52 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2019
    1. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff

      This research article explores an andragogical method of learning for the in-service training of nurses. In a study of a training period for 35 nurses, research found an empowering model of education that was characterized by self-directed learning and practical learning. This model suggests active participation, motivation, and problem-solving as key indicators of effective training for nurses. Rating 8/10

    1. This article, developed by faculty members at NAU, provides research behind and practices for technology-infused professional development (PD) programs. The authors first emphasize the importance of designing professional development for teachers around how they and their students learn best. Many approaches to PD have taken a one-size-fits-all approach in which learners take a more passive role in absorbing standardized information. The authors in this article suggest the need for a more effective model, one in which teachers play an active role in learning in ways that they find most effective for them and their students. Technology can support this PD through interactive and learner-centered instruction. Rating: 9/10

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Using Technology to Help First-Gen Students

      This article highlights the need for and benefits of implementing more technology tools to support first-generation college students' learning, engagement, and success. For many first-gen students, especially those from low-income backgrounds, the transition to college can be challenging; this leads to lower retention rates, performance, and confidence. The authors, drawing off of research, suggest mobile devices and Web 2.0 technologies to prevent these challenges. Example of such tools include dictionary and annotation apps that are readily-accessible and aid in students' understanding of material. Fist-gen students can also use social media apps (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) to maintain supportive connections with family, peers, and mentors. Rating: 8/10

    1. We construct a graph from the unlabeled data to representthe underlying structure, such that each node represents adata point, and edges represent the inter-relationships be-tween them. Thereafter, considering the flow of beliefs in thisgraph, we choose those samples for labeling which minimizethe joint entropy of the nodes of the graph.

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  3. Sep 2019
    1. Think-pair-share

      They're used to death, but for good reason. There are few things better than a good TPS for getting students warmed up for discussion. One can even allow the TPS to inform the entire lesson: if the TPS results in a class-generated set of questions or learning objectives, teach from that, or plan to teach from it in the next class session.

  4. Jun 2019
    1. Balance exploration and exploitation: the choice of examples to label is seen as a dilemma between the exploration and the exploitation over the data space representation. This strategy manages this compromise by modelling the active learning problem as a contextual bandit problem. For example, Bouneffouf et al.[9] propose a sequential algorithm named Active Thompson Sampling (ATS), which, in each round, assigns a sampling distribution on the pool, samples one point from this distribution, and queries the oracle for this sample point label. Expected model change: label those points that would most change the current model. Expected error reduction: label those points that would most reduce the model's generalization error. Exponentiated Gradient Exploration for Active Learning:[10] In this paper, the author proposes a sequential algorithm named exponentiated gradient (EG)-active that can improve any active learning algorithm by an optimal random exploration. Membership Query Synthesis: This is where the learner generates its own instance from an underlying natural distribution. For example, if the dataset are pictures of humans and animals, the learner could send a clipped image of a leg to the teacher and query if this appendage belongs to an animal or human. This is particularly useful if your dataset is small.[11] Pool-Based Sampling: In this scenario, instances are drawn from the entire data pool and assigned an informative score, a measurement of how well the learner “understands” the data. The system then selects the most informative instances and queries the teacher for the labels. Stream-Based Selective Sampling: Here, each unlabeled data point is examined one at a time with the machine evaluating the informativeness of each item against its query parameters. The learner decides for itself whether to assign a label or query the teacher for each datapoint. Uncertainty sampling: label those points for which the current model is least certain as to what the correct output should be. Query by committee: a variety of models are trained on the current labeled data, and vote on the output for unlabeled data; label those points for which the "committee" disagrees the most Querying from diverse subspaces or partitions:[12] When the underlying model is a forest of trees, the leaf nodes might represent (overlapping) partitions of the original feature space. This offers the possibility of selecting instances from non-overlapping or minimally overlapping partitions for labeling. Variance reduction: label those points that would minimize output variance, which is one of the components of error. Conformal Predictors: This method predicts that a new data point will have a label similar to old data points in some specified way and degree of the similarity within the old examples is used to estimate the confidence in the prediction.[13]
  5. Mar 2019
    1. What Makes for Effective Adult Learning

      This article provides a short overview or strategies and techniques to make adult learning effective. This article quotes adult learning researches like Knowles to provide information about meaningful learning experiences. This article provides idea for activities that fit in the category of affective adult learning.

