149 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Supply chains—starting with the factories upstream, running through the ports and rail yards and warehouses, and ending with retail—are large and complex systems. These systems need to be adaptive, and yet the news shows us they are not. 

      We need supply chains to route around problems in the same way that packets on the internet route around bottlenecks and broken connections.

  2. Jun 2021
  3. May 2021
  4. Apr 2021
    1. This looks fascinating. I'm not so much interested in the coding/programming part as I am the actual "working in public" portions as they relate to writing, thinking, blogging in the open and sharing that as part of my own learning and growth as well as for sharing that with a broader personal learning network. I'm curious what lessons might be learned within this frame or how educators and journalists might benefit from it.

    1. Others are asking questions about the politics of weblogs – if it’s a democratic medium, they ask, why are there so many inequalities in traffic and linkage?

      This still exists in the social media space, but has gotten even worse with the rise of algorithmic feeds.

  5. Mar 2021
    1. he Cyborg Manifesto, Donna Haraway talks about the possibility of networks. While the Facebook of 2021 strings us out along a spectrum and pushes us to either end, Haraway’s conception of a network in 1985 is “the profusion of space and identities and the permeability of boundaries in the personal body and the body politic.” I

      An interesting data point in the evolution of networks

    1. Particularly striking in 1971 was his call for advanced technology to support "learning webs": The operation of a peer-matching network would be simple. The user would identify himself by name and address and describe the activity for which he sought a peer. A computer would send him back the names and addresses of all those who had inserted the same description. It is amazing that such a simple utility has never been used on a broad scale for publicly valued activity.
  6. Feb 2021
    1. Cytoscape is an open source software platform for visualizing complex networks and integrating these with any type of attribute data. A lot of Apps are available for various kinds of problem domains, including bioinformatics, social network analysis, and semantic web.
  7. Jan 2021
  8. Dec 2020
    1. If you look at the same graph with distance 2, the layer of additionally visible nodes show how my new Notion might be connected to things like online identity, using the environment to store memory and layered access to information. This triggers additional thoughts during the writing process.

      Lovely. This is such a great insight that I can already see is going to help me a lot.

  9. Oct 2020
    1. In at least one instance, a foreign adversary was able to take advantage of a back door invented by U.S. intelligence, according to Juniper Networks Inc, which said in 2015 its equipment had been compromised. In a previously unreported statement to members of Congress in July seen by Reuters, Juniper said an unnamed national government had converted the mechanism first created by the NSA.

      NSA gets Juniper to put a backdoor in one of their products. The product gets compromised by a foreign government in 2015.

    1. Workplace Learning in Informal Networks

      Milligan, C., Littlejohn, A., & Margaryan, A. (2014). Workplace Learning in Informal Networks. Journal of Interactive Media in Education.

      Learning does not stop when an individual leaves formal education, but becomes increasingly informal, and deeply embedded within other activities such as work. This article describes the challenges of informal learning in knowledge intensive industries, highlighting the important role of personal learning networks. The article argues that knowledge workers must be able to self-regulate their learning and outlines a range of behaviours that are essential to effective learning in informal networks. The article identifies tools that can support these behaviours in the workplace and how they might form a personal work and learning environment.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1034717&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      7/10

    1. Newport is an academic — he makes his primary living teaching computer science at a university, so he already has a built-in network and a self-contained world with clear moves towards achievement.

      This is one of the key reasons people look to social media--for the connections and the network they don't have via non-digital means. Most of the people I've seen with large blogs or well-traveled websites have simply done a much better job of connecting and interacting with their audience and personal networks. To a great extent this is because they've built up a large email list to send people content directly. Those people then read their material and comment on their blogs.

      This is something the IndieWeb can help people work toward in a better fashion, particularly with better independent functioning feed readers.

    1. That is to say: if the problem has not been the centralized, corporatized control of the individual voice, the individual’s data, but rather a deeper failure of sociality that precedes that control, then merely reclaiming ownership of our voices and our data isn’t enough. If the goal is creating more authentic, more productive forms of online sociality, we need to rethink our platforms, the ways they function, and our relationships to them from the ground up. It’s not just a matter of functionality, or privacy controls, or even of business models. It’s a matter of governance.
    1. Thought leader and tech executive, John Ryan, provided valuable historical context both onstage and in his recent blog. He compared today’s social media platforms to telephone services in 1900. Back then, a Bell Telephone user couldn’t talk to an AT&T customer; businesses had to have multiple phone lines just to converse with their clients. It’s not that different today, Ryan asserts, when Facebook members can’t share their photos with Renren’s 150 million account holders. All of these walled gardens, he said, need a “trusted intermediary” layer to become fully interconnected.

