433 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The goal of Quartz is to make hosting your own public digital garden free and simple. You don’t even need your own website. Quartz does all of that for you and gives your own little corner of the internet. https://github.com/jackyzha0/quartz

      Quartz runs on top of Hugo so all notes are written in Markdown .

    1. As Berry says, “We arespeaking where we stand, and we shall stand afterwards in thepresence of what we have said.”

      A great quote to be sure. Perhaps a definition of having a personal website for online communication?

    2. Coding is a problem-solving skill, and few of theproblems that beset young people today, or are likely to in thefuture, can be solved by writing scripts or programs for computersto execute. I suggest a less ambitious enterprise with broaderapplications, and I’ll begin by listing the primary elements of thatenterprise. I think every young person who regularly uses acomputer should learn the following:

      Alan Jacobs eschews the admonishment that everyone should learn to code and posits a more basic early literacy stepping-stone to coding: learning some basic preliminaries of self-hosting. This is likely much easier for most people and could build a better runway for those who would like to learn to code later on.

    1. Earlier this year, a group of writers with popular tech and culture newsletters expanded upon this premise; they joined together to launch a Discord server called Sidechannel where all their subscribers could meet and chat. (“So it’s just people paying for internet friends?” asked one woman I know when this arrangement was described to her. Yes, and currently Sidechannel has some 5,000 members, several hundred of whom may be active at a given time.)

      There's something a bit depressing about the idea of paying for online friends. Though creating, managing, and tummeling these sorts of community is definitely a form of social and creative "work".

      How much work do these creators do on this front? How much is the writing and creating versus the management and community building? What else goes into it all?

      Compare and contrast the work done by individuals in the IndieWeb community.

    2. Early on, circa 2015, there was a while when every first-person writer who might once have written a Tumblr began writing a TinyLetter. At the time, the writer Lyz Lenz observed that newsletters seemed to create a new kind of safe space. A newsletter’s self-selecting audience was part of its appeal, especially for women writers who had experienced harassment elsewhere online.

      What sort of spaces do newsletters create based upon their modes of delivery? What makes them "safer" for marginalized groups? Is there a mitigation of algorithmic speed and reach that helps? Is it a more tacit building of community and conversation? How can these benefits be built into an IndieWeb space?

      How can a platform provide "reach" while simultaneously creating negative feedback for trolls and bad actors?

  2. Jul 2021
    1. # 17:52 GWG Welcome to the Indieweb, where our dreams are limited by time

      https://chat.indieweb.org/dev/2021-07-09

      A great tagline for IndieWeb

    1. I guess my Pastor wanted to take today off. We didn't have church today, which is strange. OK interesting question that someone brought up on Twitter. Is it weird that you can't tweet from an RSS reader? I mean, someone said they don't use RSS for this reason.

      @ladyhope It is weird. It's also something that the IndieWeb community has been working on fixing. There is a class of social feed readers (using Microsub, and including micro.blog) that allows one to subscribe and read, but also allows one to reply inline and post to their own websites (which could then also syndicate to social media sites). indieweb.org/social_re... has some examples, including several you could dovetail with your WordPress site.

      Syndication: https://micro.blog/chrisaldrich/11655781

    1. A great overview of some of the various definitions of small web and what it might entail.

    2. Another interpretation of the “Small Web” concept is that it refers to the use of alternative protocols to the dominant HTTP(S), lightweight ones like the older Gopher and newer Gemini. For example, the blog post Introduction to Gemini describes these collectively as “the Small Internet”.

      Maybe the idea of a "personal internet" is what we're all really looking for? Something with some humanity? Something that's fun? Something that has some serendipity?

  3. Jun 2021
    1. It wasn't as straightforward as I thought it would be, so I've written this blog post for anyone who's trying to do the same with their NextJS blog.

      I recall Monica Powell writing a bit about this with some video a while back.

      Perhaps not as useful after-the-fact, but her post is hiding on in the see also section of https://indieweb.org/Webmention where I've archived a copy of your article as well. Maybe the IndieWeb wiki needs a NextJS page to make this a bit more findable?

      Perhaps the similarities and differences in your approaches will help others in the future.

