have all the mastery that's in the sorcerer's job description. He can't control the spirits released by machines designed to violate personal privacy, produce echo chambers, and to rationalize both by pointing at how popular it all is with the billions who serve as human targets for messages (while saying as little as possible about the $billions that bad acting makes for the company).

      This is something I worry about with the IndieWeb movement sometimes. What will be the ultimate effect of everyone having their own site instead of relying on social media? In some sense it may have a one-to-one map to personal people (presuming there aren't armies of bot-sites) interacting. The other big portion of the puzzle that I often leave out is the black box algorithms that social silos run which have a significant influence on their users. Foreseeably one wouldn't choose to run such a black box algorithm on their own site and by doing so they take a much more measured and human approach to what they consume and spread out, in part because I hope they'll take more ownership of their own site.

  17. Aug 2017
    1. I would like to see contributions for which I am really interested, which stimulate me to think, in which I can learn something.
    1. I want a human curated web experience. I don’t want my experience curated by mysterious algorithms.
    1. Remember when the internet was going to usher in an age of peace and understanding because humans would be able to communicate with each other? It didn't happen.

      What didn't happen? The age of peace and understanding, or the ability for humans to communicate with each other freely?

  18. Jul 2017
    1. the role of the blog is different than it was even just a couple of years ago. It’s not the sole outpost of an online life, although it can be an anchor, holding it in place.
    1. If you want to respond, do so on your own website and tell me.

      Often it's the mechanism by which the tell me is the most difficult. Fortunately Webmentions make this a bit easier, particularly if they're moderated so the original author can control what's on their website.

  19. Jun 2017
    1. But the ability to work on indie projects is not available to all. The time and resources required to work indie are a sign of privilege, as is encouraging (and certainly expecting) all to work indie. As Anne Pasek writes, “all materials and practices … have a cost and thus a tollgate for participation.” (And there are many, often intersecting, forms of privilege that contribute to that “toll” ― race, gender, orientation, cultural background, economic background, able-bodiedness, etc.) So while indie work is great, and I’ve done a lot of it myself, we need to be careful about the ways in which we encourage and characterize indie work, noting in particular what it costs and who may be left behind or left out.

      This is all important and certainly true.

      However, as someone who knows he's certainly privileged, I view my definition of indie as something that is also open for others to come behind me and use for free or have the ability to reuse and remix in a way that corporate interests or non-indie work wouldn't. In a large sense, to me this means that while I may be privileged (whether that be socio-economically or even the time-encumbered), I'm helping to lower the cost and the burden for the less privileged who may come behind me to be able to do more, go further, or go faster.

      In some sense too, as described, indie has such a nebulous definition. Often when I see it in a technology related space I really read it as "Open Sourced".

    1. Content that isn’t indexable by search engines is not part of the open web.
  20. May 2017
    1. my blog posts to be long-lived pieces of my consciousness: something I may want to refer back to, or remember in the future.

      a commonplace book!

    1. You’re giv­ing up far more than de­sign choice. Mr. Williams de­scribes Medium’s key ben­e­fit as res­cu­ing writ­ers from the “ter­ri­ble dis­trac­tion” of for­mat­ting chores. But con­sider the cost. Though he’s bait­ing the hook with de­sign, he’s also ask­ing you, the writer, to let him con­trol how you of­fer your work to read­ers. Mean­ing, to get the full ben­e­fit of Medium’s de­sign, you have to let your story live on Medium, send all your read­ers to Medium, have your work per­ma­nently en­tan­gled with other sto­ries on Medium, and so on—a sig­nif­i­cant concession.

      You're definitely not owning your own data.

  21. Apr 2017
    1. In indieweb we have been saying ‘build things that you want for yourself’, but building things that you want for your friends or organisation is a useful step between generations.
    1. webmentions

      I'd recommend defining webmentions along with a link to the spec and W3C recommendation just after linkbacks/pingbacks as their more modern successor.

      As some of your potential audience isn't webmention aware, you could/should add some additional definition for those who are unlikely to click through to see the real value they represent.

  22. Mar 2017
  23. Feb 2017
    1. At any given moment, a field may be dominated by squabbles, but, in the end, the methodology prevails. Science moves forward, even as we remain stuck in place.

      This also sounds like the reason why the Indieweb movement is so interesting and potentially useful.

