93 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I will just observe that there is some­thing about this tech­nol­ogy that has seemed, over the years, to scold rather than invite; enclose rather than expand; and strip away rather than layer upon.
  2. Jun 2022
    1. showRSS tracks most TV shows, so you don't have to. RSS integration lets you automate your set up.
  3. May 2022
    1. <channel> Elements: <sy:updatePeriod> ( 'hourly' | 'daily' | 'weekly' | 'monthly' | 'yearly' ) <sy:updateFrequency> ( a positive integer ) <sy:updateBase> ( #PCDATA ) [W3CDTF]
    1. 'art19': 'https://art19.com/xmlns/rss-extensions/1.0', 'atom': 'http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom', 'atom10': 'http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom"', 'cc': 'http://web.resource.org/cc/', 'content': 'http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/', 'creativeCommons': 'http://backend.userland.com/creativeCommonsRssModule', 'dc': 'http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/', 'ddn': 'http://discoverydn.com/about', 'feedburner': 'http://rssnamespace.org/feedburner/ext/1.0', 'feedpress': 'https://feed.press/xmlns', 'geo': 'http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#', 'georss': 'http://www.georss.org/georss', 'googleplay': 'http://www.google.com/schemas/play-podcasts/1.0', 'itunes': 'http://www.itunes.com/dtds/podcast-1.0.dtd', 'media': 'http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/', 'npr': 'https://www.npr.org/rss/', 'nprml': 'https://api.npr.org/nprml', 'rawvoice': 'http://www.rawvoice.com/rawvoiceRssModule/', 'rdf': 'http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#', 'slash': 'http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/slash/', 'sr': 'http://www.sverigesradio.se/podrss', 'sy': 'http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/', 'wfw': 'http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/',
      • iTunes (Apple)
      • Media RSS (Yahoo)
      • Simple Lists (Microsoft)
      • blogChannel (Winer)
      • TrackBack
      • Creative Commons
      • GeoRSS ( WorldKit)
      • Content
      • Syndication
      • Dublin Core (DC)
      • Google Base (Google)
      • Product RSS (Buy.com)
      • OpenSearch (A9)
      • Remote Ads (FeedShow)
      • Access (Bloglines)
      • Simple Sharing Extensions (Microsoft)
      • (coming soon)
      • Create Personal Namespace (create your own)
    1. The Library Bookshelves plugin allows you to curate virtual bookshelves just like you would a shelf around a theme in your library. Bookshelves are displayed as customizable Slick carousels, using cover art from, and links to, your library catalog. The plugin creates a Bookshelves post type, shortcode, widget, and custom taxonomy.
    1. The plugin convert content of your blog posts and pages to most popular e-book formats for readers – pdf, ePub, mobi and fb2, using php-librasries: mPDF; PHPePub; MOBIClass; bgFB2. Plugin displays a icons form for download converted files before and/or after content on your blog pages. You can create OPDS catalogue on your site with this plugin, if you enable the option. OPDS catalog support the file-types: 'epub', 'fb2', 'pdf', 'mobi', 'zip', 'rtf', 'doc', 'docx', 'htm', 'html', 'txt', 'djvu', 'mp3', 'm4a', 'm4b'.

      Q.: How can users access the OPDS catalogue?

      A.: OPDS catalogue URL http://yoursite.com/feed/opds.

    1. I’m looking forward to the first scholarly publisher that not only provides ePub files of his journal articles, but also makes them available via OPDS. Although OPDS is currently used mostly for electronic books, I think that this is a very interesting protocol for scholarly publishers.
    1. GWG, Some random thoughts:

      Your challenge question is tough, not just for the mere discovery portion, but for the multiple other functions involved, particularly a "submit/reply" portion and a separate "I want to subscribe to something for future updates".

      I can't think of any sites that do both of these functionalities at the same time. They're almost always a two step process, and quite often, after the submission part, few people ever revisit the original challenge to see further updates and follow along. The lack of an easy subscribe function is the downfall of the second part. A system that allowed one to do both a cross-site submit/subscribe simultaneously would be ideal UI, but that seems a harder problem, especially as subscribe isn't well implemented in IndieWeb spaces with a one click and done set up.

      Silo based spaces where you're subscribed to the people who might also participate might drip feed you some responses, but I don't think that even micro.blog has something that you could use to follow the daily photo challenges by does it?