    1. I do wonder a bit about the potential misuse/abuse of sending tickets as notifications to people who don't want them.

      Hopefully once the system is up and distributed it's relatively easy to ignore or block tickets from bad actors. Email spam is a similar model to this.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>KevinMarks</span> in #indieweb 2021-06-25 (<time class='dt-published'>06/26/2021 01:52:39</time>)</cite></small>

      IndieWeb + Welsh finally comes in handy! The Cwtch service Kevin Marks mentioned is the the Welsh word for "hug" or "cuddle" and cleverly has a heart shaped Celtic design for their logo. Kind of cute when you think about it. And speaking of opaque ids, if they're using a new protocol I hope they call it Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch....

    1. I've run into Phil Jones in the digital gardens telegram group, but not looked very closely at [[Cardigan Bay]] before.

      Based on the idea of teh [[Smallest Federated Wiki]], Cardigan Bay is a wiki engine in Clojure which can be found on GitHub at interstar/cardigan-bay.

      Be sure to invite Jones to [[Gardens and Streams II]].

    1. Apps that allow one to own/control their own data. Many apps work with [[Fission]] and [[Solid]].

      This may be one of the first places that I've seen multiple apps that appear to actually run Solid. Will have to dig further to see if it's not vaporware.

    1. Reply to Nick Milo:

      Ward Cunningham may have been using a similar UI prior to it for other projects, but he unveiled the Smallest Federated Wiki at IndieWeb Camp 2011 in late June: https://indieweb.org/2011/Smallest_Federated_Wiki. I don't have a receipt to prove it, but I have to suspect that Andy's version was certainly influenced by Cunningham's work.

      Mike Caulfield, subsequent author of the influential The Garden and the Stream: a Technopastoral, Iterated on the Smallest Federated Wiki and created a WordPress-based plugin shortly thereafter called Wikity that used some of the card-based UI that Obsidian comes with out of the box.

      Both had some early influence on the UI-based research that the IndieWeb space has done since. For those interested, there's also a sub-group within it focusing on digital gardens, commonplace books, Zettelkasten, etc. that can be found here: https://indieweb.org/commonplace_book

  4. May 2021
    1. Keeping your garden on the open web also sets you up to take part in the future of gardening. At the moment our gardens are rather solo affairs. We haven't figure out how to make them multi-player. But there's an enthusiastic community of developers and designers trying to fix that. It's hard to say what kind of libraries, frameworks, and design patterns might emerge out of that effort, but it certainly isn't going to happen behind a Medium paywall.

      There are a few of us using Webmention for this. Similarly there are some running open wikis or experiments like Flancian's agora.

    2. In performance-blog-land you do that thinking and researching privately, then shove it out at the final moment. A grand flourish that hides the process.

      This generally doesn't happen with IndieWeb-based sites where one often publishes all the smaller tidbits along the way and intersperses them with the longer articles.

      Of course, not everyone here necessarily publishes everything publicly either.

    3. They're less rigid, less performative, and less perfect than the personal websites we're used to seeing.

      Is this also because they have inherently different audiences?

    1. I have received a lot of positive feedback for noting my epistemic status and effort at the top of my posts. This is hilarious, because I originally started using these as a hack in order to publish half-baked ideas that I'd otherwise not feel comfortable sharing.

      This is an interesting hack for getting one to hit the publish button.

      I wonder if people have renamed the "publish" button in their CMS to make hitting it easier?

      My own anecdotal evidence is that hitting it often can certainly make it seem trivial, particularly if one is posting their status updates to their site along with everything else.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Maggie Appleton</span> in A Brief History & Ethos of the Digital Garden (<time class='dt-published'>05/28/2021 18:08:16</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Ru does a retrospective about how much work and energy a static site can be to maintain a personal website.

    2. Yet, every time I open up my Eleventy codebase, I want to puke (figuratively). Having gained distance and perspective from the codebase, it now looks less like a personal website and more like software. Even if a lot of it is well-engineered, it feels overblown for what it is supposed to do.

      Even for a smart and experienced programmer, maintaining a static website generator site can be a lot of work.

