714 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Adler, Mortimer J. “How to Mark a Book.” Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1940.

      See also: https://hypothes.is/a/WZWWgnV2EeyFFBshJKbM4A

    2. It's like re-suming an interrupted conversationwith the advantage of being able topick up where you left off.And that is exactly what readinga book should be: a conversation be-tween you and the author.
    3. Full owner-ship comes only when you have madeit a part of yourself, and the best wayto make yourself a part of it is bywriting in it.

      ownership [of a book]

  2. Feb 2024
    1. ‘Blessed Lord, which hast caused al holy Scriptures to bee written forour learnyng; graunte us that we maye in such wise heare them,read, marke, learne, and inwardly digeste them.’2

      quote from:<br /> The Booke of the Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments (London: 1549), sig. B iiv.

    1. Page Notes

      I now know what page notes are. They are annotations without selecting any texts. However, I do not know how to use page notes effectively, or when to use page notes, for me or for my students.

    2. Highlights

      I have known about highlights in Hypothesis.is. Highlights are only visible to myself, but not to others.

      However, I have thought about how to use highlights as my own tips for students. Use highlights first while you are reading the article. Highlight potential texts first for later annotation! That way, there is no need to read the article one more time.

    1. American contributors were underlined in red in Murray’saddress books.
    2. Volunteers like Taylor who could fill gaps in quotations and search outdesiderata were invaluable to Murray. They were marked in the addressbooks by numbered D’s when desiderata lists had been sent to them, and by asmall Star of David sign when a third list had been sent.
  3. Jan 2024
    1. My guess is that it was unintentional and the result of sloppy note-taking practices that did not clearly mark original and borrowed ideas.

      Jillian Hess' guess for the origin of King's plagiarism.

      It's also possible that he came from a much more oral facing cultural upbringing rather than a dyed-in-the-wool academic one which focused on attribution.

    1. Mosaic was the first browser to explore the concept of collaborative annotation in 1993[2

      her is some evidence that I am being honest

    1. You should read with a pen in your hand andenter...short hints of what you feel...may be useful; forthis be the best method of imprinting [them] in yourmemory. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

      original source?

      it's Benjamin Franklin letter to Miss Stevenson, Wanstead. Craven-street, May 16, 1760.<br /> see: https://hyp.is/HZeDKI3YEeyj9GcNWKX4iA/www.gutenberg.org/files/40236/40236-h/40236-h.htm

  4. Dec 2023
  5. mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu
    1. printed page of the Talmud as a document.

      https://mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu/pub/syyor4ra/release/1?readingCollection=31668090

      From Chapter 3 of Remi Kalir and Antero Garcia's book Annotation.

      I've referenced this image so many times, I ought to finally bookmark it, right?

      Ted Nelson shows a similar one when talking about Project Xanadu and the importance of parallel texts.

    1. A GNU Emacs major mode for convenient plain text markup — and much more. Org mode is for keeping notes, maintaining to-do lists, planning projects, authoring documents, computational notebooks, literate programming and more — in a fast and effective plain text system.

      A note taking tool discussed by [[Bastien Guerry]] at I Annotate 2021.

  6. Nov 2023
    1. “You don't read without marking;” it said, “you can't mark without reading.”

      “You don't read without marking; you can't mark without reading.” —Kori Stamper

    1. Thanks to a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (2008), the collection is cataloged and stabilized. We are now working to digitize all volumes containing marginalia, a project that is freely shared with the international scholarly community in order to expand the rich contemporary dialogue on Arendt’s significant contribution to public discourse.
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/17pitv9/when_does_annotating_books_become_a_distraction/

      This entire thread is a fascinating sample look at the state of annotation with respect to reading practices.

    2. UnmutualOne · 3 days agoAnnotations are my map back into the book.
    3. When does annotating books become a distraction? .t3_17pitv9._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #8c8c8c; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #8c8c8c; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      reply to u/Low-Appointment-2906 at https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/17pitv9/when_does_annotating_books_become_a_distraction/

      Through the middle ages, bookmakers would not only leave significant margins for readers to annotate, but they also illuminated books and included drolleries which readers in the know would use in conjunction with the arts of memory (from rhetoric) to memorize portions of texts more easily. I strongly suspect this isn't what booktokkers are doing; their practice is likely more like the sorts of decorative #ProductivityPorn one sees in the Bullet journal and journaling spaces. It's performative content creation.

