1,187 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. disruptive of formal education and enabling of student-centered and interest-driven learning

      To what extent are these actually at odds?

    1. oundaries between different learning and discourse spaces (e.g., public vs. private, formal educationvs. workplace learning) are to be crossed if not totally dissolved

      This is probably a long-term goal of mine that I might as well own up to.

  2. May 2019
    1. Professors base these grades on a combination of factors and values, such as 10% participation, 20% homework, 30% final exam, and 40% group project. Digital adaptive learning tools can do this too, and then take the student’s score and match it with the next best skill in the subject’s overall scope and sequence.

      This is interesting. This could be interesting in design.

    2. Adaptive learning does not fit easily into the status quo. Besides having to use a blended learning model, in which class-time is divvied up between traditional and electronic learning, teachers must be willing to let students progress at their own pace.

      Could this fit within a trades model?

    3. This is different to simply providing differentiated content for students. For instance, if a learner was not in class during a period when a particular skill was introduced, and years later was learning a new skill that built on that prior knowledge, that learner would struggle. Adaptive sequencing tools could help that student go back to find this gap and learn this content first, rather than following the same sequence as everyone else

      This could be very powerful in trades training.

    4. Practice Engine

      This is brilliant. Start simple and then ramp it up for practice.

    5. A fixed-form assessment is one in which the items are preselected, and every student is tested on the same set of questions (e.g. a final exam).

      fixed form assessment vs. adaptive assessment.

    6. Let’s break these down a little further

      Content, Assement, sequence. The three places adaptive learning occurs.

    7. How do we use testing – or assessment – not simply to rank students but as meaningful windows into why they struggle to learn? And the big one: Can changes in digital curriculum help close the aching achievement gap?

      OMG YES!!!

    8. we define digital adaptive learning tools as education technologies that can respond to a student’s interactions in real-time by automatically providing the student with individual support

      Definition of adaptaive learning

    9. Knewton alone has raised nearly $160 million.

      interesting

    10. The tools, however, are not a panacea. For several reasons, it’s unlikely that a single tool will ever be able to take over a student’s education and direct them to every single thing they should do. Nor is it likely that we would want it to, as a critical part of education is building student agency – helping students own their learning, make decisions, become lifelong learners, and develop their metacognitive skills.

      YES!

    11. But a critical challenge correctly noted in this report, written by EdSurge and supported by Pearson, is to decipher just what it means for a learning technology to be adaptive.
    12. Adaptive learning is an enormously promising field. Educators worldwide are using adaptive tools to change their practice. The tools are growing and gaining acceptance in classrooms.
    1. A PLE can be entirely controlled or adapted by a student according to his or her formal and informal learning needs, however not all students possess the knowledge management and the self-regulatory skills to effectively use social media in order to customize a PLE to provide the learning experience they desire.

      Teaching students to become self-regulated learners

    1. policy change index - machine learning on corpus of text to identify and predict policy changes in China

  3. Apr 2019
    1. Annotation Profile Follow learners as they bookmark content, highlight selected text, and tag digital resources. Analyze annotations to better assess learner engagement, comprehension and satisfaction with the materials assigned.

      There is already a Caliper profile for "annotation." Do we have any suggestions about the model?

    1. game for students, Calculation Nation from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics is a wonderful resource.