      An apt analogy which I've used multiple times in the past.

    1. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

      So true!!!

    1. cyberinfrastructure is something more specific thanthe network itself, but it is something more general than a tool or a resource developed for a particular proj-ect, a range of projects, or, even more broadly, for a particular discipline.

      Mentioned in the video https://youtu.be/lelmXaSibrc?t=17m35s

    1. Mutual aid societies were built on the razed foundations of the old  guilds, and cooperatives and mass political parties then drew on the  experience of the mutual aid societies."

      This reminds me of the beginning of the Civil Rights movement that grew out of the civic glue that arose out of prior work relating to rape cases several years prior.

      I recall Zeynep Tufekci writing a bit about some of these tangential ideas in some of her social network writing. (Where's the link to that?)

  10. Aug 2020
  11. Jul 2020
  12. Jun 2020
  13. May 2020
  14. Apr 2020
    1. import all the necessary libraries into our notebook. LibROSA and SciPy are the Python libraries used for processing audio signals. import os import librosa #for audio processing import IPython.display as ipd import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from scipy.io import wavfile #for audio processing import warnings warnings.filterwarnings("ignore") view raw modules.py hosted with ❤ by GitHub View the code on <a href="https://gist.github.com/aravindpai/eb40aeca0266e95c128e49823dacaab9">Gist</a>. Data Exploration and Visualization Data Exploration and Visualization helps us to understand the data as well as pre-processing steps in a better way. 
    2. TensorFlow recently released the Speech Commands Datasets. It includes 65,000 one-second long utterances of 30 short words, by thousands of different people. We’ll build a speech recognition system that understands simple spoken commands. You can download the dataset from here.
    3. In the 1980s, the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) was applied to the speech recognition system. HMM is a statistical model which is used to model the problems that involve sequential information. It has a pretty good track record in many real-world applications including speech recognition.  In 2001, Google introduced the Voice Search application that allowed users to search for queries by speaking to the machine.  This was the first voice-enabled application which was very popular among the people. It made the conversation between the people and machines a lot easier.  By 2011, Apple launched Siri that offered a real-time, faster, and easier way to interact with the Apple devices by just using your voice. As of now, Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Home are the most popular voice command based virtual assistants that are being widely used by consumers across the globe. 
    4. Learn how to Build your own Speech-to-Text Model (using Python) Aravind Pai, July 15, 2019 Login to Bookmark this article (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Overview Learn how to build your very own speech-to-text model using Python in this article The ability to weave deep learning skills with NLP is a coveted one in the industry; add this to your skillset today We will use a real-world dataset and build this speech-to-text model so get ready to use your Python skills!
    1. Keras is a high-level neural networks API, written in Python and capable of running on top of TensorFlow, CNTK, or Theano. It was developed with a focus on enabling fast experimentation. Being able to go from idea to result with the least possible delay is key to doing good research. Use Keras if you need a deep learning library that: Allows for easy and fast prototyping (through user friendliness, modularity, and extensibility). Supports both convolutional networks and recurrent networks, as well as combinations of the two. Runs seamlessly on CPU and GPU. Read the documentation at Keras.io. Keras is compatible with: Python 2.7-3.6.
    1. Networks  of civic engagement increase the potential cost to defectors who risk  benefits from future transactiaction. The same networks foster norms of  reciprocity that are reinforced by the networks of relationships in  which reputation is both balued and discussed. The same social networks  facilitate the flow of reputational information.

      How can we build some of this into social media networks to increase the level of trust and facts?

    1. there’s nothing exceptional about human brains.

      But is there something exceptional about the societies we have built? And the culture (including everything: chairs, tables, houses, streets, etc, etc) that surrounds us? I mean: is consciousness something that we have as individuals? Or is is something collective that we feel individually? Like a node in a vast network that gets a feeling of the local consciousness that the whole network has, and feels as if it is his/her own consciousness...