      Other examples: https://daily.ds106.us/ is a good example of a sort of /planet that does regular challenges and has a back end that aggregates responses (usually from Twitter). I imagine that people are subscribed to the main feed of the daily challenges, but I don't imagine that many are subscribed to the comments feed (is there even one?)

      Maxwell's Sith Lord Challenge is one of the few I've seen in the personal site space that has aggregated responses at https://www.maxwelljoslyn.com/sithlordchallenge. I don't think it has an easy way to subscribe to the responses though an h-feed of responses on the page might work in a reader? Maybe he's got some thoughts about how this worked out.

      Ongoing challenges, like a 30 day photography challenge for example, are even harder because they're an ongoing one that either requires a central repository to collect, curate, and display them (indieweb.xyz, or a similar planet) or require something that can collect one or more of a variety of submitted feeds and then display them or allow a feed(s) of them. I've seen something like this before with http://connectedcourses.net/ in the education space using RSS, but it took some time to not only set it up but to get people's sites to work with it. (It was manual and it definitely hurt as I recall.)

      I don't think of it as a challenge, but I often submit to the IndieWeb sub on indieweb.xyz and I'm also subscribed to its output as well. In this case it works as an example since this is one of its primary functions. It's not framed as a challenge, though it certainly could be. Here one could suggest that participants tag their posts with a particular hashtag for tracking, but in IndieWeb space they'd be "tagging" their posts with the planet's particular post URL and either manually or automatically pinging the Webmention endpoint.

      Another option that could help implement some fun in the system is to salmention all the prior submissions on each submission as an update mechanism, but one would need to have a way to unsubscribe to this as it could be(come) a spam vector.

  4. Apr 2022
    1. 3. Who are you annotating with? Learning usually needs a certain degree of protection, a safe space. Groups can provide that, but public space often less so. In Hypothes.is who are you annotating with? Everybody? Specific groups of learners? Just yourself and one or two others? All of that, depending on the text you’re annotating? How granular is your control over the sharing with groups, so that you can choose your level of learning safety?

      This is a great question and I ask it frequently with many different answers.

      I've not seen specific numbers, but I suspect that the majority of Hypothes.is users are annotating in small private groups/classes using their learning management system (LMS) integrations through their university. As a result, using it and hoping for a big social experience is going to be discouraging for most.

      Of course this doesn't mean that no one is out there. After all, here you are following my RSS feed of annotations and asking these questions!

      I'd say that 95+% or more of my annotations are ultimately for my own learning and ends. If others stumble upon them and find them interesting, then great! But I'm not really here for them.

      As more people have begun using Hypothes.is over the past few years I have slowly but surely run into people hiding in the margins of texts and quietly interacted with them and begun to know some of them. Often they're also on Twitter or have their own websites too which only adds to the social glue. It has been one of the slowest social media experiences I've ever had (even in comparison to old school blogging where discovery is much higher in general use). There has been a small uptick (anecdotally) in Hypothes.is use by some in the note taking application space (Obsidian, Roam Research, Logseq, etc.), so I've seen some of them from time to time.

      I can only think of one time in the last five or so years in which I happened to be "in a text" and a total stranger was coincidentally reading and annotating at the same time. There have been a few times I've specifically been in a shared text with a small group annotating simultaneously. Other than this it's all been asynchronous experiences.

      There are a few people working at some of the social side of Hypothes.is if you're searching for it, though even their Hypothes.is presences may seem as sparse as your own at present @tonz.

      Some examples:

      @peterhagen Has built an alternate interface for the main Hypothes.is feed that adds some additional discovery dimensions you might find interesting. It highlights some frequent annotators and provide a more visual feed of what's happening on the public Hypothes.is timeline as well as data from HackerNews.

      @flancian maintains anagora.org, which is like a planet of wikis and related applications, where he keeps a list of annotations on Hypothes.is by members of the collective at https://anagora.org/latest

      @tomcritchlow has experimented with using Hypothes.is as a "traditional" comments section on his personal website.

      @remikalir has a nice little tool https://crowdlaaers.org/ for looking at documents with lots of annotations.