      math game for summer

    2. Beat Summer Slide: The Parent Summer Checklist

      read this

    1. ive into equations: When plunging into a pool, have your child calculate the volume and weight of the water and the rate at which the pool will fill or drain. Be a meteorologist: Track summer weather and convert daily temperatures from Celsius to Fahrenheit and monitor monthly rainfall. Show the relevance: Invite your child to help you prepare poolside treats. Encourage them to use measuring cups and proportion snacks into different size bowls. Connect Math & Language: If your child excells at language, then use that subject as a platform to help them excel in math. Give them picture books and nonfiction texts to read that focus on math. Turn errands into learning opportunities: While at the grocery store, have your child figure out which box of crackers is closest to the $2.50 price point and count the kiwis as they put them in the bag. Add some education to your road trips: Distract your child from asking “Are we there yet?!” by creating paper tickets that identify all the rest stops along the way, so they can practice time and distance on the ride there. Make your beach day mathematical: Have your child arrange their seashells into piles of 3 or 5, and use those piles as the basis for multiplication and subtraction activities. Note Numbers:Have your child pay close attention to numbers found on clocks, cereal boxes, the kitchen calendar and the local newspaper. Have tell you how many articles are on page B4 of the paper and calculate how long they’ve been awake for. Pay close attention to menus: Whether you go out for dinner or order in, there’s bound to be a menu involved. Have your child pinpoint the price specific item, or list items that range between $10 and $15, or calculate how much a hamburger and a juice would cost. Change it up: Give your child a pile of coins–the bigger the assortment, the better! Have them find as many coin combinations as possible that equal the price of a beach ball.

      math ideas

    1. Even organized sports teach children about mathematics, rules, teamwork, planning, and so on. Likewise, a family game like Scrabble is about linguistics, psychology, mathematics, memory, competition, and doggedness. It’s about mastering the rules.

      even sports and family games help...

    1. Updated! 10 Online Summer Learning Opportunities]

      list of ten fun activities...lots of tech stuff

    1. S.M.A.R.T. Cases are boxed kits that include science activities and supplementary materials that make it a complete learning package for young people. S.M.A.R.T. Cases are sponsored by the Torrance Refining Company.  WHY IS THIS CASE SO “S.M.A.R.T.”? S.M.A.R.T. Cases are science kits designed for hands-on learning. They come with the tools and resources to make learning fun and easy. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) requires that students engage in practice-rich activities that support their use of the case contents to figure out and explain complex phenomena and make connections to principles that cut across the content areas (NRC, 2012; NGSS Lead States, 2013). With the assistance of faculty at Torrance Unified School District, each case was evaluated for grade level and compliance with the framework for the NGSS.

      check one out for presentation

    1. Topic: Reading Classroom Ideas 10 Kids Summer Reading Programs We Love Summer reading is better reading. <img alt='' src='https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/2f903edaa3cdf06132a636fea64aea4e?s=44&#038;d=mm&#038;r=g' srcset='https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/2f903edaa3cdf06132a636fea64aea4e?s=88&#038;d=mm&#038;r=g 2x' class='avatar avatar-44 photo' height='44' width='44' /> Shellie Deringer on June 13, 2017 .contest-social .share-links svg, .share-links svg { top: 50%; left: 0px; } #atftbx p:first-of-type { display: none; } .entry-content .addthis_toolbox, .entry-content .addthis_button, .entry-header .addthis_toolbox, .entry-header .addthis_button { margin: 0 !important;} .at-style-responsive .at-share-btn { padding: 0 !important;} AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PinterestPinterest <img width="800" height="450" src="https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900.jpg" class="attachment-full size-full wp-post-image" alt="kids summer reading programs" srcset="https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900.jpg 800w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-272x153.jpg 272w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-400x225.jpg 400w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-768x432.jpg 768w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-217x122.jpg 217w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-490x275.jpg 490w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-556x312.jpg 556w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-660x370.jpg 660w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/GettyImages-504870144-e1497380601900-300x169.jpg 300w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /> ;new advadsCfpAd( 361210 );Next to the benefits of playing and swimming all summer long, reading is just about the most important thing kids can do this summer. We put together this list of free kids summer reading programs to help keep the learning going over the next few months. Share these kids summer reading programs with your students and their families! 1. Barnes & Noble Summer Reading for Kids <img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-365078" src="https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/barnes-and-noble-400x112.png" alt="" width="400" height="112" srcset="https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/barnes-and-noble.png 400w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/barnes-and-noble-220x62.png 220w, https://s18670.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/barnes-and-noble-300x84.png 300w" sizes="(max-width: 400px) 100vw, 400px" /> This program begins in May and runs through September. Kids can earn a FREE book after they read eights books and log them on the reading sheet. The Barnes and Noble kids summer reading program is only available to children in grades 1-6. Only one book is available for each child who completes a reading journal and choice must be made from the selected books available at the store.

