15 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
  2. Aug 2018
  3. May 2018
  4. Oct 2017
    1. MySQL’s replication architecture means that if bugs do cause table corruption, the problem is unlikely to cause a catastrophic failure.

      I can't follow the reasoning here. I guess it's not guaranteed to replicate the corruption like Postgres would, but it seems totally possible to trigger similar or identical corruption because the implementation of the logical statement would be similar on the replica.

    2. The bug we ran into only affected certain releases of Postgres 9.2 and has been fixed for a long time now. However, we still find it worrisome that this class of bug can happen at all. A new version of Postgres could be released at any time that has a bug of this nature, and because of the way replication works, this issue has the potential to spread into all of the databases in a replication hierarchy.

      Not really a criticism of Postgres so much as it is a criticism of software in general.

  5. Aug 2017
  6. Jun 2016
    1. If the RRID is well-formed, and if the lookup found the right record, a human validator tags it a valid RRID — one that can now be associated mechanically with occurrences of the same resource in other contexts. If the RRID is not well-formed, or if the lookup fails to find the right record, a human validator tags the annotation as an exception and can discuss with others how to handle it. If an RRID is just missing, the validator notes that with another kind of exception tag.

      Sounds a lot like the way reference managers work. In many cases, people keep the invalid or badly-formed results.

  7. Apr 2016
  8. Jan 2016
  9. Dec 2015
    1. Data gathering is ubiquitous in science. Giant databases are currently being minedfor unknown patterns, but in fact there are many (many) known patterns that simplyhave not been catalogued. Consider the well-known case of medical records. A patient’smedical history is often known by various individual doctor-offices but quite inadequatelyshared between them. Sharing medical records often means faxing a hand-written noteor a filled-in house-created form between offices.
    2. I will use a mathematical tool calledologs, or ontology logs, to givesome structure to the kinds of ideas that are often communicated in pictures like theone on the cover. Each olog inherently offers a framework in which to record data aboutthe subject. More precisely it encompasses adatabase schema, which means a system ofinterconnected tables that are initially empty but into which data can be entered.
  10. May 2015
  11. Oct 2014
    1. This in turn means that Redis Cluster does not have to take meta data in the data structures in order to attempt a value merge, and that the fancy commands and data structures supported by Redis are also supported by Redis Cluster. So no additional memory overhead, no API limits, no limits in the amount of elements a value can contain, but less safety during partitions.

      A solid trade-off, I think, and says a lot about the intended use cases.

  12. Sep 2014
    1. Fast restart. If a server is temporarily taken down, this capability restores the index from a saved copy, eliminating delays due to index rebuilding.

      This point seems to be in direct contradiction to the claim above that "Indexes (primary and secondary) are always stored in DRAM for fast access and are never stored on Solid State Drives (SSDs) to ensure low wear."

    2. Unlike other databases that use the linux file system that was built for rotational drives, Aerospike has implemented a log structured file system to access flash – raw blocks on SSDs – directly.

      Does this really mean to suggest that Aerospike bypasses the linux block device layer? Is there a kernel driver? Does this mean I can't use any filesystem I want and know how to administrate? Is the claim that the "linux file system" (which I take to mean, I guess, the virtual file system layer) "built for rotation drives" even accurate? We've had ram disks for a long, long time. And before that we've had log structured filesystems, too, and even devices that aren't random access like tape drives. Seems like dubious claims all around.