      Right now, I'm also in an Obsidian-based book club run by Dan Allosso in which some of us are actively annotating the two books using Hypothes.is and dovetailing some of this with activity in a shared Obsidian vault. see: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/24/55803196/. While there is a small private group for our annotations a few of us are still annotating the books in public. Perhaps if I had a group of people who were heavily interested in keeping a group going on a regular basis, I might find the value in it, but until then public is better and I'm more likely to come across and see more of what's happening out there.

      I've got a collection of odd Hypothes.is related quirks, off label use cases, and experiments: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/ including a list of those I frequently follow: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

      Like good annotations and notes, you've got to put some work into finding the social portion what's happening in this fun little space. My best recommendation to find your "tribe" is to do some targeted tag searches in their search box to see who's annotating things in which you're interested.

    2. How do you get your annotations into the rest of your workflow for notes and learning? How do you prevent that your social annotation tool is yet another separate place where one keeps stuff, cutting off the connections to the rest of one’s work and learning that would make it valuable?

      Where

      My annotations broadly flow into two spaces:

      Obsidian

      My private Obsidian-based vault is where I collect the notes and actively work on, modify, edit, and expand them if and when necessary. This is also the space where I'm broadly attempting to densely interlink them together for future use and publication in other venues. If I could, I would publish these all on the web, but I've yet to find a set up with a low enough admin tax that I can publish them inexpensively in a way I'd like them to appear (primarily with properly linked [[WikiLinks]]) while still owning them in my own space.

      I've been experimenting around with using Blot.im as a solution to display them here https://notes.boffosocko.com/, but at present it's a very limited selection of my extant notes and doesn't include Webmention or other niceties I'd like to add. As it's a very alpha stage experiment I don't recommend anyone follow or use it and it may disappear altogether in the coming months.

      WordPress

      My main website uses WordPress. To a great extent, this is (now) primarily a back up location and the majority of the annotations are unpublished to the public, but are searchable to me on the back end.

      I do, however, use it occasionally for quickly publishing and syndicating select annotations which I think others may find interesting or upon which I'm looking for comments/feedback and don't expect that the audience I'd like these from will find them natively on Hypothes.is' platform. An example of this might be a paper I was reading this weekend on Roland Barthes which discusses his reasonably well documented zettelkasten-like note taking practice. The article can be found here: https://culturemachine.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/373-604-1-PB.pdf with the annotations seen here: https://docdrop.org/pdf/The-Card-Index-as-Creativity-Ma---Wilken-Rowan-upq8g.pdf/. To tip off others in the space, I made a post on my site with a bit of a puzzle and syndicated it to Twitter. A few hours later I posted a follow up with some additional details and links to my notes on hypothesis which got some useful feedback from Matthias Melcher on the Barthes paper as well as on a related paper I mentioned by Luhmann, particularly about German translation, with which I have little facility.

      Another recent illustrative example was this annotation on the Library of Congress website about Vladimir Nabokov which was picked up by my website (though unpublished/not public) but which I syndicated to Twitter primarily to be able to send a notification to Eleanor Konik who I know is interested in the idea of World Building using historical facts and uses Obsidian in her work. (The @mention in the tweet is hiding in the image of the index card so that I could save text space in the main tweet.) Several others interested in note taking and zettelkasten for writing also noticed it and "liked" it. Not being on Hypothes.is to my knowledge much less following me there, neither Eleanor nor the others would have seen it without the Tweet.

      Nabokov used index cards for his research & writing. In one index card for Lolita, he creates a "weight-heigh-age table for girls of school age" to be able to specify Lolita's measurements. He also researched the Colt catalog of 1940. #WorldBuildinghttps://t.co/i16Yc7CbJ8 pic.twitter.com/JSjXV50L3M

      — Chris Aldrich (@ChrisAldrich) April 10, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      How

      Obsidian

      Getting annotations from Hypothes.is to Obsidian is a short two-step process which is reasonably well automated so that I don't spend a lot of time cutting/pasting/formatting.

      I start with an IFTTT recipe that takes the RSS output of Hypothes.is and creates text files directly into my Obsidian vault. The results are quite rudimentary and only include the title of the document, the permalink of the Hypothes.is post, the highlighted text, and my annotation. It doesn't include the tags as RSS doesn't have a specification for these.