      Reading programs

    1. READS for Summer Learning.[14] In READS, which has been iteratively modified over several randomized trials, students receive eight books in the mail over the summer that are matched to their reading level and interests. Along with each book, students receive a tri-fold paper that leads them through a pre-reading activity and a post-reading comprehension check. Students are asked to mail the postage-prepaid tri-fold back; families receive reminders when tri-folds are not returned.

      great idea to add to presentation

    2. An early comprehensive review of the literature summarized several findings regarding summer loss.[2] The authors concluded that: (1) on average, students’ achievement scores declined over summer vacation by one month’s worth of school-year learning, (2) declines were sharper for math than for reading, and (3) the extent of loss was larger at higher grade levels.

      research to use

    1. focus on collaboration, connection, diversity, democracy, and critical assessments of educational tools and structures

      Also critical assessments of authority structures, truth claims, value judgments...

    1. PBL) isan instructional method in which students lear

      Problem based learning is an instructional method in which students learn through facilitated problem solving. Problem based curricula provide students with guided experience in learning through solving complex, real-world problems. Rating: 9/10

    1. We asked whether the PVT may be a critical target for ZI regulation of food intake.

      The authors showed that ZI GABA neurons send input to the PVT. They then assessed through further experimentation whether these PVT neurons are involved in food intake. Thus, they have used scientific questioning and evidence to build on their model of how the ZI controls feeding behavior.

    2. previous observations that some ZI cells project to the PVT (13, 14),

      This shows that science builds on the replication of studies to increase confidence in findings. Further, science advances by current studies building on those from the past.

    1. Emotional learning involves meddling with deeply personal, private aspectsof workers’ lives in an effort to influence and shape their emotions, some-times with constructive and sometimes with destructive results. Two aspectsof emotion have particular relevance in the workplace: emotional intelli-gence and emotion labor.
  4. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Articulate what they know; 2. reflect on what they have learned; 3. support the internal negotiation of meaning making; 4. construct personal representations of meaning; and 5. support intentional, mindful thinking

      what technology should do in an online course to reach adults

    2. Since online learning has a different setting from the conventional classroom,online educators need to use some special techniques and perceptions to leadto success. Moreover, adults have special needs and requirements as learnerscompared with children and adolescents, thus online educators should knowhow adults can learn best because of their special characteristics. Philosophicaland methodological shifts also affect instruction. Many researchers havesuggested that constructivism should be applied in distance education. Thus,this paper attempts to examine the impact of constructivism in online learningenvironments when focusing on adult learners. The author develops the con-nection between constructivism and adult learning theory. In addition, thepaper proposes instructional guidelines using the constructivist approach inonline learning for adults.
  5. s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Workplace-relatedlearningis learning that is related to the firm in which the learner is employed and that is supported at least to some extent by their employer, but that is notfoundationalor higher education. Individuals may engage in this type of learning for the purposeof learning a new job, improving their job performance, for professional development, as an employee benefit or because it is required by legislation.
    2. Key dimensions of adult learning activities

      form, provider, payer, purpose, duration, design, delivery, instructor quality, credential

    3. Fivebroad types of adult learning

      Adult learning types including Foundational, higher education, workplace, personal, social. Includes a list of examples of the types of learning this includes in each category.

    1. The  Use  of  Mobile  Devices  for  Academic  Purposes  at  the  University  of  Washington:  Current  State  and  Future  Prospects

      Professional development opportunities and incentives for faculty to integrate mobile devices and as a teaching and learning tool.

