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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Mute inner speech can appear as an inner dialogue as well, but its truncated form encourages us to create a ‘secret’ abbreviated language and deploy mental shortcuts. By forcing us to articulate ourselves more fully, self-talk summons up the image of an imagined listener or interrogator more vividly. In this way, it allows us to question ourselves more critically by adopting an external perspective on our ideas, and so to consider shortcomings in our arguments – all while using our own speech.

      The essential difference between mute speach and self-talk

    2. Contemporary theories in cognition and the science of learning reaffirm Kleist’s speculations, and show how self-talk contributes not only to motivation and emotional regulation, but also to some higher cognitive functions such as developing metacognition and reasoning.

      Self-talk brings lots of benefits

    3. It’s no coincidence that we walk when we need to think: evidence shows that movement enhances thinking and learning, and both are activated in the same centre of motor control in the brain. In the influential subfield of cognitive science concerned with ‘embodied’ cognition, one prominent claim is that actions themselves are constitutive of cognitive processes. That is, activities such as playing a musical instrument, writing, speaking or dancing don’t start in the brain and then emanate out to the body as actions; rather, they entail the mind and body working in concert as a creative, integrated whole, unfolding and influencing each other in turn. It’s therefore a significant problem that many of us are trapped in work and study environments that don’t allow us to activate these intuitive cognitive muscles, and indeed often even encourage us to avoid them.

      Symbiosis of movement and thinking

  2. Jan 2021
    1. during the backward pass, feedback connectionsare used in concert with forward connections to dynamically invert the forward transformation,thereby enabling errors to flow backward
  3. Dec 2020
    1. It is probably fair to say that the amount of time spent preparing the online component of blended learning is influenced considerably by the experience, knowledge and skills of the teacher.

      Sure. But it's also fair to say that this is true of teachers' preparation of offline learning materials.

    2. lthough some studies might argue that creating blended learning materials could take longer to prepare than traditional teaching, other studies argue that preparing for online teaching takes less time than typical face-to-face teaching preparation

      But people often tend to discount the work (and frameworks that guide this work) that's already gone into the preparation of F2F materials.

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    1. The theme and motivation in this paper is that Auto-ML can streamline building machine learning models by non-experts in healthcare. What is not clear is why they need to. A more prevalent question is how to streamline use of algorithms based on machine/deep learning in healthcare setting.

    2. This is a good manuscript to assign as a reading to the Machine Learning for Medical Applications course

    3. Overall, this is a good overview of what is out there vis-a-vis Auto-ML, associated concepts, and variations.

    1. No escape plan was ever devised

      Not for the institutions, nor for students, who have no way to export their learning data (content, connections, relationships with peers, etc.) out of the system in a way that could be integrated into something outside of the institution.

    2. The skills gained immediately transfer to other areas of academic work, such as community and industry engagement

      Another example of why online learning could (should?) take place in public.

      Imagine if, upon graduating, an engineer already had an online, public portfolio of work that could be shared with potential employers.

    1. Treating the web as a compile target has a lot of implications, many negative. For example “view source” is a beloved feature of the web that’s an important part of its history and especially useful for learning, but Svelte’s compiled output is much harder to follow than its source. Source maps, which Svelte uses to map its web language outputs back to its source language, have limitations.
    1. Keep in mind that as a software developer, of any degree, learning is continuous. New technologies, new ways to write code, not so new approaches, persisting patterns. Read books, watch online courses, follow tutorials, keep learning!
    1. Microsoft says it will make changes in its new Productivity Score feature, including removing the ability for companies to see data about individual users, to address concerns from privacy experts that the tech giant had effectively rolled out a new tool for snooping on workers.

      It's great that MS has reacted so quickly to the outcry around the privacy of workers.

      I thought it would be super-interesting to see how academics might have responded to the idea of institutional administrators keeping tabs on the number of hours that they'd spent in meetings (via Teams), composing and reading emails (via Outlook), writing articles (via Word), and so on.

      And yet these would be the same academics who do this kind of monitoring of student work.

    1. Central to the approach is defining a large hierarchical optimization problem that involves identifying data transforms and the machine learning models themselves, in addition to the hyperparameters for the models

      Essentially, python auto-ml library does the leg-work for building the model and optimizing its macro structure

    1. Jeff Sonnabend in the Ecco Yahoo forum: "I remember first trying to learn Ecco 1.0. It was tough until the proverbial light went on. Then it all made sense. For me, it was simply understanding that Ecco is just a data base. So called folders are nothing more than fields in a flat-file table (like a spreadsheet). The rest is interface and implementation of various users' work or management systems in Ecco. That learning curve, to me, is the primary Ecco "weakness", at least as far as new users go."

      There was a steep learning curve involved with using ECCO Pro. Reminds me of Roam, which also has a steep learning curve, but then it feels like it's worth it.

    1. If you give any question to a student that has a clear, definitive answer, you are tempting them to cheat.

      We should be assessing how people use information to solve problems they care about, rather than whether or not they can recall information.

  4. Nov 2020
    1. If we’re honest, we’ll admit that we forget 95% of what we learn in a class. What sticks? A scattered analogy or diagram.
    2. Analogy – ? Diagram – Google Images Example – Khan Academy for practice problems Plain-English – Forums like /r/math or Math Overflow Technical – Wikipedia or MathWorld

      ADEPT learning method (Analogy, Diagram, Example, Plain-English, Technical)

    1. encouraged tutors to educate their students through practice, travel, and human interaction. In doing so, he argued that students would become active learners, who could claim knowledge for themselves.