  15. Feb 2020
    1. The wiki can be used as a semantic networking tool, a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages ) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. A semantic network of wikis can help learners to organize their ideas and to convey that organisation of ideas to others (Jonassen et al, 1999, p.165)

      semantic networking tool: a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. The pages are nodes the hyperlinks are the meaningful links. You can also see how important a concept is by the times it appears in other pages.s

  16. Jan 2020
  17. Dec 2019
    1. "Most of the structuring forms I'll show you stem from the simple capability of being able to establish arbitrary linkages between different substructures, and of directing the computer subsequently to display a set of linked substructures with any relative positioning we might designate among the different substructures. You can designate as many different kinds of links as you wish, so that you can specify different display or manipulative treatment for the different types."
    2. "You usually think of an argument as a serial sequence of steps of reason, beginning with known facts, assumptions, etc., and progressing toward a conclusion. Well, we do have to think through these steps serially, and we usually do list the steps serially when we write them out because that is pretty much the way our papers and books have to present them—they are pretty limiting in the symbol structuring they enable us to use. Have you even seen a 'scrambled-text' programmed instruction book? That is an interesting example of a deviation from straight serial presentation of steps.3b6b "Conceptually speaking, however, an argument is not a serial affair. It is sequential, I grant you, because some statements have to follow others, but this doesn't imply that its nature is necessarily serial. We usually string Statement B after Statement A, with Statements C, D, E, F, and so on following in that order—this is a serial structuring of our symbols. Perhaps each statement logically followed from all those which preceded it on the serial list, and if so, then the conceptual structuring would also be serial in nature, and it would be nicely matched for us by the symbol structuring.3b6c "But a more typical case might find A to be an independent statement, B dependent upon A, C and D independent, E depending upon D and B, E dependent upon C, and F dependent upon A, D, and E. See, sequential but not serial? A conceptual network but not a conceptual chain. The old paper and pencil methods of manipulating symbols just weren't very adaptable to making and using symbol structures to match the ways we make and use conceptual structures. With the new symbol-manipulating methods here, we have terrific flexibility for matching the two, and boy, it really pays off in the way you can tie into your work.3b6d This makes you recall dimly the generalizations you had heard previously about process structuring limiting symbol structuring, symbol structuring limiting concept structuring, and concept structuring limiting mental structuring.
  18. Nov 2019
    1. HGT typically adds new catabolic routes to microbial metabolic networks. This increases the chance of new metabolic interactions between bacteria
  19. Jul 2019
    1. Compared with neural networks configured by a pure grid search,we find that random search over the same domain is able to find models that are as good or betterwithin a small fraction of the computation time.
  20. Jun 2019
    1. Throughout the past two decades, he has been conducting research in the fields of psychology of learning and hybrid neural network (in particular, applying these models to research on human skill acquisition). Specifically, he has worked on the integrated effect of "top-down" and "bottom-up" learning in human skill acquisition,[1][2] in a variety of task domains, for example, navigation tasks,[3] reasoning tasks, and implicit learning tasks.[4] This inclusion of bottom-up learning processes has been revolutionary in cognitive psychology, because most previous models of learning had focused exclusively on top-down learning (whereas human learning clearly happens in both directions). This research has culminated with the development of an integrated cognitive architecture that can be used to provide a qualitative and quantitative explanation of empirical psychological learning data. The model, CLARION, is a hybrid neural network that can be used to simulate problem solving and social interactions as well. More importantly, CLARION was the first psychological model that proposed an explanation for the "bottom-up learning" mechanisms present in human skill acquisition: His numerous papers on the subject have brought attention to this neglected area in cognitive psychology.
    1. However, this doesn’t mean that Min-Max scaling is not useful at all! A popular application is image processing, where pixel intensities have to be normalized to fit within a certain range (i.e., 0 to 255 for the RGB color range). Also, typical neural network algorithm require data that on a 0-1 scale.

      Use min-max scaling for image processing & neural networks.

  21. Apr 2019
    1. Most of these near clones have and will fail. The reason that matching the basic proof of work hurdle of an Status as a Service incumbent fails is that it generally duplicates the status game that already exists. By definition, if the proof of work is the same, you're not really creating a new status ladder game, and so there isn't a real compelling reason to switch when the new network really has no one in it.