    1. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

      Studies faculty provided with tablet computers and peer mentoring workshops to help increase understanding and use of mobile devices in pedogogical approaches

    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
    1. Author Tom Vander Ark, also author of Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World, brings a reflection of what ends up being 10 trends and 10 suggestions on how to develop impact in relation to the trends. The article is straight forward in the trends, but also does offer platform and educational examples to enhance the content.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article discusses adult learners who connected with industry professionals in a career exploration course that focused around technology and coding. The program is hoping to show other places that focus on adult learning a model that would work for adult learners to gain access to industry.

      Rating: 6/10. Interesting article, but not really a focus on how they effectively engaged the adult learns in the program or their approach to actually developing the course and curriculum.

    1. This article is a study of both in-person and online courses and the affect of internet usage on the student's engaged int those courses. The article notes how saturated the learning environment has become and their approach to using student self-reported data to measure engagement. The authors provide an extensive review of prior literature on both technology and student engagement topics. The data should be reviewed with caution, as it is outlined by the authors that the questions have not been thoroughly vetted for validity and reliability.

      Rating: 6/10. The article had positive results, but the data questions being untested is a bit concerning. The article is also from 2009, and the landscape has changed much since then.

  6. Mar 2019
    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. This article discusses that technology rich classroom research is lacking in the research world. This paper created a scale in which it could evaluate classroom environments. The authors tested this scale and determined it was a good starting framework for how to improve classroom environments. This scale could be useful later in class when evaluating technologies.Rating 9/10 for help assessment techniques

    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

  7. eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. The purpose of this book is to help learners plan ,develop and deliver online training programs for adults in the workplace. This book can be understood as a guide for training managers, instructional designers, course developers and educators who are looking to transition from classroom material to self-paced instructional programs.The main purpose of this book is for people who deliver training programs to be able to design programs for online. Most importantly, the learners needs are addressed in development. Rating 7/10 material is interesting and relevant but slightly outdated.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Q&A: How to Develop ‘Program Architecture’

      Discusses they ways in which Kacey Thorne of WGU, outlines plans for developing underlying competencies for online programs. Program architecture refers to the connect of skills and competencies for specific industries linking back to a network of what students will learn in school through offered programs. This is necessary for creating relevant programs that teach translatable skills for the real world after college. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      This article discusses the effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition and achievement in e-learning environments. This is a study of 67 higher education students. Half of the group participated in learning through e-learning with scaffolding while the other group did not have the scaffolding. Not surprisingly, the results show that scaffolding is essential to learning and these individuals preformed better than the group without scaffolding.

      Rating 8/10

    2. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. What Makes for Effective Adult Learning

      This article provides a short overview or strategies and techniques to make adult learning effective. This article quotes adult learning researches like Knowles to provide information about meaningful learning experiences. This article provides idea for activities that fit in the category of affective adult learning.

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. 4Vision: Preparing Learning Communities to succeed in College and Careers in a global society through technology.Vision and Goals

      This proposal outlines a draft for a technology plan for Arizona regarding adult education. This plan outlines the goals of the plan and how Arizona can address them moving forward. This plan outlines trends for the future in technology and acknowledges challenges that might come up later down the line. This plan also reviews teaching standards and instruction, as well as operations for the future. Rating 6/10 for being a draft, but with good ideas!

    1. Online is clearly where the growth is, especially when it comes to enrolling adults.

      This article is based around the idea that online education increases access for learners but lacks in completion data. This article provides data around the United States from a study conducted over a few years. Generally speaking this article encourages blended learning rather than all online to obtain better outcomes for adult learners. Rating 7/10 for use of graphs and evidence from data.

    1. Adult students have a higher incidence of disability and are less likely to seek accommodations than the general student population, so it is critical that institutions of higher education anticipate their needs, especially in online classes.

      This article provides statistics about the number of adult learners who learn online with a disability and how these numbers need to be addressed. The author observes that adult learning are least likely to ask for help and it's the designers job to assess their work to make it more accessible. This article provides recommendations on how to become more familiar with technology and what guidelines people should be following. Rating: 10/10 for addressing accessibility among adult learners and providing recommendations.