      Second, I've set up Hypothesidian which has a much higher fidelity dovetail with the Hypothes.is API to get all the data and even the formatting set up I'm looking for. A reasonably well laid out set of instructions with a low/no code approach for it can be found at https://forum.obsidian.md/t/retrieve-annotations-for-hypothes-is-via-templater-plugin-hypothes-idian/17225. It allows importing annotations by a variety of methods including by date and by document URL. I've also made a small modification to it so that tags on Hypothes.is are turned into [[wikilinks]] in Obsidian instead of #tags which I only use sparingly.

      All the IFTTT annotations will be ported individually into a specific Obsidian folder where I'll process them. I can then quickly use Hypothesidian to import the properly laid out version (using templates) of the notes with just a few keystrokes and then focus my time on revising my notes if necessary and then linking them to the appropriate notes already in my system. Finally I'll move them into the appropriate folder based on their content—typically one of the following: zettelkasten, wiki, commonplace, dictionary, or sources (for bibliographic use). Careful watchers will notice that I often use Hypothes.is' "page notes" functionality to create a bookmark-like annotation into which I will frequently post the URL of the page and occasionally a summary of a piece, these are imported into my system and are used as source/bibliographic information. I also have some dovetailing with Zotero as a bibliographic set up which feeds into this data as well.

      This version which I've cobbled together works well for me so that I'm not missing anything, but there are definitely other similar processes available out there both for Obsidian (with plugins or scripts) as well as for other platforms. If I'm not mistaken, I think Readwise (a paid solution) has a set up for note transfer and formatting.

      WordPress

      As there isn't an extant Micropub client for Hypothes.is I initially used RSS as a transport layer to get my notes from Hypothes.is into WordPress. The fidelity isn't great in part because RSS doesn't include any tags. To get some slightly better presentation I set up a workflow using RSS output from Hypothes.is as input into an IFTTT workflow which outputs to a webhook that stands in as a Micropub client targeting my websites Micropub server. Some of the display on my site is assisted by using the Post Kinds plugin, which I know you've been working around yourself. The details may be above some, but I've outlined most of the broad strokes of how this is done in a tutorial at https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/21/using-ifttt-to-syndicate-pesos-content-from-social-services-to-wordpress-using-micropub/. In that example, I use the service Pocket as an example, but Hypothes.is specific information could easily be swapped out on a 1-1 basis.

      A custom stand-alone or even an integrated micropub client for Hypothes.is would be a fantastic project if someone wanted to dig into the details and dovetail it with the Hypothes.is API.

      Why

      Ideally, I'm hoping that small pieces loosely joined and IndieWeb building blocks will allow me to use the tools and have the patterns I'm looking for, without a lot of work, so that I can easily make annotations with Hypothes.is but have and share (POSSE) my content on my own site in a way that works much the way many IndieWeb sites dovetail with Twitter or Mastodon.

      I'm doing some portions of it manually at present, without a lot of overhead, but it would be fun to see someone add micropub and webmention capabilities to Hypothes.is or other IndieWeb building blocks. (I suspect it won't be Hypothes.is themselves as their team is very small and they're already spread thin on multiple other mission critical projects.)

      In the end, I'm using Hypothes.is as a well designed and convenient tool for quickly making notes on digital documents. All the data is flowing to one of two other locations where I'm actually making use of it. While there is some social layer there, I'm getting email notifications through the Hypothes.is settings and the data from my responses just gets rolled back into my spaces which I try to keep open and IndieWeb friendly by default. At the same time, for those who want or need it, Hypothes.is' interface is a great way of reading, searching, sorting, and interacting with my notes in public, particularly until I get something specific and user friendly up to do it on my own domain.

  5. Mar 2022
    1. 通过 Hypothesis 创建的公开批注可以通过 RSS 地址 https://hypothes.is/stream.rss?user=<username> 订阅
    1. https://opml.glitch.me/

      Get websites and RSS Feeds of the people you follow on Twitter. Import the OPML-file with your favorite feedreader. Examples: Feedly, Inoreader Tiny Tiny RSS, NewsBlur.

  6. Feb 2022
    1. The RssCloud Application Programming Interface (API) is an XML-RPC, SOAP 1.1 and REST web service that enables client software to be notified of updates to RSS documents. A server (called the "cloud") takes notification requests for particular RSS documents.
  7. Jan 2022
    1. Sign up any RSS/Atom feed as a public news group.

      Gwene is an RSS (and Atom, etc) to Usenet News (i. e., NNTP) gateway.

      [...]

