1,649 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. *Game star mechanic

      • Creativity is expressed via making video games online
      • problem solving skills increase
      • comments-feedback
      • constructive criticism needed
      • teachers need to be constructive in terms of feedback How does this change as school has become more online?
    1. Student interests i.e HP Alliance, influence how to participate and change society.

      • students change moby dick
      • guess Sound of Thunder ending (9th grade)
      • friendship driven participation-hanging with friends online
      • messing around-creative, geeky, interest driven, develop sophisticated forms of media literacy
      • think critically about privacy and identity
      • generational gap in online use and activities How will this be addressed in our technologically influenced world? How can teachers reach out to the friendship and messing around groups of students? What does it mean to participate in society?
    1. In creating online content, creativity is often influenced from other sources. Then the question is not only what is creativity but also what is originality? What does this say about copyright infringement in terms of digital property? What does this say about patent law?

    1. I like how the technology and collaborative aspects are being used to relate the issue of homelessness not only to the past events but also the issues facing their community on both a local and personal level.

    1. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product

      Nothing is ever finished on the internet

    2. our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future.

      the internet is constantly changing everyday as more information is uploaded daily. Nothing is ever finished being constructed

    3. The ideas and concepts in all of this work does overlap sometimes…and students and teachers should feel empowered to move in, out, and between all of the concepts. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      This is very true as flexibility is needed in the classroom.

    4. . In order to fill the void I would see concerning the creativity, composition, and design skills students need…we have been developing online content construction (OCC)

      This is especially important as technology integration in the classroom has become critical under our current situation.

  2. Jul 2020
    1. the market size: the global note-taking management software market is estimated to reach $1.35 billion by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 5.32% from 2019 to 2026greater scope for innovation: eg., be it creating a task list, a roadmap, or a design repository, Notion can handle it alllack of satisfaction: it’s noted that people always use a combination of note-taking apps and hardly stick to one for a long time

      Three reasons why we constantly see more note-taking apps, which in return increase our paradox of choice

    1. if you’re looking for a tool to increase your metacognition, try Roam Research.

      Roam Research is one of the tool suggestions to improve your metacognition

    2. Metacognition, put simply, is “thinking about thinking” or “knowing about knowing.” It’s being aware of your own awareness so you can determine the best strategies for learning and problem-solving, as well as when to apply them. The word “metacognition” literally means “above cognition”—it’s one of the most powerful forms of self-monitoring and self-regulation. It’s a fancy word for something fairly simple once you break it down.

      Metacognition

    1. Middle School Project: Public Art

      STEAM!!!! Google Maps walking tour, kinetic sculpture to install Teacher Planning Session, connecting learning

      Existing art that students are studying in history Click on art and information they have found about it comes up Applies to real-world--their community Writing proposals for installation of their works of public art

      No "paint by numbers"

      Let students explore the process! The products will be so creative--things you have not even thought about

      "Science fair" or "expo" of ideas

      Students taking ownership of ideas

    1. Instead of viewing plays as individual texts to be studied and examined, theatre knowledge building invites teachers and students to examine the work together, to question why the play was written, to understand the relationship between form and content, to see how the play fits within theatre history and the work of the playwright, and to ask how the play has been performed and what challenges it presents to other theatre workers.

      Make it an open-ended question that leads to conversation between students

    1. Engaging students in a three-month long project where they create their own short plays with the guidance of a workingplaywright, this festival not only allows students from St. Sylvester to explore playwriting, but to do so in collaboration with another class at a nearby Member School, St. Henry.

      Way to collaborate with places outside of the school

    2. For example, in November 2014, the Grade 3/4 class at at St. Sylvester participated in a learning project devoted to set and costume design in connection with the theatre’s production of James and the Giant Peach

      Teaching design to students, can this be a collaborative project with people from multiple locations?

    1. are grouped intentionally to provide a mix of skill levels,

      Zone of Proximal Development -Vygotsky; by mixing skill levels, students at a lower skill will learn from those at a higher skill; those at a higher skill will better understand the process/concept by helping teach those at lower skills

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to one another to solve problems not only builds collaboration skills but leads to deeper learning and understanding.

      Students can teach one another--assessment of understanding Asking each other questions before asking the teacher

      Group work empowers a student's cultivation of resilience

      Creates habits of mind

      Going over homework in groups, if no resolution to a problem, talk about it as a class, asking groupmates to help (and they are helpful--how do you inspire helpful intentions?)

