140 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Research shows that people are highly likely to revisit information they have viewed in the past and to re-issue queries that they have written in the past (Jones et al., 2002, Milic-Frayling et al., 2004). In one large study, 40% of people's search results clicks were on pages that they had clicked on before over the course of a year, with 71% of these using the identical query string as before (Teevan et al., 2006a). In a survey associated with this study, 17% of interviewees reported “not being able to return to a page I once visited” as one of the “biggest problems in using the web.” Therefore, allowing search over recently viewed information can improve a user's productivity (Dumais et al., 2003). Web browsers, as opposed to search engines, can provide much of this functionality. For example, the Chrome Web browser supports information revisiting by showing a grid of thumbnail images representing a user's most frequently visited web pages, and the drop-down menu from the many browser Web address bars shows recently visited pages. Search engines themselves can provide query history, as well as history of previously selected pages if the user agrees to having that information recorded. The PubMed bioscience journal service shows recently issued queries and visited documents in a simple history display (see Figure 1.6). Similarly, many shopping Web site show recently viewed items in a graphical form. Thumbnail images have also been experimented with in search results listing, both for reminding searchers of previously visited pages and for suggesting information about the hit, such as its genre.
    1. Look, nobody was flipping through pages on your blog to find anything anyway, so it's fine.

      so true...

      but I do search on my own site frequently...

  2. Aug 2020
    1. What is Search, Anyway?Steam Search does more than just looking up games; it's a powerful tool that drives many of our discoverability features, including Top Sellers and Specials pages. Today's features are available anywhere the Search tool is used across the store.
  3. Jul 2020
  4. Jun 2020
    1. ow many hours did you spend customizing, configuring, or otherwise optimizing your site search in the past month?
  5. May 2020
    1.  I often find myself saying, “I saved something about that…somewhere…<img class="emoji" role="img" draggable="false" src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/svg/1f914.svg" alt="🤔">“ Here’s what that looks like:  <img width="777" height="468" src="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Roam Digital Garden Second Brain" srcset="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg 777w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-300x181.jpg 300w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-768x463.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 777px) 100vw, 777px">

      I have had this issue with my data spread over multiple sites and services and not easily searchable.

      Unless one can buy into a single system, it may be an eternal problem...

    1. Cloze deletion is, of course, just a fancy way of saying fill in the blank. This might sound trivial, but the simple act forces you to consider the surrounding context and search your mind for an answer. This, in turn, is scientifically proven to form stronger memories enabling you to remember profoundly more of what you've read.
  6. Apr 2020
  7. Mar 2020
    1. I don’t want to build yet another Podcast player app. I don’t want to trap listeners to Listen Notes. You come to Listen Notes and find the Podcasts or Podcast Episodes that you want to listen, then you leave Listen Notes to use your favorite Podcast player app to listen. Under this principle, Listen Notes shows RSS & brings traffic back to official websites of Podcasts. Many Podcast-related sites don’t show RSS, because they want to build a walled garden to make visitors stay there as long as possible.
    1. the link operator was only designed to return a small sampling of backlinks to prevent SEOs from reverse engineering another site’s rankings
    2. To find a sampling of links to any site, you can perform a Google search using the link: operator. For instance, [link:www.google.com] will list a selection of the web pages that have links pointing to the Google home page
    1. Yes, it’s been deprecated. Why? Because too few people were using it to make it worth the time, money, and energy to maintain. In truth, although I sometimes disagree with the operator changes, I happen to agree with this one. Maintaining ALL of the synonyms takes real time and costs us real money. Supporting this operator also increases the complexity of the code base. By dropping support for it we can free up a bunch of resources that can be used for other, more globally powerful changes.
    1. The <meta name="robots" content="noindex" /> tag or directive applies to search engine crawlers. To block non-search crawlers, such as AdsBot-Google, you might need to add directives targeted to the specific crawler
    1. For the noindex directive to be effective, the page must not be blocked by a robots.txt file. If the page is blocked by a robots.txt file, the crawler will never see the noindex directive, and the page can still appear in search results, for example if other pages link to it.
  8. Jan 2020
    1. Now, Google has to change its practices and prompt users to choose their own default search engine when setting up a European Android device that has the Google Search app built in. Not all countries will have the same options, however, as the choices included in Google’s new prompt all went to the highest bidders.As it turns out, DuckDuckGo must have bid more aggressively than other Google competitors, as it’s being offered as a choice across all countries in the EU.
  9. Dec 2019
    1. Note, too, the implications extending from Bush's mention of one user duplicating a trail (a portion of his structure) and giving it to a friend who can put it into his Memex and integrate it into his own trail (structure).
  10. Aug 2019
  11. Jul 2019
    1. I do not actually know of a real findability index, but tools in the field of information retrieval could be applied to develop one. One of the unsolved problems in the field is how to help the searcher to determine if the information simply is not available.
    2. Although some have written about information overload, data smog, and the like, my view has always been the more information online, the better, so long as good search tools are available. Sometimes this information is found by directed search using a web search engine, sometimes by serendipty by following links, and sometimes by asking hundreds of people in our social network or hundreds of thousands of people on a question answering website such as Answers.com, Quora, or Yahoo Answer
    1. Compared with neural networks configured by a pure grid search,we find that random search over the same domain is able to find models that are as good or betterwithin a small fraction of the computation time.
  12. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu citeseerx.ist.psu.edu
    1. faceted sea

