8 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2020
    1. Finally, you gain the ability to reuse previously built packets for new projects. Maybe some research you did for an online marketing campaign becomes useful for a new campaign. Or some sketches that didn’t quite make it into an old design give you inspiration for a new one. Or some book notes you wrote down casually turn out to be very useful for an unforeseen challenge a year later.

      The Intermediate Packet approach allows you to reuse previously built packets for new projects

      By incorporating existing packets in new projects, you gain the ability to deliver new projects much faster.

    2. Fourth, big projects become less intimidating. Big, ambitious projects feel risky, because all the time you spend on it will feel like a waste if you don’t succeed. But if your only goal is to create an intermediate packet and show it to someone — good notes on a book, a Pinterest board of design inspirations, just one module of code — then you can trick yourself into getting started. And even if that particular Big Project doesn’t pan out, you’ll still have the value of the packets at your disposal!

      The Intermediate Packet approach make big projects less intimidating.

      Big projects feel risky because the time you spend on it feels like a waste if you don't succeed. Intermediate Packets allow you to finish smaller chunks. You can use this to trick yourself to get started on bigger things.

    3. By always having a range of packets ready to work on, each one pre-prepared to work on at any time, you can be productive under any circumstances – waiting in the airport before a flight, the doctor’s waiting room, 15 minutes in between meetings.

      If you have a range of packet sizes available to work on, you can use any time block size to deliver value.

    4. Third, you can create value in any span of time. If we see our work as creating these intermediate packets, we can find ways to create value in any span of time, no matter how short. Productivity becomes a game of matching each available block of time (or state of mind, or mood, or energy level) with a corresponding packet that is perfectly suited to it.

      The Intermediate Packet approach ensures you are delivering value after every iteration, regardless of size

      You no longer need to rely on large blocks on uninterrupted time if you focus on delivering something of value at the end of each block of time.

    5. Second, you have more frequent opportunities to get feedback. Instead of spending weeks hammering away in isolation, only to discover that you made some mistaken assumptions, you can get feedback at each intermediate stage. You become more adaptable and more accountable, because you are performing your work in public.

      Intermediate Packets give you more opportunities to get feedback

    6. The first benefit of working this way is that you become interruption-proof. Because you rarely even attempt to load the entire project into your mind all at once, there’s not much to “unload” if someone interrupts you. It’s much easier to pick up where you left off, because you’re not trying to juggle all the work-in-process in your head.

      The intermittent packet approach makes you more resilient towards interruptions

      Because you're not loading an entire project in your mind at once, you're not losing as much context when you get interrupted.

    1. Bringing this back to filtering, not only am I saving time and preserving focus by batch processing both the collection and the consumption of new content, I’m time-shifting the curation process to a time better suited for reading, and (most critically) removed from the temptations, stresses, and biopsychosocial hooks that first lured me in.I am always amazed by what happens: no matter how stringent I was in the original collecting, no matter how certain I was that this thing was worthwhile, I regularly eliminate 1/3 of my list before reading. The post that looked SO INTERESTING when compared to that one task I’d been procrastinating on, in retrospect isn’t even something I care about.What I’m essentially doing is creating a buffer. Instead of pushing a new piece of info through from intake to processing to consumption without any scrutiny, I’m creating a pool of options drawn from a longer time period, which allows me to make decisions from a higher perspective, where those decisions are much better aligned with what truly matters to me.

      Using read-it later apps helps you separate collection from filtering.

      By time-shifting the filtering process to a time better suited for reading, and removed from temptations, you will want to drop 2/3 of the content you save.

      This allows you to "make decisions from a higher perspective"

    1. There are different schools of thought in the realm of productivity.

      The energy school focuses on optimizing your energy levels. The focus school is all about getting into and staying in flow. The efficiency school is obsessed with the logistics of work.

      Tiago positions his philosophy as the value school: Making sure you deliver value after every block of work by delivering, what Tiago calls, Intermediate Packets.

      He draws parallels to Just In Time production from Toyota and Continuous Integration in software development.

      Intermediate Packets is continuous integration for knowledge work.