      Those interested in refining their practices of "reading with a pen in hand", continuing the "great conversation" or having "conversations with their texts" might profitably start with Mortimer J. Adler's essay: “How to Mark a Book” (Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1941). In his 1975 KCET series How to Read a Book, which was based on their book of the same name, Adler mentioned to Charles Van Doren that he would buy new copies of books so he could re-annotate them without being distracted by his older annotations.

      Some have solved the problem of distracting annotations by interleaving their books so they've got lots of blank space to write their notes. It's a rarer practice now, but some publishers still print Bibles with blank pages every other page for this practice. Others put their annotations and notes into commonplace books or on index cards for their card index/zettelkasten.

      As some have mentioned, friends and lovers through time have shared books with annotations as a way of sharing their thoughts. George Custer and his wife Elizabeth did this with Tennyson.

      If you're interested in annotating digitally online, perhaps check out Hypothes.is where I've seen teachers and students using social annotation to read and make sense of books [example]. I've also seen groups of people use this tool for hosting online book groups/clubs.

      If you're in it for fun, you might appreciate:

      And those wishing to delve more deeply into the history and power of annotation might look at: Kalir, Remi H., and Antero Garcia. Annotation. The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series. MIT Press, 2019. https://mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu/annotation.

      Good luck annotating! 📝

    1. Studs Terkel, the oral historian, was known to admonish friends who would read his books but leave them free of markings. He told them that reading a book should not be a passive exercise, but rather a raucous conversation.

      love "raucous conversation"!

    2. The collection at the Newberry includes a bound copy of “The Federalist” once owned by Thomas Jefferson. Besides penciling his initials in the book, Jefferson wrote those of the founding fathers alongside their essays, which had originally been published anonymously.

      Thomas Jefferson wrote the names of the previously anonymous authors of The Federalist next to their essays in his personal copy.

  7. Oct 2023
    1. Possible further answers to your open questions are in »›Schmierbuchmethode bestens zu empfehlen.‹ Sudelbücher?«, in: Ulrich Joost et al. (eds.), Georg Christoph Lichtenberg 1742–1799. Wagnis der Aufklärung, München 1992, 19–48. PDF in GermanThere’s plenty more at the Lichtenberg society.And a fascinating online exhibition. See display no. 20 for an example of one of Lichtenberg’s annotated bibliographies, which he had published specially in an interleaved edition, and, wouldn’t you know it, some of his loose slips!
    1. https://chantalmb.github.io/MRE-MitM-2023/

      Found via Shawn Graham @electricarchaeo@scholar.social

      Folks, I am so pleased to share that Chantal Brousseau has won the University Medal for Outstanding Graduate Work at the Master's Level for her major research project 'Metadata in the Margins - Reshaping Archives as Data through Early Modern Marginalia' > https://chantalmb.github.io/MRE-MitM-2023/

      Just a tremendous person to work with; I've been lucky to work with her. So pleased! #histodons #dh https://hcommons.social/@electricarchaeo@scholar.social/111292052630790110

      cc: remikalir

    1. What is it with index cards ? .t3_17ck5la._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; } So I posted a while ago about my journey into the zettlekasten and I have to admit I still enjoy using this system for notes.I must say, I am an avid note taker for a long time. I write ideas, notes from books, novels, poems and so much more. I mainly used to use notebooks, struggle a while with note taking apps and now I mainly use two kind of things : index cards (A6) and an e-ink tablet (the supernote) for different purpose of course, the index cards for the zettelkasten and the e-ink tablet for organization and my work. To be honest I used to consider myself more a notebooks kind of person than an index cards one (and I am from France we don't use index cards but "fiche bristol" which are bigger than A6 notecards, closer to an A5 format)Still, there is something about index cards, I cannot tell what it is, but it feels something else to write on this, like my mind is at ease and I could write about ideas, life and so many stuff covering dozens of cards. I realize that after not touching my zettelkasten for a few week (lack of time) and coming back to it. It feels so much easier to write on notecards than on notebooks (or any other place) and I can't explain it.Anyone feeling the same thing ?