      主动学习者的技能是一旦获得终生受用的。因为经历过的实践,旅行,和人际关系,带来幸福感和挫折感都成了宝贵的财富。即使主动学习带来的乐趣和痛苦分量相当,人脑也只会记住幸福感,而忘却痛苦,对新事物的纯求知乐趣会成为一辈子的习性。

    2. students would become passive adults, blindly obeying and lacking the ability to think on their own

      实践出来的真知有天然的科学思辨性,因为实践的过程不可能是一帆风顺,所有通过坚毅得出真知的实践,都面对过不同程度不同视角的挑战,换句话说,是经过思辨选择之后的结果。这样提炼之后形成的思维更经得起未来的考研,更全面和更容易的未以后的实践中最决策产生正面的效应,从而产生认知正循环。相比之下认识负循环和内循环,这容易用一个没经过实践验证过的理论去解释另一个正在经历的实践的失败结果。

    3. successful students were those who were encouraged to question new information and study it for themselves

      满足好奇心是学习的最强内驱力

    1. Scenario

      Inshot Storytelling app, Video Editor & Video Maker InShot has a lot of photo and video editing features in one. There is a small learning curve. Many girls on the field have creatively combined photo and video content, applied effects and enhancements to specific sections and added transitions too. Harnessing the capabilities of InShot for storytelling has immense possibilities. It could potentially lead to a creators movement where people share details about their lives through videos and narration. It also could be used for product stories and marketing. InShot app runs on a phone and ASPi is used as a repository and exchange node - during COVID lockdown, a server online is also used so physical movement is reduced.

      Syncthing. A continuous file synchronization program Ever thought of connotations of sharing in today’s world. Well, Syncthing allows us to securely backup data without the need to trust a third-party cloud provider. Sharing and syncing files between devices on a local network or over the internet is made easier through Syncthing. This could help in fostering community archives as access to files over multiple devices can be made effortless. In localised sense, people can also look up resources or their queries and find answers with their peers.

    2. Scenario 1

      Kolibri The offline app for universal education Kolibri makes high quality education technology available in low-resource communities such as rural schools, refugee camps, orphanages, non-formal school systems, and prison systems. While the internet has thoroughly transformed the availability of educational content for much of the world, many people still live in places where online access is poor or even nonexistent. Kolibri is a great solution for these communities. It's an app that creates an offline server to deliver high-quality educational resources to learners. What makes Kolibri unique is that it offers a way to bring different content sources offline into a central repository in a structured way. Beyond that, it brings in a host of tools to help align the content with national and local curricular standards, and on the student side it offers a self-paced personalized learning experience with support tools for teachers to track student progress. Kolibri can be envisioned also for local teaching, DIY courses, self initiated inquiries, equal opportunities for 21st century skills etc.

    1. ഭാഷാ പഠനത്തിന്റെ രീതിശാസ്ത്രം നേരിട്ടു നടത്തേണ്ടതല്ല. കുട്ടികള്‍ സ്വയം നടത്തേണ്ടതാണ് എന്നുള്ളതാണ് ഇതിലെ ഭാഷാ ആര്‍ജ്ജനവുമായി ബന്ധപ്പെട്ട തിയറി. പുതിയ പുസ്തകങ്ങള്‍ SCERT യില്‍ നിന്നു കണ്ടെത്തി ഇപ്പൊഴും ഇത് തന്നെ ആണോ പിന്തുടരുന്ന രീതി എന്നു മനസിലക്കല്‍ അനിവാര്യമാണ്.

    1. Knowledge of the names, sounds, and symbols of the let-ters of the alphabet or alphabetic knowledge is essential forlearning to read and write. Alphabet knowledge (AK) isconsistently recognized as the strongest, most durablepredictor of later achievement in literacy includingdecoding, comprehension, and spelling (National EarlyLiteracy Panel2008)

      ഭാഷാ പഠനത്തിന്റെ അടിസ്ഥാനശിലകളില്‍ ഒന്നു അക്ഷരങ്ങളെ തിരിച്ചറിയാനും എഴുതാനും കഴിയുക എന്നുള്ളതാണ് എന്നു സമര്‍ഥിക്കുന്ന പഠനങ്ങള്‍ അന്വേഷിക്കണം.

    2. Alphabet knowledge is consistently recognizedas the strongest, most durable predictor of later literacyachievemen

      അടിസ്ഥാനമുറയ്ക്കുക എന്നുള്ളതാണ് ഒരു ഭാഷയുടെ ഉപയോഗത്തിന് ആവശ്യംവേണ്ട ഘടകം. അക്ഷരമാലാ പഠനത്തിന് ഇത്തരത്തില്‍ കാര്യമായ പ്രസക്തിയുണ്ട്.

    1. When you’re implementing a bad plan yourself, instead of having a mentor bail you out by fixing it, a few really useful things happen:You learn many more details about why it was a bad idea. If someone else tells you your plan is bad, they’ll probably list the top two or three reasons. By actually following through, you’ll also get to learn reasons 4–1,217.You spend about 100x more time thinking about how you’ll avoid ever making that type of mistake again, i.e., digesting what you’ve learned and integrating it into your overall decision-making.By watching my mistakes and successes play out well or badly over the course of months, I was able to build much more detailed, precise models about what does and doesn’t matter for long-term codebase health. Eventually, that let me make architectural decisions with much more conviction.

      There's a benefit to embarking on a challenge without a more experienced authority to bail you out.

      • You learn many more details about why it's a bad idea.
      • The lessons you learn in terms of how to avoid the mistakes you made stick with you longer

      (I would add that the experience is more visceral, it activates more modalities in your brain, and you remember it much more clearly.)

      These types of experiences result in what the author calls more "detailed, precise models". For me they result in a sort of intuition.