      it's a technique which involves augmenting traditional search techniques with a faceted navigation system, allowing users to narrow down search results by applying multiple filters based on faceted classification of the items

  13. Jun 2019
    1. This is why annotation matters.

      Google has accelerated this by using search to better link pieces of knowledge in the modern world, but scholars have been linking thoughts manually for centuries.

  14. May 2019
    1. mightthosewhoareintheminorityeverbeabletoinfluenceorcontrolthewaytheyarerepresentedinasearchengine?

      If the majority rules search engine results, the majority could also rule over the content. if the majority of the online population are sexist, then the majority of the results when searching even a simple/general term such as "cars" could be more searched by men, but also have more content created by men, especially men who are "middle class" or higher who could afford to purchase a car and own a technology capable of using a search engine.

      It makes me think... What searches would come from people who were struggling financially and did not usually have access to a computer? What would they search first? And how would that impact the popular searches and content?

      The majority of Canada's populace are not low income, but what would happen to results in other countries (or even ours)where low income is the majority, and they were all given access to search technologies?

  15. Feb 2019
  16. Oct 2018
  17. Sep 2018
    1. Then, venturing further into the store: this is what we happen to have.

      I'm also reminded here of the idea of serendipity. Perhaps I go into a library looking for a specific topic and browse to that section via Dewey decimal. What about the serendipity of finding something interesting in that same section (or even nearby sections) that I wasn't specifically looking for?

      Google's search ranking rarely if ever unearths this sort of serendipitous material.

  18. Aug 2018
    1. Mastodon deliberately does not support arbitrary search. If someone wants their message to be discovered, they can use a hashtag, which can be browsed. What does arbitrary search accomplish? People and brands search for their own name to self-insert into conversations they were not invited to. What you can do, however, is search messages you posted, received or favourited. That way you can find that one message on the tip of your tongue.
  19. Jul 2018
    1. A good resource to keep in mind for future lessons:) Found this website using a custom google search engine

    1. Using information technology has become an important skill for students and employees. As a teacher wishing to use the Internet your options are typically to either provide students with specific links or have them “Google” to find information on the Internet. Using Google can yield interesting and unexpected results. Creating a list of specific links is time consuming and does not teach the students how to search the web.

      This is a good point- typically teachers either give students a list of links or let them use google free reign. Creating a custom google search engine for the class may help

  20. Jun 2018
    1. (Remember when every news site published the piece, “What Time Is the Super Bowl?”)

      This is a great instance for Google's box that simply provides the factual answer instead of requiring a click through.

    1. "Information retrieval is not about finding how much tannin there is in an apple," he declared in his San Francisco office. "It's about letting everyone publish." With that, he was off on a long rant about how organizing the Web matters, because, as Architext's Spencer had told me, "it's about people finding people, not people finding information." Indexing the Web allows the 40 people interested in Bulgarian folksinging to find each other, it allows fans of long-forgotten TV shows to get together and reminisce. It creates communities.
  21. May 2018
    1. Ironically, DWYL reinforces exploitation even within the so-called lovable professions where off-the-clock, underpaid, or unpaid labor is the new norm:

      Doing what you love, isolates and degrades other workforces and elevates others and more so, the ones of higher economic class. One should be paid fair dues as per their work and have good working conditions. She wants people to realize that they deserve goods jobs and they should never settle for less in the name of doing what they love.