      reply to u/Sensitive-Binding at https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/17ck5la/what_is_it_with_index_cards/

      Some of it may involve the difference in available space versus other forms of writing on larger pages of paper. Similarly, many find that there is less pressure to write something short on Twitter or similar social media platforms because there is less space in the user interface that your mind feels the need to fill up. One can become paralyzed by looking at the larger open space on a platform like WordPress with the need to feel like they should write more.

      With index cards you fill one up easily enough, and if there's more, you just grab another card and repeat.


      cross reference with Fermat's Last Theorem being easier to suggest in a margin than actually writing it out in full.

    1. “Annotating Austen” is an ongoing digital humanities project that aims to create multi-media annotated electronic editions of Jane Austen’s six published novels. The project engages undergraduate students in researching and writing scholarly explanatory annotations using the web annotation tool Hypothesis (www.hypothes.is).
    1. In these instances, he could outsource partsof the work process to his personal amanuenses, his youngest children,Martha and Friedrich, who acted as scribes and copied book passagesthat he had marked.

      Many writers and excerpters had amanuenses as helpers to copy out passages or to copy material over for them. Theodor Fontane would mark passages in books for his children to excerpt and copy over for him.

      Compare this manual labor to that of more modern tools like Hypothes.is which allow one to digitally highlight and then excerpt almost automatically.

  8. Sep 2023
    1. Undocumented Hypothes.is Badge API (used by Chrome extension):

      ```python """ Return the number of public annotations on a given page.

      This is for the number that's displayed on the Chrome extension's badge.

      Certain pages are blocklisted so that the badge never shows a number on those pages. The Chrome extension is oblivious to this, we just tell it that there are 0 annotations. """ ```

      https://hypothes.is/api/badge?uri=* same as https://hypothes.is/api/search?limit=0&uri=*.

    1. Watch the scale and scope of what you're doing. If you read a book and make a hundred highlights and small notes, DO NOT attempt to turn all of these into permanent notes. You might fell like that is the thing to do, but resist it. A large portion are small things or potentially useful facts that you'll likely never use again or would easily remember, particularly once you've read a whole book.

      Find the much smaller subset (5-10% or less of the overall total of notes and highlights as a ballpark rule of thumb) of the most interesting and potentially long term useful ones, and turn those into your permanent notes. Anything beyond this is sure to cause overwhelm. Also don't think that your permanent notes need to be spectacular, awesome, or even bordering on "perfect". They just need to be useful enough for you.

      If you own the books or keep your brief notes and highlights written down and need them in the future, you'll still have those to search/find and do something with later as a backstop just in case.

    1. Underlines and margin notes in an unknown hand are interspersed throughout the texts. Volume I includes a daily devotional page that has been used as a bookmark. The back endpapers of Volume IV has been copiously annotated.

      Jack Kerouac followed the general advice of Mortimer J. Adler to write notes into the endpapers of his books as evidenced by the endpapers of Volume IV of the 7th Year Course of The Great Books Foundation series with which Adler was closely associated.

    1. Add a new, undocumented separate_replies=True option to the search API. If separate_replies=True option is _not_ given to the search API, then it reverts to its previous behaviour: _do_ include replies in the "rows" list returned. This is the same behaviour that the search API had befor: it returns both top-level annotations and replies in the one "rows" list, but without any guarantee that if some annotations/replies from a given thread are in the list then all annotations/replies from that thread will be in it. If separate_replies=True _is_ given then the API follows the new behaviour: "rows" contains top-level annotations only, and a separate "replies" list containing all replies to the annotations in rows is also inserted into the result.
  9. Aug 2023
    1. Texts are patient conversationalists always waiting for you to write your side of the conversation into the margin before they continue on with their side of the conversation. Sadly, too many readers (students especially) don't realize that there's a conversation going on.