    1. Self-Directed Learning: A Core Concept in Adult Education

      Svein Loeng. (2020). Self-Directed Learning: A Core Concept in Adult Education. Education Research International, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/3816132

    1. Mistakes programmers need to look out for

      • Programming is more about practicising than passive knowledge gain.
      • Understand the solutions solved/suggest by your peers, introspect on why he could solve it better and why you couldn't.
      • Be a perpetual learner.
      • Don't just reuse, reuse and add value.
      • Re-affirm and reconfirm your learning.
    2. being a programmer you should always make sure that you learn by yourself and create things by yourself
    1. Thanks for posting this helpful, well written article. Learning programming, or any other thing one takes up, requires you to sit at one place have a plan of action for your study.

      I was going through my Firefox bookmarks and I found article. I had read this article two years back and had commented that I found it to be useful. I read it back in May 2018. As of now, November 2020, my programming skills are still novice-level. I haven't implemented the ideas or followed suggestions given here.

      It has been 2 years and 5 months since I found this article to be relevant and it baffles me that I haven't taken action by making use of the knowledge given in this article. Two long years flew by. I guess reviewing my bookmarks is something that I will do more often.

      The article was posted on May 23, 2018 and I had stumbled on it the next day itself, i.e., May 24, 2018. This gets me thinking that we could finds solutions for problems(latest ones in this case) once we identify it, articulate it, hit the search button and just read stuff. I could presume that what happened next was that I misunderstood "finding a solution" to "realizing the solution", and perhaps became complacent or maybe there were more problems that didn't come to my awareness to identify and further find solutions. I'm not quite sure. Should I have identified my problems and googled more so that I could have learned C and C++ sooner?

      I wonder what held me back from taking action to accomplish and master something that usually takes not more that 5-6 months maximum.

    1. Project Euler

      Project Euler emphasises on programming challenges that involve problem solving and critical thinking skills.

    2. It’s powered by a large set of problems to work with, and you can also gain access to the source codes that others used to solve the given coding challenges.

      You'll learn more when you read others' code and immitate it. CodeChef provides you access to learn from others' code.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. E-LEARNING IMPLICATIONS FOR ADULT LEARNING

      The authors spend time noting and comparing new perspectives between andragogy and pedagogy. The authors compare teaching strategies and personality types. They conclude by defining several rules observed for e-learning in adult education.

      Rating: 7/10

      Note: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1013743

    2. E-Learning Implications for Adult Learning

      (Click Download full text to read.) In this brief article, the authors contrast the child and adult learner. Highlighting the adult learner's characteristics, the article further discusses factors that might affect the individual learning style. Furthermore, the authors discuss these styles in the context of eLearning (extravert, introvert, sensory type, intuitive adult, reflexive type, affective type, rational type, and perceptive type). Each learning type and preferred eLearning method is illustrated (Table 1, p. 60). Rationale for the implementation of eLearning is detailed (p. 61). Guidelines for the use of eLearning is discussed. (6/10)

    1. Rather than the night before a quiz or exam, it may be more important to sleep well for the duration of the time when the topics tested were taught. The implications of these findings are that, at least in the context of an academic assessment, the role of sleep is crucial during the time the content itself is learned, and simply getting good sleep the night before may not be as helpful.
    1. This collection of forty theme-based readers utilizes authentic photographs and stories to explore topics immediately relevant to adult newcomers

      Adult ESL resources

    1. fact, Woices, iSpeech and Voki can be used for the post-listening stage. You may decide, for example, to have your learners create their own Voki as a response. T

      Just additional resources for the language learners.

    1. 480Gabriela Grosseck / Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences 1 (2009) 478–482 2. Web 2.0 – Opportunities and Challenges for Higher

      Great perspectives considering you're making an investment...you would want to know the advantages.

    1. Metacognition is one’s ability to use prior knowledge to plan a strategy for approaching a learning task, take necessary steps to problem solve, reflect on and evaluate

      Metacognition will be studied as it relates to self- regulated learning.

    1. Applying Knowles’ 5 Adult Learning Theory Assumptions to eLearning Assumption #1 (Self-Concept)

      I have read about these five assumptions in prior journal readings.

    1. It is essential to help students develop research abilities in the classroom and through faceted assignments.  What are faceted assignments?  After providing guidance in class, the professor assigns each aspect of a research assignment – development of a research problem statement, location of relevant resources, evaluation of resources, and so on – as its own mini-assignment, which is graded promptly, with sufficient comments to enable students to revise and resubmit.  By the time the final research assignment is complete, it carries the benefit of a significant amount professorial mentoring.

      Research skills involve complex, higher order tasks, and they take long-term efforts to learn well. Adult students are better able to do research than younger students do. They need to learn how to understand the different sources available, formulate good questions, learn more advanced database searching skills, and hone their critical thinking skills. Instead of assigning a research paper, instructors should assign each step of the paper so that they can help students properly master the whole process. 8/10

    1. Older adults are not newcomers to computer and Internet technologies. According to Hilt and Lipschultz ([16]), they use the Internet to communicate with family, friends, and business associates and research personal interests. In 2003, Heineman and Kim stated that older adults were the fastest growing group of Internet users in the United States (followed closely by individuals between the ages of 55–64). Communication via the Internet helps older adults remain informed of situations involving family and friends, stay

      Adult Learners do represent a mixed age group. For that reason, I am learning more about the population by reading this article about ages over 65.

    1. This would be another great source for support. The information so far will provide insight on my mixed group of adult learners. It would be helpful in revealing a sort of hidden factor in the learning process.

    2. While individuals use these tools in the hope that their training will improve their performance, this relationship is not a given. This paper proposes that an individual's level of digital literacy affects her performance through its impact on her performance and effort expectations. To explain the influence of digital li

      This is the very reason I selected this paper. Digital literacy is also a factor in determining one's technological acumen.