    1. This article reviews three learning styles and gives examples of how they fit into the three learning domains. Additionally this article reviews assumptions about adult learning and what it might actually mean. Lastly, this article reviews the instructional system design model and breaks down it's components. Rating 7/10 for lack of discussion but helpful tables

    1. At The Economist, we take data visualisation seriously. Every week we publish around 40 charts across print, the website and our apps. With every single one, we try our best to visualise the numbers accurately and in a way that best supports the story. But sometimes we get it wrong. We can do better in future if we learn from our mistakes — and other people may be able to learn from them, too.

      This is, factually and literally speaking, laudable in the extreme.

      Anybody can make mistakes; the best one can do is to admit that one does, and publicly learn from them - if one is a magazine. This is beauteously done.

    1. This fact sheet provides an overview of adult learning theories in a digestible format with citations throughout the sheet. The citations are from various experts on adult learning theory and examples are provided as well. Rating: 8/10 Clear and concise overview of adult learning theories.

    1. This article focuses on the adult learning environment from the teachers perspective. This article explains that there are many types of environments an adult learner experiences and why each of them are important. After reviewing the environments, the author provides recommendations from a professional perspective. Rating: 8/10 for providing an in-depth overview of different learning environments and how they apply to adult learners.

    1. This page is free resource to download a book about how people learn. This selected chapter provides recommendations for assessments and feedback in learning environments in general which also applies to adult learning. In addition to these examples, this chapter provides a section on theory and framework to better understand the overall topics. Rating: 10/10 Great free, open source resource with reputable information about learning.

    1. Active learning approaches

      This website is a blog hosted on an official EU platform that discusses what quality learning environments look like for adults. This webpage reviews traditional learning approaches versus active learning approaches how they contribute to a quality learning environment. Rating: 6/10 for including an easy to read comparison table but lacking in discussion.

    1. The “silver surfer” discourse reinforces the notion that older adults stand to benefit from ICTs in various ways, and that the ability to make use of new technology is a ready means through which to “bridge the generation gap”

      This article refers to an older generation of adults and how the intend to adopt technologies or why they choose not too. The author discusses how researchers know very little about the outcomes of older adults using technology and how it impacts their lives. Additionally, this article provides recommendations for how to accommodate older generations through the use of information and communications technologies. Rating: 8/10 for focus on a different class of adults

    1. The purpose of this paper is to propose an in-structional-design theory that supports a sense of community.

      This article addresses the fact that new instructional design theories and methods are needed to keep up with new technologies and ways of learning. This article reviews instructional design tools for creating a sense of community online for learners. Additionally, this article discusses the differences between design theory and descriptive theory as it pertains to instructional design. 6/10 This article is very specific and might only be relevant for a specific study or topic

    1. The project reported here aimed to highlight the advantages and weaknesses of web‐based learning for adults with learning disability, and to suggest improvements.

      This article reviews challenges faced by adult learners with learning disabilities as it related to online learning. This article discusses how adults with learning disabilities might not adopt new technologies in a productive way and highlights positive and negative aspects of this scenario. Additionally the author provides solutions to identify advantages and disadvantages of online learning for adults. Rating: 9/10 for addressing accessibility and disability concerns among adult learners.

    1. Mention McDonald’s to someone today, and they're more likely to think about Big Mac than Big Data. But that could soon change: The fast-food giant has embraced machine learning, in a fittingly super-sized way.McDonald’s is set to announce that it has reached an agreement to acquire Dynamic Yield, a startup based in Tel Aviv that provides retailers with algorithmically driven "decision logic" technology. When you add an item to an online shopping cart, it’s the tech that nudges you about what other customers bought as well. Dynamic Yield reportedly had been recently valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars; people familiar with the details of the McDonald’s offer put it at over $300 million. That would make it the company's largest purchase since it acquired Boston Market in 1999.