    1. go-jamming is a cool looking Webmention sender and receiver, particularly for SSGs. It can be used to service multiple websites as well.

      Requires a bit of configuration and build into one's templates, but it looks pretty well documented.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>KevinMarks</span> in #indieweb 2021-05-12 (<time class='dt-published'>05/18/2021 19:50:04</time>)</cite></small>

    1. I am now definitely Team Maria!

    2. A former FB executive and long-standing friend of Zuckerberg emailed him in 2012 (page 31) to say “The number one threat to Facebook is not another scaled social network, it is the fracturing of information / death by a thousand small vertical apps which are loosely integrated together.”

      And this is almost exactly what the IndieWeb is.

    1. This is a rather cool find and I can think of a few ways of using it.

      Being able to add widgets easily to the dashboard can be a highly useful thing!

      Also having the ability to easily add an admin page in the menu could be incredibly helpful in this setting.

    1. Assuming I’m not reusing passwords all over the place, at least the worst thing you could do with my Neopets account is mistreat my virtual pet. Imagine, instead, that you’re a queer kid living in a small town in 1999, and you sign up for Livejournal and use it to find a supportive and loving queer community online. Then in 2007 Livejournal gets sold to a company based in Russia, which in 2013 criminalizes the distribution of pro-LGBTQ content to minors, and in 2017 Livejournal loses the account info of 26 million users. Was it your responsibility to monitor the shifting geopolitical context of your childhood diary for the next two decades?

      With regard to these portions, being a member of the IndieWeb and maintaining your own data on your own website is useful as one doesn't need to worry about these sorts of corporate shifts, sell-off, changes, etc.

    1. I cannot speak for the editor but I don’t see why Searchmysite would not also accept and crawl static HTML websites (ie. Retro or vintage HTML sites) so long as the site has some value and content that it can index, but they might not.

      They certainly could. I've seen the author haunting the IndieWeb chat in the past and they've mentioned that crawling and saving data can tend to be a bit on the expensive side, so they're trying to do more targeted search/save when they can. Perhaps as the project matures, it will add these sorts of functionalities.

    1. You can check out the new platform — which is essentially a short-form blog — by heading to www.DonaldJTrump.com/desk.

      Apparently he's invented the idea of a microblog? And he's got a /desk page?

      What comes next?

      But let's be honest, he was posting these short status updates like this just a few days after he got kicked off of Twitter. He's just got a slightly better UI now.

    1. all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      We really need to get around to scheduling the second session of Gardens and Streams.

    2. esterday evening, Ton Zijlstra organized the first Dutch Obsidian meetup. I didn’t really know what to expect, and in the end I’m glad I let my curiosity get the better of me, as we chatted for almost two hours on various struggles with contemporary note-taking using the relatively new note-taking player, Obsidian. Read Frank Meeuwsen’s expectations and Ton’s afterthoughts on their respective blogs (in Dutch). Together with Sebastiaan Andeweg and myself, the four of us had a great time showing each other how we tackle digital note-taking. It turned out to be a small but quirky group of like-minded people: all active note-takers, life-hackers, and apparently also IndieWeb-enabled bloggers!

      This sounds like a fun way to get together. I'm personally curious to see people taking their Obsidian data and turning them into IndieWeb-friendly linked Memexes. It's interesting to use Obsidian to have a thought conversation with one's self, but it could also be interesting if they could have conversations with each other via Webmention.

      For me the more difficult piece is not so much getting the thing online, but setting it up so that the backlinks all work properly using the [[wikilink]] syntax.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. After the recent brouhaha at Basecamp (context: https://www.platformer.news/p/-what-really-happened-at-basecamp), a great example of someone using their own domain because they didn't want the bad press of a silo/platform to stick to them

    1. Darius Kazemi randomly tweets out pages from books in the Internet Archive as a means of creating discovery and serendipity.

      Library Futures, Jennie Rose Halperin @Library_futures @little_wow

      Idea of artificial scarcity being imposed on digital objects is a damaging thing for society.

      Ideas to explore:

      Libraries as a free resource could be reframed as a human right within a community.