    1. There would seem to be a happy confluence between constructivist ideas about learning and trends in Internet usage. Self-directed learning through a collaborative and participative environment with other students is recognised as being a good, or even the best, approach in many contexts (Guthrie et

      Yes that was the impression I hot. Because of this misconception I feel that many of us students sometimes hold... Reality is that real students feel real anxiety in the midst of sharing information.

    1. “Outdoor adult learning can be an antidote and complement to the digital world . . . offering holistic, mentally and physically challenging learning experiences.”

      Adult Learning often takes place within walls or in front of a computer screen this can lead to health problems. This article offers reasons and methods for getting adults outdoors and using Universal Design. Outdoor learning can be used to complement digital learning.

    1. Adults as Learners:Effective Teaching Strategies

      Give practical information and tips for teaching adults.

    1. Self-regulation supports learning and performance on specific tasks through the following: Metacognitive knowledge about academic work. Strategies for analyzing tasks. Metacognitive knowledge about task-specific strategies (e.g., for managing work, learning mathematics, comprehending texts, writing paragraphs). Skills for implementing strategies. Strategies for self-monitoring and strategic use of feedback.

      Self-regulated Learning supports metacognition.

    1. emotional intelligence in initiating the process of self-directed learning among the employees of Bhilai Steel Plant.

      I am not certain where humanism comes into play here. But I recently read some information about it in another article.

    1. The Golden Question: What Motivates Adult Learners?  You have to persuade adult learners to rearrange their busy schedule and make time to take your eLearning courses. But it is easier said than done. Motivating adult learners can be quite a challenge unless you know what makes them tick and what compels them to prioritize and take action. Below are some clues.

      Engaging adult learners requires an understanding of their motives. Tapping the motivation of the individual learner is the key to fostering high engagement levels. This article offers four key areas to consider and take action on. Rating 8/10

    1. There is NO one adult learning theory. There are several prevalent theories that all explain— from different perspectives—how adults learn. In this article specifically we will address: 1) andragogy, 2) experiential learning, 3) transformational learning. There are many other theories though! However, all of them have one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      There are many ideas regarding adult learning theory. Understanding andragogy, experiential learning, and transformational learning will help course creators provide better outcomes for adult learners. Rating 7/10

    1. While there are multiple methodologies to make this happen, there is a model proposed by Lila Davachi, Associate Professor of Psychology at New York University that is known to be effective. Known as AGES (Attention-Generation-Emotion-Spacing), this model highlights four key elements that are essential for effective adult learning to happen. 

      Accommodating adult learners expectations, demands, and challenges in eLearning design will foster better engagement. Utilizing the four step method known as AGES provides a model effective adult learning. Rating 8/10

    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. Synchronous learning occurs in real time and can help students feel connected even if their learning experience takes place primarily online. Synchronous teaching should not be the only way to deliver a lecture—asynchronous elements are also essential. Real-time learning gives students an opportunity to connect with peers and instructors face to face. Live teaching—via video stream—can also replicate the feel of an in-class environment, where instructors and students are present in the same place at the same time.

      Video can be used in synchronous and asynchronous learning in the class and online. This article shares 4 tools for online learning. Rating 6/10

    1. Online education has grown in popularity and accessibility, attracting students with its schedule-friendly format options. These formats can be grouped broadly into two categories: synchronous and asynchronous. Synchronous learning is online or distance education that happens in real time, often with a set class schedule and required login times. Asynchronous learning does not require real-time interaction; instead, content is available online for students to access when it best suits their schedules, and assignments are completed to deadlines. Programs can also use a hybrid learning model, which includes a blend of both formats.

      Synchronous and asynchronous learning can be used interchangeably in class and online. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of both formats to help students select the program that is most suitable. Rating 10/10

    1. Adult learning theories are not just a collection of jargons, concepts, and ideas about how adults learn. These theories help you plan your course during conception, development, and execution, in a way that will facilitate the learning process.

      Outlines adult learning "theories": Andragogy, Transformational Learning, and Experiential Learning, and states that they are important to educational designers, but doesn't really connect them to instructional design, let alone e-design. 3/10

    2. Insights 3 Adult Learning Theories Every E-Learning Designer Must Know

      Adult learning theories for Instructional Designers - Article names adult learning "theories" (andragogy, neuroscience, experiential learning, SDL, and transformational learning). Discusses why these "theories" are relevant to ID. Rating 3/10

    1. Higher education institutions need to address these challenges, and technological tools — even some surprisingly simple ones — can go a long way toward enhancing the college experience for older students, says Brian Fleming, executive director of the Sandbox ColLABorative at Southern New Hampshire University.

      Older students (over 25) are often changing careers. They tend to have more responsibilities than traditional college students, and a lower threshold for micro-frustrations like bureaucracy, form. Colleges should accommodate them with things like digital signatures and virtual meeting availability. Technology should be platform-agnostic for them (and everyone). 5/10

    2. Technology Can Help Adult Learners Get the Most Out of Higher Ed

      (Available as transcript or podcast.) This article reviews the definition of the adult learner, identifying their particular learning needs and challenges. Considerations and recommendations for implementing technology are discussed (agnostic software, alleviate micro-frustrations). 5/10

    1. While our program still faces some challenges around engaging our students and keeping them enrolled in programs long enough to complete their goals, technology has allowed us to make some remarkable strides.

      A school system that extends to adult education utilizes online apps as an option (but doesn't require internet access, as many people lack it at home). They have found them to be helpful, especially because people who work odd shift jobs and have burst of time at odd hours can get some practice in. This is most helpful for ESL learners. 6/10

    1. Research about adults as learners can inform the design of effective digital learning experiences. Although there is no one principle that can be applied to all adults, the design principles outlined here are based on five of the prevailing theories about how adults learn: andragogy, experiential learning, self-directed learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience.