    2. limits

      The article argues different theories regarding doing what is right, with the bigger question being is it wrong for people to strive to be able to do what they love. But, at the same time, what is the limit of people seeking what they love without overstepping the boundaries?

  22. Apr 2018
    1. It’s striking that we likely have author information provided as metadata on the majority of articles published today, but almost none of our reading tools expose this information in useful ways, or let us search or explore using the metadata.

      This is a really really important point.

  23. Mar 2018
  24. Feb 2018
  25. Dec 2017
    1. Still at a starting point, we have neither ‘advanced’ nor remained unmoved.

      The cover of Ken Macrorie's textbook, The I-Search Paper, has a moebius strip on it, reflecting this sentiment nicely.<br>

      But the conceit of the moebius strip extends from the back cover as well

      So, you start reading this book on the back cover, nice twist, just like in a moebius strip. You work through the text by doing. Then when you are done, you get to the end and out the back of the book you go onto the back cover, to enter again. Escher would approve. That is what I see happening here. In the end this process serves the product, the text that is produced for anyone concerned.

  26. Nov 2017
    1. having students do a basic Google image search for terms like “doctor” “teacher” “baby”

      It may sound obvious but it actually works. Just did it with each of these three words (on DuckDuckGo) and the results, though unsurprising, bring home the point. Tried switching on the Canadian filter, to check if their might be a difference, and it mostly reorders the results, for some reason. Also tried “student” and “musician” which provide an interesting contrast. Doing this exercise in class, would probably start by asking learners to write down what they expect to get. (Might even do it in my applied anthro class, tomorrow.)

    2. In this particular case, Google worked as a kind of amplifier of distortion.
    1. As an index, people have different expectations on search result neutrality. Some want Google Search to be entirely neutral, some demand immediate action to remove some results. The European Union has both demanded GOOG to comply with removal requests, and fined GOOG for not being neutral in shopping queries. It is not beneficial for GOOG to assume the role of an impartial arbiter of content, since it’s not supporting their business model. Quite the contrary, they are under public scrutiny from multiple governments, potentially risking their reputation.
  27. Oct 2017
    1. People tend to believe what the read on the web, whether it is true or not. Public opinion can easily be swayed with misinformation whether accidental or intentional. One must rely on trustworthy and reliable sources before coming to a conclusion on any subject.

      I agree with Nancy that information people find on the Internet may not be as useful and it can be falsified. An example would be Wikipedia as any person could modify the content of the information in it.

    2. Trends have been incorporated into the search engine rankings that determine what pages rise to the top of the list. The positive impact is search results that show the most likely needed pages at the top of the list. The negative impact is having the algorithm making assumptions of what is wanted.

      I agree with Nancy. These pages that are ranked higher are only based on assumptions from the search algorithm due to the fact that the website are from notable corporations/company and are linked to a lot of other other websites. However, the credibility of its contents may not come from an expert or whatsoever.

    3. Yes, I agree. People are depending too much on the ability to “Google” information instead of learning it. Although being able to search for any information you may need is convenient, knowledge that used to be considered basic need-to-know information is no longer considered so. Take for instance changing a flat tire. How many people under the age of 40 can tell you how to do it, without “Googling” it?

      I completely agree with you. After the popularity of Google rose, the reliance on convenient and fast information increased. Many millennials lack the skill of performing research without Google or an online search engine/

    1. No, it should not. Information is so easily changed, altered, and manipulated by other users that you can never trust a search engine completely. It is important that researchers should never trust only one search engine and get the facts from a few different places.

      I said the same thing. If researchers are getting there information for the internet then we dont know whats true.

    1. I personally delete my search history because I don’t like people knowing my business.

      I understand this and it makes a lot of sense. People think everything that is theres is always safe.

    1. The difference between Figure 4.10 and Figure 4.11 is that Figure 4.10 is uncensored while figure 4.11 is censored. There are differences even though they are both a Google search is because the Chinese government does not want certain information to be released to the public. While from the U.S point of view, nothing is censored because there are certain laws which prevent the government from censoring certain content.