      Librarians as local community tummelers around information.

      Joanne McNeill

    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. enumjorge 7 hours ago [–] Same. I was intrigued and wanted to start exploring the sites that make up this “indie web”, but the landing page doesn’t list them. Clicked on “Getting Started Now” which took me to a busy looking wiki page talking about Wordpress? Confused, I left.

      This is an intriguing question that I've seen a few different times:

      Where is the IndieWeb?

      Perhaps worth writing an essay to describe where to find some of these sites if you wanted to interact with them.

      Include

      • chat names
      • indie map lists
      • web ring

      Part of it is how you define IndieWeb. What are those potential criteria.

    1. What I like about some of the newer platforms (Ghost, Medium, Social Media platforms) is the way the default post and the menus themselves more clearly guide the user in their decisions about how to interact. There is a sense that the platform offers points of entry. Doesn’t hold the user’s hand – but welcomes them, points to stuff, and smiles at the user a bit more.

      Here's a great example of a person who wants some of the UI niceties provided by onboarding for new users. This can be incredibly important for people who are new to the platform.

      On the flip side, it's much easier to do for a social media platform like Twitter which only does one or two things. It can be far harder for platforms like WordPress which have a lot more complexity or uses and require personas or use-types to do this well.

    1. Since I’m doing that, I’m also considering whether it makes sense for me to have a substack blog as well?

      Given some of the press Substack has gotten in the past few months, I think there's more to be said for actively leaving Substack to move to WordPress or some other platform where you can use your own domain name and content.

      Congratulations on the move!

    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

    1. I totally get where Jacy is coming from.

      It's difficult to try to be all things to all people, particularly when they have so many diverse needs/wants and there are so many options for various levels of technical expertise.

      It's like teaching algebra to a 4th grader, an 8th grader and an advanced graduate student. They all need dramatically different textbooks for their different levels of sophistication.

    1. I asked Seyal if Pinterest had ever considered a feature that let users mark a life event complete. Canceled. Finished. Done. “We would have to have a system that thinks about things on an event level, so we could deliver on the promise,” Seyal said. “Right now we just use relevance as a measure.” But had Pinterest considered that, in the long run, people might be more inclined to use the app if it could become a clean space for them when they needed it to be, a corner of the internet uncluttered with grief?

      This would be a great feature for IndieWeb creators to consider.

    1. This year’s Slow Art Day — April 10 — comes at a time when museums find themselves in vastly different circumstances.

      Idea: Implement a slow web week for the IndieWeb, perhaps to coincide with the summit at the end of the week.

      People eschew reading material from social media and only consume from websites and personal blogs for a week. The tough part is how to implement actually doing this. Many people would have a tough time finding interesting reading material in a short time. What are good discovery endpoints for that? WordPress.com's reader? Perhaps support from feed reader community?

    1. While it is work in progress, it will live on sarasoueidan.dev. So this Web site you’re on right now will still be here while the new one comes to life. Once the new site is done, it will replace this one on the dot com domain.

      This is a fun reason to have more than one website.

  6. Mar 2021
    1. The United States has no real answer to these challenges, and no wonder: We don’t have an internet based on our democratic values of openness, accountability, and respect for human rights. An online system controlled by a tiny number of secretive companies in Silicon Valley is not democratic but rather oligopolistic, even oligarchic.

      Again, a piece that nudges me to thing that a local-based IndieWeb provider/solution would be a good one. Either co-op based, journalism-based, or library-based.

    2. Americans worked together: “As soon as several of the inhabitants of the United States have conceived a sentiment or an idea that they want to produce in the world, they seek each other out; and when they have found each other, they unite.”

      The IndieWeb is very much this.

    1. @ajlkn has several related projects including this one:

      Might be an interesting experiment to make one or more of them IndieWeb friendly and create a set up to dovetail one or more of them in with the GitHub pages set up.

    1. There's been occasional talk in the IndieWeb chat about recipes that have long boring pre-stories and don't get to the point.

      This is one of the first examples I've seen of a food blog that has a "Jump to Recipe" button and a "Print Recipe" button right at the top for those who are in a hurry, or who have read the post previously.