      This article applies the principles of andragogy, self directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience (all of which seem rather similar), to low-skilled adults, who are likely to lack confidence about learning and who may be learning in bits of free time via cell phone. Emphasizes the importance of an instructor or coach, along with good use of technology. 8/10

    1. Faculty need to focus on learning theory in the design of instructional technology so that they can create lessons that are not only technology-effective but that are meaningful from the learner’s standpoint.

      Fidishun, a librarian and Penn State's satellite campuses, expands Knowles' 6 assumptions of andragogy, and draws out some of their implications for technology-based instruction for adults. This is short and to the point, but readers would benefit from the writer going into greater details. 7/10

    2. Knowles, Holton, and Swanson emphasize that “adults resent and resist situations in which they feel others are imposing their wills on them.” (1998, 65) In spite of their need for autonomy, previous schooling has made them dependent learners. It is the job of the adult educator to move adult students away from their old habits and into new patterns of learning where they become self-directed, taking responsibility for their own learning and the direction it takes. Technology is a perfect path for the facilitation of self-direction. The ultimate ability of initiatives such as web-based learning to be non-linear allows an adult to follow the path that most appropriately reflects their need to learn. It becomes extremely important for those who are designing technology-based adult learning to use all of the capabilities of the technology including branching, the ability to skip sections a student already understands, and multiple forms of presentation of material which can assist people with various learning styles. All of these can be used to permit studentsto follow a path of learning that most appropriately suits them.

      The author, Delores Fidishun, is the Head Librarian at Penn State Abington College and holds a doctorate in education. This article proposes that just adding technology to instruction is not enough. It must be intentional. Fidishun summarizes six assumptions of andragogy which include the learner's need to know, the learner's self-concept, the role of the learner's experience, a student's readiness to learn, the student's orientation to learning, and the student's motivation to learn.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION IN HIGHER EDUCATION: OVERCOMING ANXIETY THROUGH FACULTY BOOTCAMP

      This article uses educational theory to examine why educators feel anxiety in association with learning and using new technologies and how best to teach new technologies without triggering anxiety. 7/10, good discussion of theories and methods along with reasoning.

    1. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATIONTHROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY

      This article examines the effectiveness of learning communities to support integration of technology into classrooms and effective teacher growth in the area of technology proficiencies. 5/10, learning community findings are useful but this source is very targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. Technology Andragogy Work Content Knowledge Model as a New Framework in Vocational Education: Revised Technology Pedagogy Content Knowledge Model

      This article focuses on using adult education theory to integrate technology into vocational education. This expands adult learning opportunities to community colleges and trade schools. 8/10 interesting and different from an equity and accessibility standpoint.

    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

    1. A Comprehensive Exploration of Technology's RoleIin Adult Learning

      This article examines and gives bit of information from a book covering the intersection of adult learning and technology innovation. 4/10, while there is information here it is certainly not the entire book and therefore incomplete. It does serve as a quick and accessible alternative for those seeking the books information but lacking the time/ access to read the book.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

  6. dergipark.org.tr dergipark.org.tr
    1. Blueprint for In-Service Teacher Training Program in Technology Integration

      This article looks at the gap between teacher efficiency in in-person versus online teaching and the need to effectively build teachers' competencies in the are of technology to ensure teachers are not incompetent at teaching online. This study collected data from 122 English language teachers and used the findings to create a blueprint for other institutions hoping to increases teachers' ability to successfully integrate technology into their lessons. 6/10, the study was too small to be truly persuasive scientifically and the findings were more helpful for institutions rather than individual educators.

    1. The Impact of Social Media Technologies on Adult Learning

      This article takes on the challenge of investigating what role social media technologies have in adult learning/ their impact on learning outcomes for adult learners. The data showed that social media technologies follow similar patterns to other educational tools. Teaching method used in conjunction with the technology matters significantly. This being said, the article does make several recommendations for using social media in the classroom to boost adult learning outcomes. 10/10 interesting and relevant article with easy to find and utilize recommendations educators could implement.

    1. METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT IN ADULT LEARNING RESEARCHCOMBINING PHYSIOLOGICAL REACTIONS AND LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN SIMULATION-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

      This article details the methods and results of a research experiment done to determine whether/ how physiological measurement technologies can be used with educational research methods to investigate subjective learning experiences. Describes research methods and data collected. 8/10, very interesting article and a very interesting and well done study but very specific to this one topic. e

    1. Handbook of Research on Student-Centered Strategies in Online Adult Learning Environments

      This article showcases a framework for course design using theory and research in the learning sciences. It defines student-centered learning and explains how it can/ should be used in the creation of the course and when establishing which theories and methods to structure the course around. 9/10, very detailed source.

    1. Adapting adult learning theory to support innovative, advanced, online learning - WVMD Model

      This article details how to build an innovative online learning environment using methods based on influential adult learning theories. These theories include Social Development Theory, Behaviorism, Critical Reflection and Nurturing the Soul. 10/10, many theories throughly discussed.

    1. Preservice Teacher Experience with Technology Integration: How the Preservice Teacher’s Effica-cy in Technology Integration is Impactedby the Context of the Preservice Teacher Education Pro-gram

      This article discusses the need for teacher education to focus just as much on technology knowledge (regardless of grade level taught) as on educational theory and methods. It argues that teachers cannot be effective if they are not trained in not only current technologies, but also taught to be familiar with navigating new technologies as the emerge. 5/10 Very specific to K-12 teacher education.