      Link to:<br /> - https://hypothes.is/a/bBwyhkN3Ee6nQNPI5xmSnQ - https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q

    2. Margins in books and on paper are blank spaces for "dark ideas" asking to be filled in while "reading with a pen in hand" so that the reader can have a conversation with the text.

      Link to https://hypothes.is/a/GvRApkN3Ee6LbBPqqX-A5Q on dark ideas

    3. Indigenous cultures can "see" dark constellations (example: the Australian emu in the sky) which are defined empty spaces which are explicitly visible.

      Using this concept, one could think of or use blank index cards in a zettelkasten or even the empty (negative) spaces between cards as "dark ideas" (potential ideas which need to be thought of and filled in).

      Link to: https://hypothes.is/a/FlqusEN1Ee6XEr_9StPUlA

    1. Now, award-winning poet Nicole Sealey revisits the investigation in a book that redacts the report, an act of erasure that reimagines the original text as it strips it away. While the full document is visible in the background—weighing heavily on the language Sealey has preserved—it gives shape and disturbing context to what remains.
  10. Jul 2023
    1. Except for beautifully printed or rarely found books, I read almost everything with a pencil in my hand. I mark favorite passages, scribble notes in margins, sometimes even make shopping lists on the end papers.
    1. CPB vs Reading Notes .t3_14li1ri._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; } Does anyone separate their reading notes from their common place Notebook? I’ve always used a notebook to combine my Bullet Journal, reading notes, and Common Place. It’s been a mesh of words and I’ve been ok w that, but I just got the Remarkable 2 and I’m trying to figure out how to set it up. Any ideas?

      reply to u/Nil205 at https://www.reddit.com/r/commonplacebook/comments/14li1ri/cpb_vs_reading_notes/

      I have a similar and differently formed, but still simple system compared to most here. Rather than a traditional commonplace book, I keep all my notes on index cards. I keep all my reading notes for a particular book on a series of index cards that I staple together with a citation card for the book and then file them by author and title.

      When I'm done, I'll excerpt the most important parts each individual note (highlight/annotation) and expand on them on its own index card which I file away and index. In your case you might equivalently have a reading notebook where you might keep a section of notes as you read a book and then excerpt the most important or salient parts into your main commonplace. Some may prefer, especially if they own the book in question, to annotate (put their reading notes into) the book directly and then excerpt either as they go or at the end when they're done and can frame their ideas with a broader knowledge of the area in question. Sometimes at later dates you may realize you read something useful which you don't find in your commonplace book, but you can find the gist of it in your reading notes which you can reference, refresh your memory, and then excerpt into your commonplace.

      For more on my sort of card index or zettelkasten (German: slip box) practice you might take a look at one or more of the following which explain the broad generalities:

      If it's useful/inspiring as an example, Ross Ashby had a lifelong series of notebooks, much like a commonplace, and a separate card index where he cross-indexed all of his ideas to make them more easily searchable, findable, and cross referenceable. You can see digitized versions of the journals and index online which you can explore at http://www.rossashby.info/journal/index.html.

  11. Jun 2023
    1. How Harriet Tubman is remembered and honored

      I want this Harriet Tubman stamp more than I'd like the $5 Bill Murray version... at least until the new $20 is released.

      https://hypothes.is/a/QdWnFgfoEe6tBl834HpIcA

    1. I would advise you to read with a pen in your hand, and enter in a little book short hints of what you find that is curious or that may be useful; for this will be the best method of imprinting such particulars in your memory, where they will be ready either for practice on some future occasion if they are matters of utility, or at least to adorn and improve your conversation if they are rather points of curiosity.

      Benjamin Franklin letter to Miss Stevenson, Wanstead. Craven-street, May 16, 1760.

      Franklin doesn't use the word commonplace book here, but is actively recommending the creation and use of one. He's also encouraging the practice of annotation, though in commonplace form rather than within the book itself.