      Will look for other examples...

    1. It comprises the collection of "mutual knowledge, mutual beliefs, and mutual assumptions" that is essential for communication between two people.

      I've seen a few people with websites that have a grouping of some of their past posts to help orient new readers into their way of thinking and understanding to help provide common grounding for new readers.

      Colin Walker is an example that has had one in the past, but it looks like the move from WordPress to his new system, the original link to that data is gone now. His page was called "required" and an archived version of his example(s) can be found archived here: https://web.archive.org/web/2020*/https://colinwalker.blog/required/

    1. the IndieWeb, a group of hipsters with websites trying to take down THE MAN (aka the “corporate web”).
    1. streak New posts for 52 consecutive weeks.

      It's kind of cool that he's got a streak counter for his posts.

    2. I want the patina of fingerprints, the quiet and comfortable background hum of a library.

      A great thing to want on a website! A tiny hint of phatic interaction amongst internet denizens.

    3. If I’m in a meeting, I should be able to share a link in the chat to a particular post on my blog, then select the paragraph I’m talking about and have it highlighted for everyone. Well, now I can.

      And you could go a few feet farther if you added fragment support to the site, then the browser would also autoscroll to that part. Then you could add a confetti cannon to the system and have the page rain down confetti when more than three people have highlighted the same section!

    1. A news co-op is a news organization owned by its readers, whose membership fees pay for open access journalism – no paywall – usually organized as nonprofits (an IRS rule-change lets for-profit newspaper convert to nonprofits).

      I'm sort of wishing that we could also have social media co-ops. I suspect that there are a few on Mastodon that operate like this, but it would be interesting to see some focused around in-person communities as well.

      Why couldn't my local library run a town/city-based social media co-op?

      For this matter, why couldn't my local news co-op also run it's own social media platform?

    1. These newsletters are the most backed up pieces of writing in history, copies in millions of inboxes, on millions of hard drives and servers, far more than any blog post. More robust than an Internet Archive container. LOCKSS to the max. These might be the most durable copies yet of ourselves. They’re everywhere but privately so, hidden, piggybacking on the most accessible, oldest networked publishing platform in the world.

      This is an interesting point about longevity of content. It's definitely a good reason to email it out as well as to post it on your own website and archive it all at the same time.

    2. If I’m writing about newsletters, let me point at some that excite and delight:

      This makes me wonder if anyone else is keeping newsletterrolls?

    3. Silence Here’s another, more subtle, point about the grace of email and newsletters: Creation and consumption don’t happen in the same space. When I go to send a missive in Campaign Monitor the world of my laptop screen is as silent as a midnight Tokyo suburb.9 I think we’ve inured ourselves to the (false) truth that in order to post something, in order to contribute something to the stream, we must look at the stream itself, “Bird Box”-esque, and woe be the person in a productive creative jag, wanting to publish, who can resist those hot political tweets.

      This rings very true to me and is a definite benefit of composing things within my own domain rather than too quickly within a social silo's interface.

    4. I try to be deliberate, and social networks seem more and more to say: You don’t know what you want, but we do. Which, to someone who, you know, gives a shit, is pretty dang insulting.

      Definitely a great reason for the IndieWeb principle of make what you need.

    5. Ownership is the critical point here. Ownership in email in the same way we own a paperback: We recognize that we (largely) control the email subscriber lists, they are portable, they are not governed by unknowable algorithmic timelines.3 And this isn’t ownership yoked to a company or piece of software operating on quarterly horizon, or even multi-year horizon, but rather to a half-century horizon. Email is a (the only?) networked publishing technology with both widespread, near universal adoption,4 and history. It is, as they say, proven.

      This is very IndieWeb in flavor.

      It reminds me of Stanley Meyer who would read newspapers and magazines every day and cut out articles which he put into envelopes for his friends and children and mailed out every couple of weeks. Essentially his own newsletter, but by snail mail.