      McDonald's are getting into machine learning. Beware.

    1. Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

      In this peer-reviewed study, two tenth-grade classes were analyzed as they used either a virtual or a real laboratory to accomplish learning tasks. The question raised was whether a real or a virtual laboratory was more conducive to constructivist learning. The study concluded that a real lab is better than a virtual one to trigger constructivist learning. This is of importance to me because I teach adults about software in both virtual and real laboratories, and when I develop content, I try to use the constructivist theory as much as possible as I find it works best for my audience, in addition to making novel content more relatable. Please note: I could not put the annotation on the text because the paper opened in a popup page that does not work with Hypothes.is. 7/10

    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Engaging  Adult  Learners

      This article discusses some attributes that are unique to adult learners, such as that their learning is selective, self-directed, and often focused on solving problems. Therefore, it is important that instructors enable students to be autonomous and show them why it is important. Often in my instructional design, I start with the WIIFM (What's In It For Me?). This article supports my idea that my adult learners will choose to learn when it can solve a problem for them. This article also discusses active learning from an adult perspective, such as Socratic teaching. 9/10

    1. What the Research Says About Teaching Adults

      Colorado Community Colleges published this article to discuss research about teaching adults, focusing strongly on Knowles's six principles of andragogy. The main idea behind Knowles's principles is that adults learn because they decided to--because the information is relevant to them and they can benefit from attaining that knowledge. Therefore, the article states, activities that ask adult learners to discuss problems with each other will help them learn. This can be useful as I design instruction. 7/10

    1. Behaviorism

      Learning-Theories.com published a very handy few pages that describe various learning theories. This is a quick, straightforward, simple way to access information on the different theories. This article, Behaviorism, explains that the theory assumes learners learn by responding to external stimuli in their environment. Learning under behaviorism is characterized by a change in the learner's behavior. I use this in my horse training as I use both positive reinforcement (clicker training) and negative reinforcement (pressure-release) to structure my horse's behaviors. Behaviorism can be translated to human work, too. I've used TAG teaching (clicker training for humans) to teach people to get on and off horses with ease and also to trim horses' hooves. I also use it to clicker train my cats! 6/10

    1. Cognitivism

      Cognitivism challenge behaviorism by positing that humans are more complex than simple lumps that respond to external stimuli. Cognitivism claims that people must involve themselves in their learning and take an active role. In short, when information enters the mind, it must be processed before it becomes a change in behavior. 6/10

    1. Constructivism

      Constructivism is my favorite learning theory. It states that in order to learn, learners must experience something, then reconcile that experience with their previous experiences. The learner will create and test hypotheses based on all experiences, and prove those hypotheses right or wrong based on future experiences. They will then use what they learned from those hypotheses to create new ones. I frequently use this in my instructional design. 6/10

    1. Design-Based Research Methods (DBR)

      Design-based research (DBR) tries to connect learning theory and practice. It puts theories to the test and is an important part of siting through which parts of theories work well, contradict each other, or contradict themselves. This page provides several of the characteristics of design-based studies, as well as the needs and issues important to studying learning. 7/10

    1. Adult Learning Theory

      This article by the University of Utah discusses Lindeman's and Knowles's theories on adult learning. Andragogy uses the teacher differently from pedagogy: the teacher in an adult learning environment becomes a facilitator instead of the knower. I think this is an important distinction to make for people who go from teaching children to teaching adults. There are two of these people on my team at work. One taught third grade and one taught sixth grade, and both of them tend to try to put the instructor in the knower's position instead of the facilitator's position. They have to catch themselves often and rework some instruction to be more student-focused instead of content-focused. 8/10

    1. Overview of Learning Theories

      The Berkeley Graduate Division published an interesting and straightforward table of learning theories. The table compares behaviorism, cognitive constructivism, and social constructivism in four ways: the view of knowledge, view of learning, view of motivation, and implications for teaching. This is an easy-to-read, quick resource for those who would like a side-by-side comparison of common theories. 9/10