  7. ecomentor.itee.radom.pl ecomentor.itee.radom.pl
    1. Farewell to Pedagogy

      The Article often compares Andragogy to Pedagogy and how they are different and should not be confused. The Article goes in depth into core assumptions of Andragogy.

      8/10

    1. 4. Engaged, mobile-first learning experiences

      A short article that looks at the future trends of learning and development. One trend it discusses is that time spent on training may be decreasing. Trainers are getting more creative using cell phones to train bite sized chunks. 8/10

    1. At Google, 80% of all tracked trainings are run through an employee-to-employee network called “g2g” (Googler-to-Googler)

      A look at what Googles G2G (Googler-to-Googler) training program is about. It is a short infographic that describes methods that the program uses.

      7/10

    1. Sarah Brown is a Learning Strategist and Designer at Google.

      This is an interview with a google employee about what she does to keep Google heading in the right direction for the development and learning of its employees.

      9/10

    1. Learning & Development Best Practices from the Top Silicon Valley Companies

      Interesting read about what top tech companies are doing to promote a growth mindset within their company. From Google to Amazon each company has a different approach that is working for them.

      7/10

    1. Designing Social Media for Informal Learning and Knowledge Maturing in the Digital Workplace

      Ravenscroft, A., Schmidt, A., Cook, J., & Bradley, C. (2012). Designing Social Media for Informal Learning and Knowledge Maturing in the Digital Workplace. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 28(3), 235–249.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ966042&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      This paper presents an original approach to designing social media that support informal learning in the digital workplace. It adapts design-based research to take into account the embeddedness of interactions within digitally mediated work-based contexts. The approach is demonstrated through the design, implementation, and evaluation of software tools supporting a particular type of informal learning called "knowledge maturing". The paper: introduces and presents the rationale for, and concept of, knowledge maturing; presents a new design methodology for developing social media that support informal learning and knowledge maturing; focuses on one prototype, for "people tagging for organisational development", that was produced by the methodology (and concisely describes two others); presents the formative evaluation of the highlighted prototype; and finally, discusses the implications and insights arising from this work.

      8/10

    1. The Role of Informal Learning in Today's Successful Training Department

      Wittkopf, C., & Berge, Z. L. (2007). The Role of Informal Learning in Today’s Successful Training Department. Journal of Educational Technology, 4(2), 15–22.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1069185&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The integration of work and learning is becoming the dominant means of workforce training in many organizations today. Though structured classroom learning will likely but never entirely recede, a preponderance of current research indicates that the future of most job-related learning will lie in non-traditional methods such as short e-training modules delivered directly to the desktop, podcasts, informal knowledge-sharing sessions, and even structured gaming environments. This paper will explore why such learning is becoming increasingly more critical, how a successful blend of informal and formal learning can achieve the individualized training that a majority of employees are beginning to demand, and the difficulties involved, specifically with respect to evaluation and the ways in which it can be leveraged by a training department. These types of learning can be combined with some traditional training events to create a meaningful learning path for new employees and existing ones alike, and training and development specialists will have to find ways to achieve the right blend to achieve improved workforce performance.

      7/10

    1. 5 Cross-Training Lessons from Disney

      The article focuses on why the cross training practice Disney implements is an effective model and lists its 5 key benefits.

      8/10, its not to in-depth but it provides a great starting point for adult learning in a company.

    1. Informal Learning in the Workplace: Key Activities and Processes

      Cunningham, J., & Hillier, E. (2013). Informal Learning in the Workplace: Key Activities and Processes. Education & Training, 55(1), 37–51

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1005919&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The purpose of this study is to define characteristics and processes that enhance informal learning in a public sector workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Based on interviews and questionnaires, the authors solicited examples of informal learning practices that 40 supervisors experienced during their careers. The examples were content analyzed to define seven broad themes underlying informal learning. Findings: The findings illustrate seven broad themes describing learning activities and processes. The first three themes describe the types of informal learning activities that supervisors found valuable: relationships; learning opportunities enlarging or redesigning their jobs; and enrichment opportunities that provided higher levels of managerial learning. Four themes describe processes for facilitating informal learning: planning processes; active learning and modelling; relationship dynamics; and tying learning to applications. Originality/value: The value of this study is in presenting a possible framework defining informal learning that describes both activities (the what) and the underlying processes (the how) by which they are delivered. Beyond this, it suggests that there is a close connection between the activities and the processes underlying them.

      8/10

    1. Knowledge recommendation for workplace learning: a system design and evaluation perspective

      Shuang Geng, Lijing Tan, Ben Niu, Yuanyue Feng, & Li Chen. (2019). Knowledge recommendation for workplace learning: a system design and evaluation perspective. Internet Research, 30(1), 243–261. https://doi.org/10.1108/INTR-07-2018-0336

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsemr&AN=edsemr.10.1108.INTR.07.2018.0336&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Purpose Although digitalization in the workplace is burgeoning, tools are needed to facilitate personalized learning in informal learning settings. Existing knowledge recommendation techniques do not account for dynamic and task-oriented user preferences. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new design of a knowledge recommender system (RS) to fill this research gap and provide guidance for practitioners on how to enhance the effectiveness of workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach This study employs the design science research approach. A novel hybrid knowledge recommendation technique is proposed. An experiment was carried out in a case company to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system design. Quantitative data were collected to investigate the influence of personalized knowledge service on users’ learning attitude. Findings The proposed personalized knowledge RS obtained satisfactory user feedback. The results also show that providing personalized knowledge service can positively influence users’ perceived usefulness of learning. Practical implications This research highlights the importance of providing digital support for workplace learners. The proposed new knowledge recommendation technique would be useful for practitioners and developers to harness information technology to facilitate workplace learning and effect organization learning strategies. Originality/value This study expands the scope of research on RS and workplace learning. This research also draws scholarly attention to the effective utilization of digital techniques, such as a RS, to support user decision making in the workplace.