      This presumes that status is the only reason why people would join such a network. It also underlines the fact that the platform needs to be easy and simple to use, otherwise no one enters it and uses it as the tool first before the network exists.

  22. Mar 2019
  23. Feb 2019
    1. y, these occurrences –which 38arguablycan be considered the norm rather than the exception in related taxa –may 39provide useful evidence of relatednes

      This is very true.

      And one reason more why especially palaeontologists should stop ignoring distance-based networks (following the Farris'ian Dogma that "distance = phenetic", but see Felsenstein, 2004, Inferring Phylogenies) as a tool to explore the non-trivial signal in their data sets — some application examples posted at the Genealogical World of Phylogenetic Networks; see also Denk & Grimm, Rev. Pal. Pal. 2009, Bomfleur et al., BMC Evol. Biol. 2015, —, PeerJ, 2017. Even in the absence of reticulation, evolving morphologies do not provide tree-like signal, because synapomorphies, characters fully compatible with the true tree, are rare, homoiologies common, and convergences, characters incompatible with the true tree, inevitable.

      The less tree-like the signal and the more different the individual probabilities for change, the more misleading or ambiguous will be the parsimony tree reconstruction. Neighbour-nets may appear to be crude tools, but are quick-to-infer, designed to handle data incompatibility. Consensus networks are, in any possible aspect, more informative than a strict or majority rule consensus tree.

      Instead of trying to decide between equally and inevitable biased trees, we can just explore our data, using networks. See pic, depicting all potential synapomorphies, bold, symplesiomorphies, italics, and homoiologies that can be inferred directly from the crocodilian morphomatrix. Naturally including pseudo-synapomorphies (red) when compared to the provided molecular tree.

      PS That the way out of the dilemma is to embrace networks has been realised very early in evolutionary sciences (long before Hennig and Farris).

      Pic3

    1. “the true benefit of the academy is the interaction, the accessto the debate, to the negotiation of knowledge—not to the stale cataloging of content

      Once this particular light goes on in one's head, it may be impossible to turn it off. Yet we still need the so-called "stale" cataloging of content. We need foundational knowledge. Perhaps the academy has just made its function (again) more visible under connectivism? And we are in a creative tension of sorts with knowledge cataloging as an end in itself?

  24. Jan 2019
    1. Finally, a maincontribution of this research lies in the examination of the solicitation of expertise in a digitally-connected world, where widely distributed and diverse expertise must nevertheless be realized under highly localized conditions.

      Evokes crowdsourcing/peer production literature on expertise (Majchrzak et al, Faraj et al, Benkler et al, Kittur,et al.)

  25. Dec 2018
    1. It is based on reciprocity and a level of trust that each party is actively seeking value-added information for the other.

      Seems like this is a critical assumption to examine for current media literacy/misinformation discussions. As networks become very large and very flat, does this assumption of reciprocity and good faith hold? (I'm thinking, here, of people whose expertise I trust in one domain but perhaps not in another, or the fact that sometimes I'm talking to one part of my network and not really "actively seeking information" for other parts.)

    1. feed-forward network (also known as a multilayer perceptron)

      In the network, each layer has variety of cells, which connect to next layers cells.

  26. Nov 2018
    1. At Clark, we established networked communities to help professors from different disciplines share innovative pedagogies and ideas for leading student work on group projects.

      Specifically how is "networked communities" being used in this context? "Networked" how (technically, practically, and organizationally)?

  27. Oct 2018
    1. Do neural networks dream of semantics?

      Neural networks in visual analysis, linguistics Knowledge graph applications

      1. Data integration,
      2. Visualization
      3. Exploratory search
      4. Question answering

      Future goals: neuro-symbolic integration (symbolic reasoning and machine learning)

  28. Aug 2018
    1. To start you thinking, here’s a quote from lead educator Jean Burgess. Jean considers how Twitter has changed since 2006 and reflects on her own use of the platform in the context of changing patterns of use. In response to the suggestion that Twitter is a dying social media platform, Jean states that: the narratives of decline around the place at the moment […] have to do with a certain loss of sociability. And to those of us for whom Twitter’s pleasures were as much to do with ambient intimacy, personal connections and play as they were to do with professional success theatre, celebrity and breaking news, this is a real, felt loss: sociability matters.
    1. Historically,researchers in diverse fields such as communication, sociology, law, and eco-nomics have argued that effective human systems organize people through acombination of hierarchical structures (e.g., bureaucracies), completely dis-tributed coordination mechanisms (e.g., markets), and social institutions ofvarious kinds (e.g., cultural norms). However, the rise of networked systemsand online platforms for collective intelligence has upended many of the as-sumptions and findings from this earlier research.