    6. Years ago, I helped build a storytelling platform called Hi (a simplification of its original name: Hitotoki, now shuttered and archived) and one of the things I’m most proud of our team having concocted is the commenting system. We had tens of thousands of users and almost no issues with harassment. You could comment on anyone’s story and your having commented would be public — a little avatar at the bottom of the page — but the comment itself would be private. This allowed folks to reap the public validation of engagement (“Whoa! So many comments!”) while simultaneously removing any grandstanding or attacks. It wasn’t quite messaging. It wasn’t quite commenting. It felt very much like a contemporary, lighter take on email, and in being so was a joy to use. Here’s what the bottom of an entry looks like: "Commenting" on Hitotoki

      I like the design and set up for this feature. Perhaps something for the IndieWeb to pick up? In some sense the implementation of Webmention-based likes, bookmarks, and facepiled mentions on my site is just this sort of design.

      The anecdotal evidence that there was little harassment is a positive sign for creating such a thing.

    1. It's the feedback that's motivating A-list bloggers like Digg founder Kevin Rose to shut down their blogs and redirect traffic to their Google+ profiles. I have found the same to be true.

      This didn't work out too well for them did it?

    1. The only way to own my lamp was to pwn my lamp.

      Does IoT then really stand for IndieWeb of Things?

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    1. A complicated and messy essay underlining the fact that people can figure out how to use technology in off-label ways to better humanity rather than sitting back on the intended uses of these tools.

      I definitely want to reference this in my presentation part of my workshop for "A Twitter of Our Own" for OERxDomains21.

    2. And it’s tempting for engineers to think decentralising the Web can be achieved with technology. But really, it’s people who will make it happen. Rather than staying put in our little filter bubbles, we can burst out of them — and be radically sociable, delinquent, and make a scene.

      off label uses of technology are important

      I'm reminded of how Kicks Condor has appreciated my "people work" in the past.

    3. according to Hao, Mark Zuckerberg wants to increase the number of people who log into Facebook six days a week. I’m not going to get into whether this is good or bad here, but it certainly shows that what you are doing, and how you are doing it, is very important to Facebook.

      Can we leverage these data points to follow a movement like Meatless Monday to encourage people to not use Facebook two days a week to cause this data analysis to crash?

      Anything that is measured can be gamed. But there's also the issue of a moving target because Facebook will change it's target which then means the community activism will need to change it's target as well. (This may be fine if the point is community engagement and education as the overall mission, in which case the changing target continually engages people and brings in new people to consider what is happening and why.)

    4. And they are one of the reasons most digital services don’t come with a How To manual. Most of the time, we’re not expected to use them the “right” way; most of the time there is no right way, because most digital services bend to meet our needs.A

      How can the IndieWeb as a group do this piece better? Perhaps it comes down to individual sub-providers which is fine, but if the larger group can do it from the top down...

    5. Can we occupy technology with love?

      An interesting re-framing of the social media problem. Similar to the IndieWeb philosophy, but a bit more pointed.

    1. I really like this and want to figure out way to do it on my own website. It could be fun to tuck it in with the weather and location data I'm already collecting.

    1. Summary of moving from in person to online events a year ago.

      I like her admonition to consider welcoming new people to a community in an online only space.

      Try to avoid in-jokes. Make space for more phatic communication. Make considerations for parents, particularly around mealtimes and bedtimes.

    1. Ravi outlines some of how he syndicates from his Drupal website to Twitter.

      I particularly appreciated that he's using a sort of taxonomy within Drupal to add some of his particular content to "books" which aggregate related content together. If this were done in an editable outline then it should be easier to aggregate and edit later into an actual book. This would be a cool UI to have within a website for writing and creating.

    1. they have integrity, and integrity means something right now.

      How does integrity fit into the IndieWeb space? Particularly as it scales and more people depend on a small number of developers and designers.

    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Aram Zucker-Scharff</span> in Ernie Smith on Twitter: "You don’t need Substack. Today’s @readtedium explains how you can self-host your newsletter on the cheap: https://t.co/yp2tLBRS4a" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>03/18/2021 23:48:57</time>)</cite></small>

    1. I just wanted a way to send out my irregularly-updated newsletter to a couple thousand subscribers without getting caught in a spam filter.

      This is the short version of what Substack is and why people want to use it.

  7. www.nj.com www.nj.com