      Sign up single feeds or add all your feeds by uploading an OPML file.

    Tags

    Annotators

    URL

  8. Dec 2021
  9. Nov 2021
    1. https://collect.readwriterespond.com/antennapod/

      I feel your pain here Aaron.

      Perhaps it helps, perhaps not, but I've been using AntennaPod for a few years now. In particular I love it on Android because I can use the share functionality to share to a custom email address which posts to reading.am for an account that aggregates everything I'm listening to. Then I port the RSS feed of that back into my site. It's a stupid amount of manual work, but it mostly works.

      Alternately you could share material you listen to to Huffduffer and pull data out that way as well. My problem here is that Huffduffer is more of a bookmark service than a "listened to this" sort of service, though you could always add a "listened" tag to the things you've heard in the past.

      The tougher part of all this is that podcasts have "canonical" links for the podcast episodes (sometimes) and an entirely different link for the audio file which has no meta data attached to it (presuming you can even find the URL for the audio file to begin with.)

      AntennaPod allows you to pick and choose what you want to share, so usually I default to the audio file to get that in to the workflow and finding/adding the data for the particular episode is a bit easier.

      I will say that this is one of the ugliest and most labor intensive workflows I've got for social posts, so I'm usually only doing it and posting publicly for things that I really think are worth the time that make for interesting notes/observations that go along with the post.

      I'm curious to see what others come up with for this workflow.

  10. Oct 2021
  11. Aug 2021
    1. I'm wondering exactly what problem that LOUD standard is meant to be solving exactly? It doesn't appear that any of the meta data they're listing is over and above anything that's already extant?

      If you're going to propose a new set up, why not add some bits to fix the newer problems that have popped up like for paying creators? Being able to inject ads? Better track the number of listens? How far into the file did the listener get? How many ads did they hear?

      And let's not forget:

  12. Jul 2021
    1. The contemporary email newsletter is not a novel form; often it amounts to a new delivery system for the same sorts of content — essays, explainers, Q&As, news roundups, advice, and lists — that have long been staples of online media. (Subscribe to enough newsletters and sort them the right way, and it’s possible to re-create something like an RSS-feed reader.)

      Email delivery apparently isn't much different than RSS. What sorts of functionality do RSS readers provide over email in terms of search, filtering, and presentation? Surely RSS is more powerful at slicing and dicing one's reader data.

      How do all these different forms of content fit into the greater set of genres in Western culture?

  13. May 2021
    1. Books and OER distributed by RSS. OPML lists creating collections for specific purposes - courses, discussion lists, whatever. RSS readers like gRSShopper using these OPML files to aggregate the contents and present them inside the student's own integrated learning environment. And then these - chapters, resources, comments, etc. - shared through the network among people taking the same course, working in the same community, or associated in any other way.

      This is roughly what I'd been thinking when reading Tonz' work on OPML recently as well. OPML could be used for quite a lot more and when paired with dumping things into a reader environment could be incredibly powerful.

    1. This is a solidly comprehensive overview of much of what I'd want in my own personal reader. I'll have to revisit it as I'm reading and using other readers to see if there are any other pieces missing.

      Being able to sort by social distance, by community/tags, and by posting frequency and/or post type (ie separating articles from notes from bookmarks, etc) would be some of the bigger must haves.

    1. Inclusion however is a concept in OPML: I can add a list as a new branch in another list. If you do that once you only clone a list, and go your own seperate way again. You could also do it dynamically, where you always re-import the other list into your own. Doing it dynamically is a de-facto subscription. For both however, changes in the imported list are non-obvious.

      When this is done with RSS, you have what is known as OPML subscription. Some feed readers like Inoreader let you subscribe to someone's OPML list of RSS feeds which means your feed reader will autoupdate to show you new feeds from the list you've subscribed to.

      Ha! I'm noticing you mention it in the next section! :)

  14. Apr 2021
    1. After the recent brouhaha at Basecamp (context: https://www.platformer.news/p/-what-really-happened-at-basecamp), a great example of someone using their own domain because they didn't want the bad press of a silo/platform to stick to them

  15. Mar 2021
    1. Some interesting, but small subtleties between Atom and RSS described here. So few people dig into these things at this level anymore.