      Benkler argues that the process, motives, and cultural norms of online network-driven knowledge work are different than systems previously studied and should be re-evaluated.

    1. the internet may not be the most effective means of bringing work to an audience, particularly if you don’t already have some sort of access to an audience that will allow your work to be discovered

      Traditional scholarly publishing has a huge benefit of momentum - everyone is already there.

  29. Jul 2018
    1. Then I used Gephi, another free data analysis tool, to visualize the data as an entity-relationship graph. The coloured circles—called Nodes—represent Twitter accounts, and the intersecting lines—known as Edges—refer to Follow/Follower connections between accounts. The accounts are grouped into colour-coded community clusters based on the Modularity algorithm, which detects tightly interconnected groups. The size of each node is based on the number of connections that account has with others in the network.
    2. Using the open-source NodeXL tool, I collected and imported a complete list of accounts tweeting that exact phrase into a spreadsheet. From that list, I also gathered and imported an extended community of Twitter users, comprised of the friends and followers of each account. It was going to be an interesting test: if the slurs against Nemtsov were just a minor case of rumour-spreading, they probably wouldn't be coming from more than a few dozen users.
    1. The New Yorker’s Sasha Frere-Jones called Twitter a “self-cleaning oven,” suggesting that false information could be flagged and self-corrected almost immediately. We no longer had to wait 24 hours for a newspaper to issue a correction.
    1. Dissemination MechanismsFinally, we need to think about how this content is being disseminated. Some of it is being shared unwittingly by people on social media, clicking retweet without checking. Some of it is being amplified by journalists who are now under more pressure than ever to try and make sense and accurately report information emerging on the social web in real time. Some of it is being pushed out by loosely connected groups who are deliberately attempting to influence public opinion, and some of it is being disseminated as part of sophisticated disinformation campaigns, through bot networks and troll factories.
    1. The team found that the number of friends that pairs of individual have in common is strongly correlated with the strength of the tie between them, as measured in other ways. That’s regardless of whether people are linked by mobile-phone records or by social ties in rural Indian villages.
  30. Nov 2017
    1. Rather than framing everything at the course level, we should be deploying these technologies for the individual.26

      Obvious question: what about groups, communities, networks, and other supra-individual entities apart from the course/cohort model?

    1. As they stand, and especially with algorithmic reinforcement, “reactions” and “likes” are like megaphones for echo chambers and news outrage.

      This is something that's been nagging at me for the last couple of weeks.

      Does it all matter? Does that tweet, share, thumbs up, like really matter at all? If you/we/I share out of tweet of support, outrage, or indifference, does it really matter on the grand scale.

      Yes, I might have some likeminded individuals value it, read it, use it, share it. But, ultimately aren't we really just shouting into the echo chambers that have been built up for us thanks to these algorithms and networks? We're preaching to the choir.

      I'd like to think that open can/will combat this...but unsure.

      I think this is a post for Hybrid Ped or elsewhere. Lemme know if this resonates with anyone and you want to write it out.

  31. Oct 2017
    1. Another significant finding is that efforts of the membersof religious networks—in spite of their relatively closedcharacteristics—in terms of being at the center of a net-work and taking the brokerage role are, contrary to theliterature, highly developed

      This is an important finding that can help researchers better understand how this and similar religious networks operate.

    1. health-minded individuals discuss health problems with their peers and seek support fromexperts

      Absolutely. There are hardly any topics that are not discussed on the Twitter. The networks are created when the like-minded twitter users retweet each other’s tweets, creating a unique social network.

    1. addictive behavior

      I think this week's readings by Yang et al were really helpful in understanding how addictive behavior can spread through the network. A study by Cohen and Lemay (2007) suggested that there is a link between having less diverse social networks and getting influenced into drinking and smoking. It will be really interesting to see the results of this study. Especially, how the network dynamics might change since this is a egocentric network.

  32. Sep 2017
    1. mphasize its normative, shared,inter-generationally transmitted characteristics rather than itsheterogeneity, emergence, and practical application.