  12. May 2023
    1. Johnson, Dirk. “Book Lovers Fear Dim Future for Notes in the Margins.” The New York Times, February 21, 2011, sec. Books. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/21/books/21margin.html.

      suggested by The Margins of Marginalia by Tom Peters, ALA TechSource on 2011-05-02

    2. Not everyone values marginalia, said Paul Ruxin, a member of the Caxton Club. “If you think about the traditional view that the book is only about the text,” he said, “then this is kind of foolish, I suppose.”

      A book can't only be about the text, it has to be about the reader's interaction with it and thoughts about it. Without these, the object has no value.

      Annotations are the traces left behind of how one valued a book as they read and interacted with it.

    3. In the 20th century it mostly came to be regarded like graffiti: something polite and respectful people did not do.AdvertisementContinue reading the main storyPaul F. Gehl, a curator at the Newberry, blamed generations of librarians and teachers for “inflicting us with the idea” that writing in books makes them “spoiled or damaged.”
    4. association copies — books once owned or annotated by the authors

      An association copy is a copy of a book which belonged to the author or someone connected to them or a copy of a book that once belonged to someone particularly associated with its contents, often annotated.


      I've got association copies of some information theory texts...

    1. The Margins of Marginalia by Tom Peters, ALA TechSource on 2011-05-02

      Peters talks about his own reading practices and his annotation habits throughout his life. There's some discussion of the oncoming annotation functionality in the digital space in 2011.

    2. the Openmargin iPad app announced in late April (http://www.the- digital-reader.com/2011/04/28/openmargin-brings-margin-notes-to-life/) looks very interesting.
    3. The Readum app (readum.com) does something similar (Google Book to Facebook).

      readum.com no longer resolves in 2023. It was apparently a annotation tool in 2011...

    4. It became extremely easy to highlight passages and add notes, which are then situated in the text I'm reading but also pulled together into my Kindle account on Amazon where I can, for instance, share them with students in a course, fellow members of a book discussion group, family, and friends…even, in theory, with enemies.  I’ll rebut and rebuke them with my rapier marginalia.

      this last bit is poetry of a fascinating sort...

    5. Coleridge, Melville, Twain, David Foster Wallace, and a host of others made marginalia into a form of literary expression.

      Marginalia is a form of literary expression.

  13. Apr 2023
    1. Oakeshott saw educationas part of the ‘conversation of mankind’, wherein teachers induct their studentsinto that conversation by teaching them how to participate in the dialogue—howto hear the ‘voices’ of previous generations while cultivating their own uniquevoices.

      How did Michael Oakeshott's philosophy overlap with the idea of the 'Great Conversation' or 20th century movement of Adler's Great Books of the Western World.

      How does it influence the idea of "having conversations with the text" in the annotation space?

  14. Mar 2023
    1. TheSateliteCombinationCard IndexCabinetandTelephoneStand

      A fascinating combination of office furniture types in 1906!

      The Adjustable Table Company of Grand Rapids, Michigan manufactured a combination table for both telephones and index cards. It was designed as an accessory to be stood next to one's desk to accommodate a telephone at the beginning of the telephone era and also served as storage for one's card index.

      Given the broad business-based use of the card index at the time and the newness of the telephone, this piece of furniture likely was not designed as an early proto-rolodex, though it certainly could have been (and very well may have likely been) used as such in practice.


      I totally want one of these as a side table for my couch/reading chair for both storing index cards and as a temporary writing surface while reading!


      This could also be an early precursor to Twitter!

      Folks have certainly mentioned other incarnations: - annotations in books (person to self), - postcards (person to person), - the telegraph (person to person and possibly to others by personal communication or newspaper distribution)

      but this is the first version of short note user interface for both creation, storage, and distribution by means of electrical transmission (via telephone) with a bigger network (still person to person, but with potential for easy/cheap distribution to more than a single person)

  15. Feb 2023
    1. Despite the crudeness of his experimental setup 500 years ago, da Vinci, Dr. Gharib said, was able to calculate the gravitational constant to an accuracy within 10 percent of the modern value.

      Nearly a hundred years before Galileo and two hundred years before Newton, in a series of diagrams and notes in the Codex Arundel, Da Viinci was able to calculate the gravitational constant to an accuracy within 10 percent of the accepted value.