  16. Feb 2021
    1. Small world of annotation enthusiasts, but hopefully getting bigger!

      I've always wished that Hypothes.is had some additional social features built in for discovering and following others, but they do have just enough for those who are diligent.

      I've written a bit about how to follow folks and tags using a feed reader.

      And if you want some quick links or even an OPML feed of people and material I'm following on Hypothesis: https://boffosocko.com/about/following/#Hypothesis%20Feeds

  17. Jan 2021
  18. Dec 2020
    1. Running under systemd You can setup the daemon as a simple systemd service like this: [Unit] Description=ttrss_backend After=network.target mysql.service postgresql.service [Service] User=www-data ExecStart=/path/to/tt-rss/update_daemon2.php [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target Use journalctl -u ttrss_backend to look through daemon console output.
    1. Upgrading with Git Update base tt-rss code Change to tt-rss directory on your server and run git pull origin master.
  19. Nov 2020
  20. Oct 2020
    1. Because I’m old, I still have my students set up Feedly accounts and plug in the RSS feeds of their classmates and hopefully add other blogs to their feeds as well. And like blogging, I realize only a handful will continue but I want to expose them to the power of sharing their own research/learning via blogging and how to find others who do as well via Feedly.
    1. Podcast listening can be harder to crack. There are so many shows! How do you find the ones you’ll like? And once you’ve found a show, where do you start: with the most recent episode? At the beginning? Some specific gem of an episode buried deep in the back catalog?

      Perhaps start with making the RSS feeds easily discoverable?! I just spent 20 minutes doing some reasonably serious web gymnastics to extract the RSS feed for Caliphate (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/podcasts/caliphate-isis-rukmini-callimachi.html) out of the iTunes feed using a JSON request tactic. Why can't the podcast's main page have or advertise the raw RSS feed?!

    1. A return to RSS or is there something else again in the development of the web?

      There are other options out there, though in many cases distribution is uneven. There are new specs like JSONFeed which many sites and feed readers support just in the last year.

      There are also simpler methods than RSS now including the microformats-based h-feed which one can use to create a simple feed that many feed readers will support.

      Part of RSS's ubiquity is that it is simply so prevalent that most common CMSs still support it. The fact that the idea of RSS is so old and generally un-evolving means there isn't a lot of maintenance involved once it's been set up.

    1. it’s just an XML file

      But it's still an additional side file to maintain versus something simpler like microformats' use of an h-feed.

    1. It wasn’t just that the headlines, free-floating, decontextualized motes of journalism ginned up to trigger reflexive mouse clicks, had displaced the stories. It was that the whole organizing structure of the newspaper, its epistemological architecture, had been junked. The news section (with its local, national, and international subsections), the sports section, the arts section, the living section, the opinion pages: they’d all been fed through a shredder, then thrown into a wind tunnel. What appeared on the screen was a jumble, high mixed with low, silly with smart, tragic with trivial. The cacophony of the RSS feed, it’s now clear, heralded a sea change in the distribution and consumption of information. The new order would be disorder.

      How can we design against this sort of disorder?

  21. Sep 2020
    1. As we move away from the centralised web to the peer web, it’s time to rediscover, re-embrace, and reclaim RSS. Everything old is new again. RSS was an essential part of Web 1.0 before surveillance capitalism (Web 2.0) took over.

      Ik hoop oprecht dat de slimme mensen in de decentralized web-community er voor kiezen om RSS niet op dezelfde manier te promoten zoals in het begin van deze eeuw. Dat zorgde nu niet bepaald voor veel begrip en (blijvend) gebruik. RSS is een prachtig stuk internet-pijpleiding waar veel meer mee mogelijk is dan alleen lezen in een andere app. Juist door het decentraal te maken en te houden.

  22. May 2020
    1. You can get an RSS or Atom feed for annotations made at a specific url, a specific Hypothesis tag or group, or for a specific Hypothesis user.

      Domain-level query is also available with RSS and Atom feeds. This tool here makes the process of getting these feed urls a bit easier.

  23. Apr 2020
  24. Mar 2020
    1. Pocket Casts is instead committed to podcasting’s open ecosystem of freely available RSS feeds, CEO Owen Grover says.

      I wish their app allowed one to actually use the podcast's native URL(s) when sharing instead of providing a pca.st shortened URL.

  25. Dec 2019
    1. And I am planning on cutting back on my personal use of social media (easier said than done) and want to try to return to using my blog more than Twitter for sharing.

      certainly a laudable goal!