      I wonder about weak vs strong ties. This strikes me as a difference, i.e. heterogeneity. I also wonder about knowledge network analysis...maybe this is about how knowledge travels.

    1. ccording to this blog,

      When I read this blog, I thought about how knowledge comes to mature academics. When we are junior, we spend a great deal of time reading the specifics of articles and texts. Do we do the same as senior academics? Or does knowledge come to us via our networks? We talk to people at conferences or exchange ideas via email or other digital means? Just wondering if knowledge networks change over the life course of an academic?

    1. how they influence our lives, and how individual behavior is shaped by these networks.

      Networks are what sociologists talk about all the time but our methods don't fully 'see' them. We find relationships between variables--i.e. race and class--and then discuss how this relationship is due to social forces. Networks are the way in which social forces exert power!

    1. t is possible to identify a wide variety of actors who have contributed to ashift towards, and/or reproduced, academic capitalism:

      Each of these could be a network. You could compare the networks to see if they are structured differently as a way of trying to understand who is most responsible for the push towards Academic Capitalism.

    1. networks are everywhere,

      I think this is why they are hard to analyze...it is like trying to see and understand air. It is everywhere so it feels so normal and invisible. Networks, particularly human networks are the same. Humans have always been embedded in networks; we live, thrive and die in networks. They are another form of 'air'. The difference is that today, social media has made them more visible. We can now see them and analyze them in new ways. Hence, why this class is online :-)

    1. new framework for understanding issues ranging from democracy on the web to the vulnerability of the internet and the spread of deadly viruses

      Sometimes this new framework feels a bit overwhelming to me because it asks me to 'see' the world differently. I am use to seeing through discreet categories containing individuals; i.e. race, class and gender. SNA is asking me to see it through interconnections and links--the stuff behind the categories. Sometimes it feels like I am being asked to see 'air'; I know it is there, but it is all around me--ubiquitous--which makes it harder, and more intellectually challenging, to see.

  33. Aug 2017
    1. This is a very easy paper to follow, but it looks like their methodology is a simple way to improve performance on limited data. I'm curious how well this is reproduced elsewhere.

  34. May 2017
    1. Rather than selecting a single organization to lead the network, consider a spoke-and-hub or constellation model that empowers teams of organizations to act as “network hubs” for different sectors of the network. The best candidates for these hubs are intermediary organizations that act in the best interests of the network, allowing other network members to focus on their core mission and programmatic activities. Hub organizations play several roles. As conveners, they bring people together and build the field. As catalysts, they invest money and resources to get new ideas off the ground or help exciting projects to develop. As communicators, hub organizations enhance networks members’ ability to tell their story effectively and efficiently, internally and externally. As champions, hubs lift up the accomplishments of network actors, regionally, nationally, and internationally. And, as coordinators, hub organizations connect the dots, recommend priorities for the network, and connect those priorities to national resources.

      This could describe BCcampus - a hub organization that connects networks

  35. Apr 2017
    1. connects

      The description of iLife seems to echo the point made by Charles Taylor (as qtd. by Rickert): "Webs and networks can no more exist without me than can I without them."

    1. networkculture.Everythingusesandisused,andthereisnoclearboundarybetweentheoneandtheother.

      Re: my microresponse from 3/11 regarding Perelman, Burke, networks, community, and social fabric

    1. If we write that out as equations, we get:

      It would be easier to understand what are x and y and W here if the actual numbers were used, like 784, 10, 55000, etc. In this simple example there are 3 x and 3 y, which is misleading. In reality there are 784 x elements (for each pixel) and 55,000 such x arrays and only 10 y elements (for each digit) and then 55,000 of them.

  36. Mar 2017
    1. I have a lot of questions about whether any of the web-based tools we are using actually fit the mold of System A. I don’t often feel those spaces as convivial and natural. Behind the artifice of interface lay the reality of code. Is that structure humane? Is it open, sustainable, and regenerative? Does it feel good? Does the whole idea behind code generate System A or System B? I really don’t know.

      This is a really good key question..

    1. Then it was Maha's Birthday, why don't we sing 'Happy Birthday' I thought, - well why not?

      Distant Presence Friends

    2. during the week we had students reading my blog, seeing their snow hat from last winter being commented on by people all around the world and retweeted by Rihanna (a robot - I kept that quiet not to spoil the effect) on Twitter.