    1. Active learning approaches

      This website is a blog hosted on an official EU platform that discusses what quality learning environments look like for adults. This webpage reviews traditional learning approaches versus active learning approaches how they contribute to a quality learning environment. Rating: 6/10 for including an easy to read comparison table but lacking in discussion.

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Engaging  Adult  Learners

      This article discusses some attributes that are unique to adult learners, such as that their learning is selective, self-directed, and often focused on solving problems. Therefore, it is important that instructors enable students to be autonomous and show them why it is important. Often in my instructional design, I start with the WIIFM (What's In It For Me?). This article supports my idea that my adult learners will choose to learn when it can solve a problem for them. This article also discusses active learning from an adult perspective, such as Socratic teaching. 9/10

    1. What the Research Says About Teaching Adults

      Colorado Community Colleges published this article to discuss research about teaching adults, focusing strongly on Knowles's six principles of andragogy. The main idea behind Knowles's principles is that adults learn because they decided to--because the information is relevant to them and they can benefit from attaining that knowledge. Therefore, the article states, activities that ask adult learners to discuss problems with each other will help them learn. This can be useful as I design instruction. 7/10

    1. Cognitivism

      Cognitivism challenge behaviorism by positing that humans are more complex than simple lumps that respond to external stimuli. Cognitivism claims that people must involve themselves in their learning and take an active role. In short, when information enters the mind, it must be processed before it becomes a change in behavior. 6/10

  6. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. This page is associated with Thiagi's interactive lectures, which are characterized in a book that is available via this site. This particular page involves links to types of interaction, such as games, puzzles, and so forth. It would be better to read or review the book, but since that option is not available, I will provide a link here. rating 2/5

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

  7. Jan 2019
    1. Active-learning techniques — like sharing the responsibility for leading discussions or framing classroom expectations with our students — show them they indeed belong in this "scholarly space" and give them the confidence to engage with the course and one another.

      The ProfHacker article by Maha Bali and Steve Greenlaw explores this more concretely. Active learning for inclusion needs to be scaffolded in such a way that it does not reinforce the privilege of dominant cultures and personalities.

  8. Dec 2018
    1. Are All Training Examples Created Equal? An Empirical Study

      从此paper了解到了叫 Active learning 的有趣概念,这似乎和自己设计的连续参数训练数据采样池很接近。。。。

      这篇文章的主要工作是给出了一个在图像分类中关于训练样本重要性的研究,对于样本的重要度采用基于梯度的方法进行度量。文章的结论可能表明在深度学习中主动学习或许并不总是有效的。

  9. Nov 2018
    1. a decline in public sentiment for the sage on the stage figure,

      Do active learning pedagogical approaches contribute to this decline in interest/legitimacy?

    1. Yammer is Web 2.0 software which integrates with Microsoft 360 and allows users to communicate together and across the organization. It essentially functions as social networking software for corporations with the ability to collaborate on projects, maintain task lists, store files, documents and pictures all within a private enterprise network. In addition Yammer allows for the sharing of feedback and the management of group projects. Yammer is freemium software with a variety of custom add-ons. Licenses are currently issued for all learner participants and at this time no custom add-ons are necessary.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  10. Jul 2018
  11. Jun 2018
  12. d32ogoqmya1dw8.cloudfront.net d32ogoqmya1dw8.cloudfront.net
    1. he polling was nearly unani-mous that acquiring informationwas the easiest to do alone and thatthe other two goals seemed morecomplicated and would profit frompeer and instructor influence. This,then, led to a discussion of how topursue goals 2 and 3. These goalsare not achieved by reading orlistening to a lecturer—studentsmust actively do things in order tolearn. Students learn best (Davis,1993) when they take an active role:• When they discuss what theyare reading• When they practice what theyare learning• When they apply practices andideas
  13. Jan 2018
    1. Faculty development.