      It helped me a lot to simply delete most of the social media apps off of my phone. I scribbled a bit about the beginning of the process back in November and there's a link there to a post by Ben doing the same thing on his own website.

      More people are leaving social feeds for RSS feeds lately. I've recently started following Jeremy Felt who is taking this same sort of journey himself. See: https://jeremyfelt.com/tag/people-still-blog/

      Kudos as well to making the jump here:

      Taking a bit of a Twitter break. I'm going to try to stay off until the new year, but likely lack the willpower to stay off for more than a few hours. Wish me luck!<br><br>....but silently. Not via reply to to this tweet. Cause that'll just suck me back into the vortext.

      — Clint Lalonde (he/him) (@edtechfactotum) December 19, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      In part, it's what prompted me to visit your site to write a comment. (Sorry for upping your cis-gendered white male count, but 2019 was a bad year, and hopefully we can all make 2020 better as you've indicated.)

    1. Lately though, its been making a bit of a comeback. Idea being that self-selecting your daily information diet (see: No Trump-loving-creepy-brothers-in-laws) probably means less unwilling toxicity and restless nights of non-sleep.
  26. Feb 2019
    1. The feed readers. Just as the RSS standard spawned lots of “reader” and “aggregator” software, so there should be similar feed readers for the various data standards described in (1) and the publishers described in (2). While publishers might have built-in readers (as the social media giants all do), the publishing and reading feature sets need to be kept independent, if you want a completely decentralized system.

      I've outlined a bit about how feed readers could be slighly modified to do some of this in the past: https://boffosocko.com/2017/06/09/how-feed-readers-can-grow-market-share-and-take-over-social-media/

    2. The social media browser plugins. Here’s the killer feature. Create at least one (could be many competing) browser plugins that enable you to (a) select feeds and then (b) display them alongside a user’s Twitter, Facebook, etc., feeds. (This could be an adaptation of Greasemonkey.) In other words, once this feature were available, you could tell your friends: “I’m not on Twitter. But if you want to see my Tweet-like posts appear in your Twitter feed, then simply install this plugin and input my feed address. You’ll see my posts pop up just as if they were on Twitter. But they’re not! And we can do this because you can control how any website appears to you from your own browser. It’s totally legal and it’s actually a really good idea.” In this way, while you might never look at Twitter or Facebook, you can stay in contact with your friends who are still there—but on your own terms.

      This is an intriguing idea. In particular, it would be cool if I could input my OPML file of people I'm following and have a plugin like this work with other social readers.

  27. Dec 2018
    1. Where’s my Net dashboard?

      Interestingly, I came to this post in my feed reader while randomly looking for something I could use as an example in something I was writing about feed readers!!!

    2. It’s not just that the silos can shut down their feeds. It’s that we allowed ourselves to get herded into them in the first place.
  28. Oct 2018
  29. Jul 2018
    1. I also value reading a person’s blog over time to understand better their voice and context. So I’m asking for some advice on how to update my module on finding research. What replaces RSS feeds? What works for you that goes beyond “someone on Twitter/Facebook shared….” to something that is more focused and intentional?
    1. <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" href="http://scripting.com/rss.xml">#

      A meta tag to put into the header to support RSS discovery.

  30. Apr 2018
  31. Mar 2018
    1. by URL All annotations on Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Letter to my Son Atom: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?uri=http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/07/tanehisi-coates-between-the-world-and-me/397619/ RSS: https://hypothes.is/stream.rss?uri=http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/07/tanehisi-coates-between-the-world-and-me/397619/ by Tag All annotations tagged edu305 Atom: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?tags=edu305 RSS: https://hypothes.is/stream.rss?tags=edu305 by User Paul Allison’s annotations Atom: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=paulallison RSS: https://hypothes.is/stream.rss?user=paulallison

      Excellent way to add users and tags to the Fediverse (the federation of free networks) -- through Friendica's RSS functionality.

  32. Feb 2016
    1. RSS signifie « Really Simple Syndication », « Rich Site Summary » ou encore « Rapid Site Summary ». Un flux RSS, quant à lui, est un fichier XML lié à un site web et qui est mis à jour régulièrement, dès que ledit site poste un nouvel article.

      Specification accessible ici:

      http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/rss/rss.html