    1. reply https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/comment/16622/#Comment_16622

      Adler has an excellent primer on this subject that covers a lot of the basics in reasonable depth: - Adler, Mortimer J. “How to Mark a Book.” Saturday Review of Literature, July 6, 1940. (https://stevenson.ucsc.edu/academics/stevenson-college-core-courses/how-to-mark-a-book-1.pdf)

      Marking books can be useful not only to the original reader, but future academics and historians studying material culture (eg: https://apps.lib.umich.edu/online-exhibits/exhibits/show/marks-in-books), and as @GeoEng51 indicates they might be shared by friends, family, romantic interests, or even perhaps all of the above (see: https://newcriterion.com/issues/2017/4/mrs-custers-tennyson).

      For those interested in annotation marks and symbols (like @ctietze's "bolt" ↯) I outlined a few ideas this last month at: https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/10qw4l5/comment/j6vxn6a/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

    1. https://www.srf.ch/kultur/gesellschaft-religion/brisanter-fund-geheime-gaestekartei-ueberlebt-hotelbrand-und-birgt-zuendstoff

      cc: @remikalir: Interesting example here of a historical collection of business files annotated by hotel staff used in a digital humanities perspective for semantic shift and tracking antisemitism over time.

      Published book:<br /> Hechenblaikner, Lois, Andrea Kühbacher, and Rolf Zollinger. Keine Ostergrüsse mehr!: Die geheime Gästekartei des Grand Hotel Waldhaus in Vulpera. 3rd ed. Zürich: Edition Patrick Frey, 2021.

    2. Wie durch ein Wunder blieben vier Holzkisten mit hochbrisantem Inhalt verschont. Sie waren zum Zeitpunkt des Infernos in einem anderen Gebäude eingelagert. Sie enthielten 20'000 Gästekarten, die Concierges und Rezeptionisten zwischen 1920 und 1960 heimlich geführt hatten.

      srf.ch/kultur/gesellschaft-religion/brisanter-fund-geheime-gaestekartei-ueberlebt-hotelbrand-und-birgt-zuendstoff

      Google translate:

      four wooden boxes with highly explosive contents were spared. They were stored in a different building at the time of the inferno. They contained 20,000 guest cards that concierges and receptionists had kept secretly between 1920 and 1960.

      The Grandhotel Waldhaus burned down in 1989, but saved from the inferno were 20,000 guest cards with annotations about them that were compiled between 1920 and 1960.

  16. Jan 2023
    1. The myth of technology is

      The myth of technology - is - the myth that the software issues are technical; - whereas what matters is - communicating to the mind and heart of the user, - and that is not a technical issue at all.

      do how : annotations & TrailMarks - instead of tags - compose Clues

      compose : Clue - Clue consist of two parts a Clue Term and - an Outline - (possibly nested) ordered list of items - where items can be text images html fragment or nested clues

    1. Annotating an in-text reference pointer with a citation function

      ```turtle @prefix : http://www.sparontologies.net/example/ . @prefix cito: http://purl.org/spar/cito/ . @prefix c4o: http://purl.org/spar/c4o/ . @prefix oa: http://www.w3.org/ns/oa# . @prefix per: http://data.semanticweb.org/person/ .

      :annotation a oa:Annotation ; oa:hasBody :citation ; oa:hasTarget :in-text-ref-pointer ; oa:annotatedBy per:silvio-peroni .

      :citation a cito:Citation; cito:hasCitingEntity :paper-a ; cito:hasCitationEvent cito:extends ; cito:hasCitedEntity :paper-b .

      :in-text-ref-pointer a c4o:InTextReferencePointer ; c4o:hasContent "[6]" . ```

    2. Annotating a citation with an additional text-defined citation function

      ```turtle @prefix : http://www.sparontologies.net/example/ . @prefix cito: http://purl.org/spar/cito . @prefix cnt: http://www.w3.org/2011/content# . @prefix oa: http://www.w3.org/ns/oa# .

      :annotation a oa:Annotation; oa:motivatedBy oa:commenting ; oa:hasBody :comment ; oa:hasTarget :citation .