      Modeling reflective practice.

      Narrative connected

    3. First day in class, we had students chatting with a friend of mine working on a Ski Resort in Australia,

      Porous walls. Hybridization. Change narrative

    1. I met with my friend Marcin Kleban. After a twenty minute discussion we started a project of 40 language teachers and learners, he trusted me.. I met with my friend Blaise Ngandeu, I was able to learn about Nexus Analysis from my friend Maritta Riekki.

      connections attachment identification

    2. I wrote about this experience here in Swings and Roundabouts.

      Learning the power of open.

    1. So with social networking graphs, we will be able to get a better view on connections and their movement in the #rhizo14 constellation.

      Different methodology for research.

  37. Jan 2017
  38. Nov 2016
    1. Softmax分类器所做的就是最小化在估计分类概率(就是 Li=efyi/∑jefjLi=efyi/∑jefjL_i =e^{f_{y_i}}/\sum_je^{f_j})和“真实”分布之间的交叉熵.

      而这样的好处,就是如果样本误分的话,就会有一个非常大的梯度。而如果使用逻辑回归误分的越严重,算法收敛越慢。比如,\(t_i=1\) 而 \(y_i=0.0000001\),cost function 为 \(E=\frac{1}{2}(t-y)^2\) 那么,\(\frac{dE}{dw_i}=-(t-y)y(1-y)x_i\).

  39. Sep 2016
    1. A network perspective not only lays bare the various stakeholders with a vested social, economic, and political interest in what happens within schools and colleges, but also the ways agency for what happens within classrooms at my institution extends beyond the students and educators charged with constructing learning.

      Useful approach (reminiscent of ANT), especially if paired with a community-based approach.

  40. Jul 2016
    1. Page 158

      George Barnett, Edward think, and Mary Beth debus constructed a mathematical model of citation age to test this ordering using large data sets from each of the science citation index, social sciences citation index, and arts and humanities citation index published by the isi. In each of these three sets, the citation age of an average article reaches its peak in less than two years, with the Arts and Humanities peeking soonest parentheses 1.164 years close parentheses comma and the social sciences speaking latest parentheses 1.752 years close parentheses, contrary to expectations. The maximum proportion of citations did have the predicted ordering, with science the highest, and the Arts and Humanities the lowest. While the models presume that citation rates were stable over time a close examination of the data revealed that citation for article increase substantially over the time period of the study parentheses in science, from 12.14 per article in 1961 to 16 in 1986 God semi colon in the social sciences, from 7.07 in 1970 to 15.6 in 1986 semi colon no Citation for article data were given for the Arts and Humanities close parentheses.

    2. Page 158

      Half-Life studies are used to identify temporal variations in the use of literature by discipline most such studies indicate that the humanities have the longest citation half life and the Sciences the shortest with the social sciences in between. In other words, scientific articles reference the most recent Publications and Humanities articles the least recent ones.

    3. Pages 36 and 37

      Boardman discusses Merton. Lots of references here to series of citation and networks of relationships among Scholars the other references they make to each other's work

  41. May 2016
    1. When students see adults actually listening to them with respect, that is when they begin to realize they have a voice and can make a difference in their world.

      I hope this is true. And I love the idea that adults are that important to students. Still I wonder how this fits with the connected-learning notion that youth want to be heard and recognized by their peers. I suppose it isn't an either/or: some youth seek peer approval, others want to be heard by adults. When you post on an open social network, you never know who will respond.

  42. Apr 2016
    1. If, at the dawn of the web, I was to take a list of things the web would bring about and show them to a researcher, they might disagree on the level of interest people would have in things (what’s with the cat pictures, spaceman?) but there’d be little there to surprise them except for one item: the most used reference work in the world will be collaboratively maintained by a group of anonymous and pseudonymous volunteers as part of a self-organizing network.

      It would be nice if on this day, as we marvel about the rise of Wikipedia, we could turn some of our attention to the Wikipedias of the future. Where are opportunities for this mode of collaboration that we’ve missed? Why are we not confronted by more impossible things? How can we move from the electronic dreams of the 1970s to visions informed by the lessons of wiki and Wikipedia? Some people might think we’ve already done that. But I’m pretty sure we’re barely getting started.

  43. Jan 2016