      7/10

    1. Where Companies Go Wrong with Learning and Development

      This article by Steve Glaveski reviews common problems in learning in development that companies experience. It ends with a list of things that need change and promptes "Lean Learning".

      8/10

    1. What Are Drivers for Informal Learning?

      Schürmann, E., & Beausaert, S. (2016). What Are Drivers for Informal Learning? European Journal of Training and Development, 40(3), 130–154.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1095233&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Purpose: The topic of informal learning at work has received increasing attention in the past years. The purpose of this study is to explore in which informal learning activities employees engage and what are the drivers for informal learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: Semi-structured interviews were taken from ten human resources (HR) and ten marketing employees working at a German machinery manufacturer. Findings: Employees mostly learn informally by talking or collaborating with others, searching information online, feedback giving and seeking from colleagues and supervisors and reading. Next, it was found that organizational drivers, task and job drivers, personal drivers and formal learning influenced employees' informal learning. Background characteristics on the contrary were not found to influence informal learning. Overall, within these categories, the following drivers had the greatest influence on informal learning: commitment to learning and development, feedback as well as interactions with and support from colleagues and supervisors. Research Limitations/Implications: The design of this exploratory qualitative study brings some limitations. Based on the findings, suggestions for future quantitative and intervention studies are done. Practical Implications: The results show how human resources development (HRD) professionals could better support employees' engagement in informal learning and gives an overview of the determinants that could be influenced and in turn have a positive effect on employees' informal learning. Originality/Value: This study is one of the first studies unraveling informal learning as perceived by employees. It develops a comprehensive framework for categorizing drivers for informal learning.

      8/10

    1. Informal learning in the workplace : The key role of managers

      Informal learning in the workplace : The key role of managers. (2014). Development and Learning in Organizations, 28(2), 26–28. https://doi.org/10.1108/DLO-02-2014-0007

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsemr&AN=edsemr.10.1108.DLO.02.2014.0007&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. – A manager's lot is a tough one at the best of times. There is constant pressure to meet business and client needs, often against a backdrop of constantly dwindling resources. Economic uncertainty has ensured that this balancing act has become even more precarious in recent years. Delivering more for much less is very much the order of the day. Certain areas are notoriously vulnerable when the budget axe is wielded. Training and development is a perfect example. However, this is clearly something of a false economy as few companies will be best positioned to move forward if talent is not properly nurtured. Such short-term thinking continues to prevail though. – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format.

      8/10

    1. Formal and informal learning in the workplace: a research review.

      Manuti, A., Pastore, S., Scardigno, A. F., Giancaspro, M. L., & Morciano, D. (2015). Formal and Informal Learning in the Workplace: A Research Review. International Journal of Training and Development, 19(1), 1–17.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1051188&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The radical economic, social and cultural changes experienced by the labour market within recent decades have helped to highlight the central role played by the learning process in individual career development and organizational success. In such fast‐moving working contexts, skills and competencies rapidly become outdated and need to be continuously implemented and empowered as a strategic factor for global competitiveness. Traditional models of learning both inside and outside of the workplace have become unable to explain the complexity of such a process, weaving between and overlapping formal and informal components. Starting with this premise, the aim of the present paper was to analyse the role of knowledge and experience as important learning frames, which allow the acquisition and development of competencies in the workplace. A human resource development perspective was adopted, aimed at reconciling both the organizational and individual stances implied in the process. The methodology of achieving this was to review the most recent literature on workplace learning, with a special focus on its formal and informal dimensions.

      8/10

    1. Social interactions and workplace learning : The influence of job demands and job resources

      Social interactions and workplace learning : The influence of job demands and job resources. (2020). Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, 34(3), 31–33. https://doi.org/10.1108/DLO-11-2019-0275

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsemr&AN=edsemr.10.1108.DLO.11.2019.0275&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Purpose This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings Businesses that place strong emphasis on workplace learning become better positioned to succeed. Social interactions play a critical role in enabling the informal learning identified as an important aspect of learning overall. Leaders should therefore design tasks to enable such interaction which can become more significant still within culturally heterogeneous firms. Originality/value The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

    1. Informal learning in work environments: training with the Social Web in the workplace.

      Garcia-Penalvo, F. J., Colomo-Palacios, R., & Lytras, M. D. (2012). Informal Learning in Work Environments: Training with the Social Web in the Workplace. Behaviour & Information Technology, 31(8), 753–755.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ973953&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The Internet and its increasing usage has changed informal learning in depth. This change has affected young and older adults in both the workplace and in higher education. But, in spite of this, formal and non-formal course-based approaches have not taken full advantage of these new informal learning scenarios and technologies. The Web 2.0 is a new way for people to communicate across the Internet. Communication is a means of transformation and knowledge exchange. These are the facts that cannot be obviated by the organisations in their training programmes and knowledge management. This special issue is devoted to investigating how informal learning changes or influences online information in Social Web and training strategies in institutions. In order to do so, five papers will present different approaches of informal learning in the workplace regarding Web 2.0 capabilities.

    1. Improving the way to Communicate Learning Activities to an Informal Learning Collector

      CASAÑ, M. J., HIERRO, N., GALANIS, N., MAYOL, E., & ALIER, M. (2015). Improving the way to Communicate Learning Activities to an Informal Learning Collector. International Journal of Engineering Education, 31(3), 874–883.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eue&AN=103081819&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Lifelong Learning has been a growing interest in e-learning research communities, in a similar way as other related kinds of learning (formal, non-formal and informal) already had. In fact, the Tagging Recognition and Acknowledgment of Informal Learning Experiences project proposes a framework to manage these types of learning, giving special attention to informal learning. This project gathers informal learning activities with an Informal Learning Collector. The main way for registering informal learning activities data into the Informal Learning Collector is using push mechanisms where the user explicitly introduces such information. In this paper, we present some evaluation of user opinions about this push communication mechanism, and propose an alternative way to communicate informal learning activities data, by using a pull mechanism. Using the pull mechanism, the Informal Learning Collector collects data directly from external applications. After the introduction of the pull mechanism, Informal Learning Collector users have confirmed that usability has been improved significantly.