      It is very interesting to have the opportunity to compare and contrast what online searches look like online in different parts of the world. It is unfortunate to see that places like China do not have the freedoms of accessing any information that they are curious about, however, it should inspire us to take advantage of what liberties we have on the Internet.

    1. I agree, people at this day in age are turning to the internet for information. We rather look something up on the internet than going to the library to find out more information about something. Searching things via the Internet is our future.

      I also agree with what Caroline had to say about the claim of search engines changing the way we think. With information becoming so easily accessible, people can be seen as getting lazier with accessing information.

    1. I agree. People now depend on the Internet for every little tidbit of information. They also assume that the information is always correct. This changes how we access information (through computers and phones instead of books and encyclopedias) and how we perceive it (less emphasis on source and more emphasis on it’s location on the web pages).

      I agree, the internet now a days is being used in so many different situations. No one is going to just go to the library in order to find out more information about something when they can just look it up on the internet in a quick second. The ability of searching a lot of information in a short period of time and having it in one place is very useful. People do not need to look for hours upon hours to find one concise answer, they just need to search it on the internet.

  28. Sep 2017
    1. You don’t go to Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, or Instagram because you’re looking for something, rather, you want to see what it has found for you.

      This is a critical distinction.

    1. These analyses offer a theory-motivated method of gauging collaborative search efficiency beyondthe analysis of mean RTs

      This is interesting!

  29. Jul 2017
  30. Jun 2017
    1. we’re at a pivotal point not just in the life of our democracy, but in how we think, read, and make choices. Selective information is being presented to us in a way that encourages selective reading and offers psychological and social rewards for, to put it bluntly, being stupid and submissive and spreading stupid to submit others.

      ...

      What’s different now is that this propaganda is being gamed by professionals in a massive, orchestrated data campaign at a volume, pace, and consistency that not only muddies the truth, but completely eclipses the truth. Destroys the very notion of truth.

      ...

      The truth about the truth is that we believe because we want to, because our ability to think independently is a point of pride for Americans. The people behind the curtain are telling us the same story we tell ourselves about ourselves. But this is also a vulnerability: Independence is in its purist form a kind of division. If you exploit it the right way, you can turn a democracy against itself.

  31. May 2017
  32. citeseerx.ist.psu.edu citeseerx.ist.psu.edu
    1. Faster Approximate String Matching Baeza-Yates and G. Navarro, R. Algorithmica (1999) 23: 127. doi:10.1007/PL00009253


  33. Apr 2017
    1. Google is countering fake news and extremism by updating their search rankings, and taking direct feedback from users.

    1. Google is adding a Fact Check feature to Google Search and Google News. When fact checks are available from one or more approved publishers, they will appear in the search results.

      One requirement for publishers to be cited is to use the schema.org ClaimReview markup, or the Share the Facts widget.

  34. Feb 2017
    1. Imagine searching for “401k matching” and instead of just receiving relevant messages or files, you also get a list of people in HR that can answer your question, or a list of channels for your query where you might be able to find the information you are looking for, or even a list of commonly asked questions relevant to that topic with links to the channel where each one was answered.

      This would be good.

    2. Relevant search relaxes the age constraint and takes into account the Lucene score of the document — how well it matches the query terms (Solr powers search at Slack).

      Relevant

    3. Recent search finds the messages that match all terms, and presents them in reverse chronological order.

      Recent

    4. On average, 20% of a knowledge worker’s day is spent looking for the information they need to get their work done.

      Wow!

  35. Jan 2017
    1. doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to design and create better versions that maximize the benefits while minimizing the problems

      Who are these mythical platform developers? And why wouldn't they follow in the footsteps of the very profitable publishers?

    1. Boolean satisfiability problem

      This is just one specific type of the classes of satisfiability problems (a.k.a. search problems).

      Other related problems include: Linear equation satisfiability, Linear inequality satisfiability, 0-1 integer linear equation satisfiability.

      Given the current context (of search problems), all the above are known as NP problems in general (with the observation, that the classic definition of NP limited the scope to only YES-NO problems).

      One can think of search problems as "one of many ways of characterizing the set of problems that form the basis of the study of intractability". Other ways include viewing such problems through the lenses of decision problems or optimization problems. In other words, problems in any of the aforementioned types can be translated between (or more formally, reduced to) each other with relative ease.

      Source(s): http://algs4.cs.princeton.edu/66intractability/