    1. Instructor-Led Training

      SharedBook.com published this article about the state of Instructor-Led Training (ILT) in 2018. It claims that technology has not caused instructor-led training demand to decrease, but instead as simply altered it to provide instructors with new tools. It is important to note how technology changes the delivery of ILT, because now trainers are able to reach more people in a variety of places, and have far more at their fingertips to help facilitate training than they did before technology became so pervasive. Technology also helps with assessing learner outcomes, as it provides more analytical tools. Hybrid ILT is also becoming more common as a super-training platform that combines strengths of E-learning with ILT. It is important, however, to ensure technology is used purposefully in technology-heavy ILT environments. 9/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. As one understands professional development in educational technology as potential transformational learning experiences, one can begin to reconceptualize its outcomes.

      This article provides an in-depth view from the teachers perspective about how to prepare for technology in their learning environments. Through professional development training, teachers and instructors can gain new knowledge about how to incorporate new technologies into their practice. This article focuses on one study and concludes that new technology needs to be introduced slowly for best practices.

    1. one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      This article takes on Adult Learning from an Instructional Design perspective. This article reviews 3 adult learning theories and why it's important for Instructional Designers to keep these theories in mind the facilitate the learning process. Rating: 9/10 for easy reading, overview of learning theories and emphasis on instructional design

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Towards a Mobile Augmented Reality Prototype for Corporate Training: A New Perspective

      Research Article. I found this article especially interesting because it promotes the use of mobile devices for online learning. This focuses on corporate training, but it is easy to see how it could be applied across areas and fields. There is a specific focus on the use of virtual and real objects during education experiences to create experience-based learning outcomes. Rating 4/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. This webpage discusses different learning styles for adults, the principles of adult learning theory and different instructional design models for the the present and future. This webpage reviews andragogy and adult learning theory from the works of Malcolm Knowles. This article comes from Rutgers University and provides additional resources for adult learners. Ratings: 7/10 for helpful, short overview

    1. This website is a free website that allows for users to access summaries of learning theories, educational guides and much more!

    2. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. A context aware personalize M-learning application based on m-learning preferences This is a scholarly paper presented in the context of engineering and is not readily accessible by the layperson; it is also dated. Nonetheless it includes some scenarios and recommendations for consideration of learner preferences. It is included in this list solely because it introduces the concept of context aware personalized mobile learning. rating 1/5

    1. Top ten benefits of personalization of e-learning The text that addresses this question is toward the bottom of the page. These include increased ROI (a rationale for this is not presented).It is an enumerated list with sufficient readability and usability although the viewer does have to scroll past less relevant information to get to the list. rating 3/5

    1. 2018 mobile learning This is a Pinterest style presentation of various posts related to mobile learning and its advantages. It relates primarily to adult learning and also includes information about trends and apps. It is neatly presented. rating 5/5

    1. The benefits of personalized learning through technology This resource is included in part because it connects personalized learning and technology. A brief list of benefits, such as increasing student engagement and bridging the gap between teachers and students, are listed. This is presented by a marketing unit of a university so there may be an agenda. Nonetheless it provides useful considerations such as helping learners develop 'design thinking.' rating 3/5

    1. learning in the 21st century mobile devices + social media = personalized learning This appears to be oriented toward K-12 students but several components seem applicable to professional learning. The context is schools. Key findings are listed at the beginning of the report. The report is somewhat dated but still makes some points worth considering, such as the potential for devices to serve as a distraction just as much as a tool. rating 2/5

    1. What's possible with personalized learning: an overview of personalized learning for schools, families, and communities. This 32 page PDF is included in part due to its credibility and also to its breadth. The focus is personalized learning in schools. All ages are considered and there is a discussion of 'what personalized learning means for teachers.' It is sufficiently readable and rather attractively presented for a report. rating 5/5