  24. Aug 2016
    1. But first, what would motivate any young person today to pull the plug? Well maybe they should consider this for a moment. Who most wants you to stay on the grid? The advertisers. Your boss. Human Resources. The advertisers. Your parents (irony of ironies – once they distrusted it, now they need to tag you electronically, share your Facebook photos and message you to death). The advertisers. The government. Your local authority. Your school. Advertisers.

      Going of the grid hurts "The man" in 70's parlance.

  25. Apr 2016
    1. APIs are building blocks of software by definitionCompared with SaaS, by nature, they are platforms that allow development on top of them.It brings back the nature of “building block” that open source has and SaaS lost.API’s businesses focus on solving “smaller” problems but hard to crackFor that reason, there are higher chances that customers will trust an API provider for their core infrastructure.“If this is the only thing those guys do, there’s high chances they will do it better than myself”.

      This idea of APIs blending the best (business models) of open source and SaaS is intriguing.

    1. People want to own their data and their namespace but they don’t want to run servers to do it. What’s the solution? Separate the elements. Treat your personal server as a BDS (Big Dumb Server), there to answer API calls and file requests.  Move the admin interfaces up towards the client, and maintain them centrally the way apps are maintained. Eventually, move the presentation layer towards the client too, allowing readers power over how they consume the data on your server.
      • Database:
        • provided by host
        • general purpose
        • accessible by http or https API
      • Database administration:
        • Native app or Web interface making privileged API calls.
        • GUI file browser for web server folders and files.
      • Presentation Layer
        • Pull pages (or other data) from multiple databases.
        • Customizable: the data you want, in the way you want to display it or otherwise use it.
    1. appreciate your help

      I think that a major part of improving the issue of abuse and providing consent is building in notifications so that website owners will at least be aware that their site is being marked up, highlighted, annotated, and commented on in other locations or by other platforms. Then the site owner at least has the knowledge of what's happening and can then be potentially provided with information and tools to allow/disallow such interactions, particularly if they can block individual bad actors, but still support positive additions, thought, and communication. Ideally this blocking wouldn't occur site wide, which many may be tempted to do now as a knee-jerk reaction to recent events, but would be fine grained enough to filter out the worst offenders.

      Toward the end of notifications to site owners, it would be great if any annotating activity would trigger trackbacks, pingbacks, or the relatively newer and better webmention protocol of the WW3C out of the http://IndieWebCamp.com movement. Then site owners would at least have notifications about what is happening on their site that might otherwise be invisible to them.

      Perhaps there's a way to further implement filters or tools (a la Akismet on platforms like WordPress) that allow site users to mark materials as spam, abusive, or other so that they are then potentially moved from "public" facing to "private" so that the original highlighter can still see their notes, but that the platform isn't allowing the person's own website to act as a platform to give reach to bad actors.

      Further some site owners might appreciate graded filters (G, PG, PG-13, R, X) so that users or even parents can filter what they're willing to see. Consider also annotations on narrative forms that might be posted as spoilers--how can these be guarded against? (Possibly with CSS and a spoiler tag?) Options can be built into the platform itself as well as allowing server-side options for truly hard cases.

      My coding skills are rustier than I wish they were, but I'm available to help/consult if needed.

  26. Jan 2016
    1. Simple: We’re in danger of losing what’s made the Internet the most important medium in history – a decentralized platform where the people at the edges of the networks – that would be you and me – don’t need permission to communicate, create and innovate.

      Right on!

    1. Your articles and status messages can go to all services, not just one

      Interoperability?

    2. When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation.

      Ownership of data/content. My annotations are mine.

  27. Dec 2015
    1. Hypothesis might make a fine alternative to Twitter.

      • Is anyone using hypothesis in this way yet?
      • What would be a good tag to distinguish "tweet" Notes?<br> (I guess it would be cute to use "tweet" as the tag.)
      • When there's not a specific webpage involved, what would be the best URLs on which to attach such a Note?<br> (I suppose any page of your own on a social media site or blog would do. I also see that we can annotate pages on local servers.)
  28. Nov 2015
    1. Reclaim Hosting, Known, and Brigham Young University are working on an interface for student domains that will provide easy cross-posting to several social media sites, and easy viewing of those posts among peers in groups. The students will still be able to install whatever other server software they need.

  29. Nov 2014
    1. What social networks does this work with? Right now, if you have a website on Known, you can use Bridgy to collect social interactions from Facebook and Twitter.

      This is partly wrong. I know at least that @bnvk uses Bridgy together with Social Igniter.

      Therefore the paragraph could also mention the #IndieWeb itself.