      Physical spaces for technology-based learning do not have to be student-only spaces, and actually giving faculty the choice to use these spaces as well may keep the curriculum fresh, the faculty updated on what works best for the students and students interested and feeling like their learning needs and styles are being met.

    2. it also required elusive buy-in from administrators and a new approach to thinking about the classroom experience.

      There are benefits and drawbacks to such modern learning spaces. On one hand, the space(s) being used for technological advancement need to be designated, built/remodeled and shown to be used regularly by students, this process takes a long time and a lot of funding to perfect, which is what administration do not want to hear. Such spaces do not have to be used only for online courses and studying, which is a point made later in this article, it can be versatile and useful for all students if designed right. As technology improves, educators with more training in technology are becoming more widespread and students utilize online resources and technology more, the necessity of having these spaces increases.

    3. active learning and technology engagement.
  14. Aug 2017
    1. The embedding of maker culture in K–12 education has made students active contributors to the knowledge ecosystem rather than merely participants and consumers of knowledge.

      How does this get balanced with privacy concerns? I have yet to see an argument or practice that successfully navigates this tension?

  15. May 2017
    1. TPS Reflective Exercises

      TPS as metacognition - worth trying out. Would have to budget time for it. Could we combine it with something to capture data? connect to qualtrics or google forms

  16. Mar 2017
    1. trying to answer questions—or to even foster questions in the first place

      This strikes me as a crucial point: using this tool allowed you to shift from a traditional, considerably passive learning style (they're still engaging with the text, but alone) to a more potentially active one.

  17. Feb 2017
  18. Jul 2016
    1. Large lecture classes may go through the content too quickly for the typical student to understand. That's why so many schools follow the practice of breaking the class cohort into smaller sections led by teaching assistants.
  19. May 2016
    1. “learners must be actively engaged in learning” to achieve deep understanding (Barkley, Cross, & Major, 2005, p. 10).

      This might be a useful reference for further study into active learning

  20. Mar 2016
    1. Many times, the work we do as educators is actually taking away some of the most powerful learning from our students.
  21. Jan 2016
    1. Apprendre à programmer permet aux enfants un nouveau rapport aux technologies: de consommateur interactif de manuels scolaires numérisés à la capacité de créer des ressources éducatives numériques et même des mini-jeux.
  22. Dec 2015
  23. Nov 2015
  24. Oct 2015
    1. follow the lead of the sciences

      Again, I don't get all the anti-science rhetoric and anti-intellectualism when it comes to talking about teaching. Was active learning invented in science classes? No. Was John Dewey a scientist? No. Either way, does any of that mean that we should reject something because it was done in the sciences or said by a scientist?

      There are whole journals devoted to research on teaching humanities topics: history, philosophy, writing, literature, etc. All ignored in this article.

    2. Eliot was a chemist, so perhaps we should take his criticisms with a grain of salt.

      Again, there is plenty of research showing that active learning is better in areas other than the sciences and math. See the section on History education in the free book How Students Learn, for example: http://www.nap.edu/read/10126/chapter/3

      or the book Doing History, or work by Sam Wineburg and other history education researchers.

    3. vogue

      I wouldnt't call it a "craze" or a "vogue" when people have been arguing for it for over 100 years and there are now thousands of empirical research articles demonstrating that it is superior to traditional lecture. Rejecting active learning in favor of traditional lecture is akin to the 19th doctors who rejected the idea that they needed to wash their hands: https://edtechdev.wordpress.com/2014/06/03/healthcare/

    4. 2014 study showed that test scores in science and math courses improved after professors replaced lecture time with “active learning” methods like group work

      It's not just math and science. There are studies showing active learning is better than lecture for history teaching and other areas, too. Here's just one: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:IHIE.0000047415.48495.05#page-1