      Classwork harder than homework--need to talk to one another to solve problems

      Talk about problems before taking pencil to paper

      Can you see one another; check ego at door; be willing to take risks; throw out ideas even if not fully formed, others can add to it

      Different roles to fill: discussion: scribe, mapper, moderator

      How did you do? Encourage quieter students to engage, have peers help them out somehow

      Respect individual, celebrate small victories

    1. opportunities for mastery of specialist language and practices.

      Opportunities for mastery in a safe, non-graded space

    2. xperiences invite participation and provide many different ways for individuals and groups to contribute.

      Participatory: web literacy

    3. Digital and net-worked media offer new ways of expanding the reach and accessibility of connected learning so it is not just privileged youth who have these opportunities.

      So many online communities to choose from, but as of yet do not discuss the safety/privacy/security of connecting with these online communities

    4. learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity.

      Definition of connected learning

    5. Clarissa

      Clarissa's interest in fan fiction led to her joining a supportive online community where they participated in editing and revising (changing to make better versions of writers) and gave her the opportunity to get accepted to Chapman and Emerson

    1. There was also opportunity to connect with other students.

      I'm glad you had at least a little bit of this. The system I saw used for third graders left almost zero space for inter-student interaction or socialization which was a miserable experience.

    1. Motivating Learners

      Trajectory vs. fixed point Idea of play, how do we play with current knowledge/tech? Learners look at how can change what they are doing in order to make it better, constantly looking at change and able to embrace change Find communities of doers in what you are interested in Teach how to join Tinkering brings thought and action together

    1. They do this by being sponsors of what youth are genuinely interested in — recognizing diverse interests and providing mentorship, space, and other resources.

      Find what students are interested in, give them the resources to find supportive groups and opportunities to explore those interests!

    2. Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunity

      Yes! A goal of mine as an educator is to help students become life long learners. I believe that by teaching to students' interests, we can help develop that love! I like the ideas about relationships as support and opportunities that come as a result.

    1. Determine if who is using my computer is me by training a ML model with data of how I use my computer. This is a project for the Intrusion Detection Systems course at Columbia University.
    1. (This is why writing is important. It’s harder to fool yourself that you understand something when you sit down to write about it and it comes out all disjointed and confused. Writing forces clarity.)

      This is why I like to repeat that writing shapes your understanding of the topic

    2. (This is why writing is important. It’s harder to fool yourself that you understand something when you sit down to write about it and it comes out all disjointed and confused. Writing forces clarity.)

      This is why I like to repeat that writing shapes your understanding of the topic

    3. One component of it is energy: thinking hard takes effort, and it’s much easier to just stop at an answer that seems to make sense, than to pursue everything that you don’t quite get down an endless, and rapidly proliferating, series of rabbit holes.

      To think in an intelligent way, you need to take effort (energy)

    4. What this means is that you can internalize good intellectual habits that, in effect, “increase your intelligence”. ‘Intelligence’ is not fixed.

      Fix your intelligence with the right habits

    5. Intelligent people simply aren’t willing to accept answers that they don’t understand — no matter how many other people try to convince them of it, or how many other people believe it, if they aren’t able to convince them selves of it, they won’t accept it.

      Question authority

    6. The smartest person I’ve ever known had a habit that, as a teenager, I found striking. After he’d prove a theorem, or solve a problem, he’d go back and continue thinking about the problem and try to figure out different proofs of the same thing. Sometimes he’d spend hours on a problem he’d already solved.

      Take your time and ponder

    1. digitally mediated networked learning

      It's interesting to make this distinction. While I recognize that networked learning pre-dates the rise of the web, I suspect many students and educators would equate "network" with "the internet" at this point (and the internet means "Web 2.0" - that is, a collaborative space where the user/creator distinction is blurred).

    1. 1. The first weeks of school should be devoted to community building and digital competency.

      This article gives a good insight into how we can use tech in the current circumstances we are in

    1. Each tutorial chapter will have a 'Show me' button that you can click if you get stuck following the instructions. Try not to rely on it too much; you will learn faster by figuring out where to put each suggested code block and manually typing it in to the editor.
  3. www.literacyworldwide.org www.literacyworldwide.org
    1. Think of the use of social media during the Arab Spring. People used social media in a way that went far beyond knowing how to click and deep into civic uses and navigating ways to communicate with others under the radar of a communication-hindering government. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

      This example shows the importance of technology and social media not only within the classroom, but also in the real world in how events are interpreted and analyzed. This is a very crucial skill in teaching humanities related courses such as ELA and Social Studies. In particular, social media can encourage students to be more thoughtful about the origin and biases of a particular source.