    1. The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization.

      Amitabh, A., & Sinha, S. (2012). The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, 5(2), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.3991/ijac.v5i2.2111

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eue&AN=76422894&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Over the years, there has been a significant shift in the approach towards 'learning' in an organization. The focus of learning is no more limited to only the formal training mediums, such as classroom interventions and elearning programs. The shift in learning paradigm is more towards the creation of new learning solution that provides formal and informal learning, information and collaboration - thereby enabling the formation of a 'personal learning environment.' Now, there is a shift from 'content focus' to 'learner focus' education. This paper will suggest the appropriate use of technologies and processes to create a rich learning environment that includes a broad array of instructions, information resources, and collaborative solutions. The paper will also focus on the areas or situations where the new learning environment can be applied and the ways in which an organization can leverage the full range of its learning continuum.

      8/10

    1. America’s publicly funded adult education system serves only 5 percent of the 40 million U.S. adults who have low literacy skills.1 To stay competitive, adults need better access to education and training experiences that are high quality, afford­able, and adaptable. This includes math skills, which significantly affect employ­ability and career options.

      This article raises concerns with the workforce in America and how we are supporting adults who need access to a better education. With a better education adults can access higher paying jobs and contribute more. The article uses case studies and highlights to discuss different methods and best practice of adult learning.

    1. Workplace Learning in Informal Networks

      Milligan, C., Littlejohn, A., & Margaryan, A. (2014). Workplace Learning in Informal Networks. Journal of Interactive Media in Education.

      Learning does not stop when an individual leaves formal education, but becomes increasingly informal, and deeply embedded within other activities such as work. This article describes the challenges of informal learning in knowledge intensive industries, highlighting the important role of personal learning networks. The article argues that knowledge workers must be able to self-regulate their learning and outlines a range of behaviours that are essential to effective learning in informal networks. The article identifies tools that can support these behaviours in the workplace and how they might form a personal work and learning environment.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1034717&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      7/10

    1. The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization.

      Amitabh, A., & Sinha, S. (2012). The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, 5(2), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.3991/ijac.v5i2.2111

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eue&AN=76422894&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Over the years, there has been a significant shift in the approach towards 'learning' in an organization. The focus of learning is no more limited to only the formal training mediums, such as classroom interventions and elearning programs. The shift in learning paradigm is more towards the creation of new learning solution that provides formal and informal learning, information and collaboration - thereby enabling the formation of a 'personal learning environment.' Now, there is a shift from 'content focus' to 'learner focus' education. This paper will suggest the appropriate use of technologies and processes to create a rich learning environment that includes a broad array of instructions, information resources, and collaborative solutions. The paper will also focus on the areas or situations where the new learning environment can be applied and the ways in which an organization can leverage the full range of its learning continuum.

      7/10

    1. Scaling informal learning at the workplace: A model and four designs from a large-scale design-based research effort 

      Ley, T., Cook, J., Dennerlein, S., Kravcik, M., Kunzmann, C., Pata, K., Purma, J., Sandars, J., Santos, P., Schmidt, A., Al-Smadi, M., & Trattner, C. (2014). Scaling Informal Learning at the Workplace: A Model and Four Designs from a Large-Scale Design-Based Research Effort. British Journal of Educational Technology, 45(6), 1036–1048.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1043430&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Workplace learning happens in the process and context of work, is multi-episodic, often informal, problem based and takes place on a just-in-time basis. While this is a very effective means of delivery, it also does not scale very well beyond the immediate context. We review three types of technologies that have been suggested to scale learning and three connected theoretical discourses around learning and its support. Based on these three strands and an in-depth contextual inquiry into two workplace learning domains, health care and building and construction, four design-based research projects were conducted that have given rise to designs for scaling informal learning with technology. The insights gained from the design and contextual inquiry contributed to a model that provides an integrative view on three informal learning processes at work and how they can be supported with technology: (1) task performance, reflection and sensemaking; (2) help seeking, guidance and support; and (3) emergence and maturing of collective knowledge. The model fosters our understanding of how informal learning can be scaled and how an orchestrated set of technologies can support this process.

    1. Informal Learning in the Workplace: A Review of the Literature

      In the last few decades, the workplace has been increasingly recognised as a legitimate environment for learning new skills and knowledge, which in turn enables workers to participate more effectively in ever-changing work environments. Within the workplace, there is the potential for continuous learning to occur not only through formal learning initiatives that are associated with training, but also through informal learning opportunities that are embedded within everyday work activities. This paper surveys the growing body of literature on informal learning, makes some critical observations about the importance of informal learning, and explains the various ways that informal learning can occur in the workplace.

      https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ952000

    1. The adult learning environment

      This article was written by three faculty members of the University of Zambia. The authors discuss the idea of "adult learning" with respect to child learning. The authors spend most of the article outlining the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive aspects of the adult learning environment.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. The author, Stefan Hrastinski, is a Professor at the Division of Digital Learning and Director of Research Education at the Department of Learning in Engineering Sciences at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. Hrastinski notes the term "blended learning" originated in the 1990's, but is often over generalized. Hrastinski proposes several blended learning models, blended learning conceptualizations, and proposes recomendations for future research.

      Rating: 6/10