      :comment a cnt:ContentAsText ; cnt:chars "I'm citing that paper because it initiated this whole new field of research." .

      :citation a cito:Citation; cito:hasCitingEntity :paper-a ; cito:hasCitationCharacterization cito:cites ; cito:hasCitedEntity :paper-b . ```

    1. It’s far more complicated than that, obviously. Different parts of this process are going on all the time. While working on one chapter, I’m also capturing and working on unrelated—for the time being at least—notes on other topics that interest me, including stuff that might well end up in future books.

      Because reading, annotating/note taking, and occasional outlining and writing can be broken down into small, concrete building blocks, each part of the process can be done separately and discretely with relatively easy ability to shift from one part of the process to another.

      Importantly, one can be working on multiple different high level projects (content production: writing, audio, video, etc.) simultaneously in a way which doesn't break the flow of one's immediate reading. While a particular note within a piece may not come to fruition within a current imagined project, it may spark an idea for a future as yet unimagined project.


      Aside: It would seem that Ryan Holiday's descriptions of his process are discrete with respect to each individual project. He's never mentioned using or reusing notes from past projects for current or future projects. He's even gone to the level that he creates custom note cards for his current project which have a title pre-printed on them.

      Does this pre-titling help to provide him with more singular focus for his specific workflow? Some who may be prone to being side-tracked or with specific ADHD issues may need or be helped by these visual and workflow cues to stay on task, and as a result be helped by them. For others it may hinder their workflows and creativity.

      This process may be different for beginning students or single project writers versus career writers (academics, journalists, fiction and non-fiction writers).


      As a concrete example of the above, I personally made a note here about Darwin and Lamarck for a separate interest in evolution which falls outside of my immediate area of interest with respect to note taking and writing output.

    1. 1.This class is intended to help you advance and afterward apply reasonable as well as hypothetical data as it connects with the social brain research of game and exercise science. A portion of the areas connected with this class incorporate character, inspiration, excitement, objective setting, initiative, symbolism, collective vibes, social impact, social examination, and correspondence.

      1. "Coach" Pick a previous or current mentor and survey from that individual data about their training, educator, & instructor reasoning essential. Being involved in different circumstances that have molded that person way of thinking. Being able to manage as well as things they oversee inside their groups, procedures they use to get competitors arranged for rivalry, and a reflection on how things have changed throughout the long term.
      1. This course is online so this would roughly take 2 to 3 hours a day to do good.
    2. 4.Late work is not accepted and you will not be allowed to post anything on canvas.

    1. An excellent way tomake the important points stand out is to read the entire set of notes verycarefully, underlining the more vital points in red ink. Such a method willmake them stand out from the rest and give the eye a scale of values moreeasily remembered.

      The suggestion of visual highlighting making ideas stand out, but without the idea of their location within the notes being a helpful part of the mnemonic technique.

    1. https://omnivore.app/<br /> Open source version of readwise

      Originally bookmarked from phone on Sun 2023-01-15 11:25 PM

      updated: 2023-01-17 with tag: "accounts"

    1. Example 2 HTTP/1.1 200 OK Content-Type: application/ld+json; profile="http://www.w3.org/ns/anno.jsonld" Link: <http://www.w3.org/ns/ldp#Resource>; rel="type" ETag: "_87e52ce126126" Allow: PUT,GET,OPTIONS,HEAD,DELETE,PATCH Vary: Accept Content-Length: 287 { "@context": "http://www.w3.org/ns/anno.jsonld", "id": "http://example.org/annotations/anno1", "type": "Annotation", "created": "2015-01-31T12:03:45Z", "body": { "type": "TextualBody", "value": "I like this page!" }, "target": "http://www.example.com/index.html" }
    1. First, I mixed the conversational notes in with my other thoughts. But I’ve since found that keeping the conversational notes separate from other notes is better—it creates a stronger sense of place. Now, I enter the Torbjörn notes, and all past conversations flow up. Mixed in with the other notes, they were diluted.

      Like the affordances with respect to memory, giving notes a "place" can give them additional power.

  17. Dec 2022