    1. Teachers must have access to high-quality UbD curriculum materials. Weak or flawed examples convey the wrong idea of what UbD curriculum should look like, and teachers who use imperfect resources

      How do we ensure that all schools obtain high-quality UbD curriculum materials?

    2. This, too, is false. Indeed, the data from released national tests show conclusively that the students have the most difficulty with those items that require understanding and transfer, not recall or recognition.

      This can possibly be due to the mentality of "Teaching to the test" where teachers focus on having students memorize rather than analyze information to prepare them for standardized testing.

    1. The lessons you learn from chess are generalizable only at a high level (e.g. a bad plan is better than no plan). But if you have games that are (a) fun and (b) accurate for some aspects of reality, such as KSP or Factorio, you do get learning that is real and transferable. The challenge is in making games that satisfy both constraints.

      Chess to be a good educator misses the accuracy for some aspects of reality

    1. Our membership inference attack exploits the observationthat machine learning models often behave differently on thedata that they were trained on versus the data that they “see”for the first time.

      How well would this work on some of the more recent zero-shot models?

    1. data leakage (data from outside of your test set making it back into your test set and biasing the results)

      This sounds like the inverse of “snooping”, where information about the test data is inadvertently built into the model.

  4. Jun 2020
    1. There really are only two things you can do: you can present a challenge (which will drive learning), or you can provide resources that people can pull on when they are challenged. A resource can be a map, a person, Google, a checklist, a video, a guide…

      Thinking about how this applies to library instruction. We're limited in our ability to present challenges - that is up to the course instructor - and so we mostly provide resources. We need to reach out to the instructors to get them to put learning challenges in front of students

    1. So it makes sense that video games would be the primary educational environment of the future: they are the best way we have of (a) creating simulations of reality (b) with fast feedback loops (c) accessible at low cost.

      Games as the future of learning

    2. Video games will become a core component of education. This sounds absurd, but consider that simulations are already used widely for learning
      • Kerbal Space Program
      • Flight simulators
      • Factorio
      • Programming environments
    3. When you understand something very well it’s almost as though you can play around with it using all your senses — touch, feeling, space.
    4. The fundamental principle of education is to give students an environment, and tools, where they can make discoveries themselves. This requires space, and time, and autonomy.
    1. There are four types among those who sit before the sages: a sponge, a funnel, a strainer and a sieve.A sponge, soaks up everything; A funnel, takes in at one end and lets out at the other; A strainer, which lets out the wine and retains the lees; A sieve, which lets out the coarse meal and retains the choice flour.
    2. There are four types of disciples: Quick to comprehend, and quick to forget: his gain disappears in his loss; Slow to comprehend, and slow to forget: his loss disappears in his gain; Quick to comprehend, and slow to forget: he is a wise man; Slow to comprehend, and quick to forget, this is an evil portion.
    1. Here are a few recommendations for designing a Faculty Learning Community centered around new technologies: Evolving Outcomes: Begin with clear outcomes for the community, and ask faculty to articulate their own project objectives in their applications for participation. However, keep in mind that there is an inherent openness to this process. Rework project outcomes as needed and provide progress updates at the beginning of each meeting. Multi-channel Communication: Include multiple types of interactions throughout the term to meet the many needs of participating faculty. Allow the participants to design the format of their face-to-face group meetings. Then supplement these scheduled sessions with one-on-one design meetings, online communications, self-help resources, and triage sessions. Campus Partners: Use the participant applications to imagine what types of support the faculty might need, and identify the people on campus best able to offer this support. Reach out to these campus partners in advance of the FLC, gauging their interest and availability to offer demonstrations, create online learning tools, purchase technologies, or meet with faculty one-on-one. Community Building: Remember that this is a community, and build it as such: work to develop a good rapport among participants; listen deeply to each participants’ goals; learn about disciplines outside of one’s own; require a certain level of participation; and bring drinks and food. Good learning environments tend to blend the formal and informal, supplementing expectations and plans with the free flowing nature of discussion and discovery.

      I am especially interested in the "Evolving Outcomes" mentioned. How do we go about articulating initial outcomes for an FLC at my organization?

    2. FLCs are extended gatherings (typically a semester or more) in which participants organize around a clear objective but in an informal structure. Perhaps most importantly, the FLC itself is a process that develops as the group proceeds. The community members work together to direct the shape of the experience. This design engenders ownership (Cox & Richlin, 2011; Moore & Hicks 2014) in the project without requiring the faculty to become technical experts—ownership that promotes sustainable success.

      Very brief definition of faculty learning community.

    3. Building Faculty Learning Communities: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 97, edited by Milton D. Cox, and Laurie Richlin, John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2011.

      Check LSU Libraries for this resource?

    1. prioritize technology, for example, as these are easier elements to hook onto

      In my campus's summer professional development, prep for next term's "remote learning," many colleagues are seeing this limitation. Tech is the sparkly thing, easy to focus on. We say "pedagogy before technology," but many are really focused on what tech to use, how to preserve as much of last year's f2f as possible, etc. Most of which isn't helping plan for fall classes.

    1. Android is an operating system based on Linux with a Java programming interface for mobile devices such as Smartphone (Touch Screen Devices who supports Android OS) as well for Tablets too.  

      Android is an operating system based on Linux with a Java programming interface for mobile devices such as Smartphone (Touch Screen Devices who supports Android OS) as well for Tablets too.

      To learn more about android visit Android Tutorial

    1. Bootstrap is an open-source HTML, CSS, and JavaScript framework for building responsive and mobile-first applications on the web.

      Bootstrap is an open-source HTML, CSS, and JavaScript framework for building responsive and mobile-first applications on the web. To learn more about bootstrap visit Bootstrap Tutorial

    1. LINQ means Language Integrated Query and it was introduced in .NET Framework 3.5 to query the data from different data sources such as collections, generics, XML Documents, ADO.NET Datasets, SQL, Web Service, etc. in C# and VB.NET. 

      LINQ means Language Integrated Query and it was introduced in .NET Framework 3.5 to query the data from different data sources such as collections, generics, XML Documents, ADO.NET Datasets, SQL, Web Service, etc. in C# and VB.NET. To learn more about LINQ visit LINQ Tutorial

    1. Visual Basic (VB) is an object-oriented programming language and that enables the developers to build a variety of secure and robust applications that run on the .NET Framework.

      Visual Basic (VB) is an object-oriented programming language and that enables the developers to build a variety of secure and robust applications that run on the .NET Framework.

      To learn more about visual basic refer Visual Basic (VB.NET) Tutorial

    1. DO NOT, DO NOT, DO NOT turn Japanese into work. Don’t turn it into “study”; don’t turn it into 勉強 (a word that refers to scholastic study in Japanese, but actually carries the rather negative meaning of “coercion” in Chinese). Just play at it. PLAY. That’s why I keep telling people: don’t make all these rules about what is and is not OK for you to do in Japanese, or how Gokusen is over-coloured by the argot of juvenile delinquents or watching Love Hina will make you talk like a girl — it doesn’t matter, you need to learn all that vocabulary in order to truly be proficient in Japanese anyway, so whatever you watch is fine — as long as you’re enjoying it right now. Write this on your liver: just because anything is OK to watch in Japanese, that doesn’t mean that everything is worth watching…to you that is. One person’s Star Trek is another person’s…well, I can’t imagine how any human being could fail to love Star Trek, but you get the idea.

      If you want to learn something, make sure that you keep it in the realm of play. If you make it work, you will kill it.

      This reminds me of Mark Sisson talking about incorporating play.

      This also reminds me of the concept of Flow.

    1. At the same time, a positive emotional experience alone is not enough. For tools for thought to attain enduring power, the user must experience a real growth in mastery, an expansion in their ability to act. And so we’d like to take both the emotional and intellectual experience of tools for thought seriously.

      How can they also reach the idea of "flow"?

    1. Some free, digital Zettelkastens include zettelkasten.de, zettlr, and roamresearch. I use Roam.

      One of the best solutions to implement Zettelkastens: Roam. However, in my case OneNote is doing fine. Maybe I can switch to Roam if I will start working on a specific research problem?

    2. The key is to make connections between ideas during note-taking, way before you need to review them for your work. This forces you to actively connect the dots (during note-taking) and lets you find relevant ideas with ease in future.

      How Zettelkasten works:

      • Write each idea you come across on a card.
      • Link idea cards to other relevant idea cards (idea -> idea link).
      • Sort cards into broader topic boxes (idea -> topic link)
    3. German sociologist Niklas Luhmann. One thing you should know about Luhmann—he was extremely productive. In his 40 years of research, he published more than 70 books and 500 scholarly articles. How did he do accomplish this? He credits it to his Zettelkasten which focuses on connections between notes.

      To be super productive, Niklas Luhmann used to take notes relating to each other

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  5. May 2020