165 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. In our series, learning linked data, we've covered several topics related to querying linked data using several SPARQL features and techniques, producing linked data using RDFa and working with JSON-LD.

      I don't see a link to the other articles in this series...

  2. Jul 2020
  3. Jun 2020
    1. Horwitz argued a fairly radical point, which I think never received wide enough recognition due to the subject matter and his extremely difficult (dense and dry) style.  He said, “I seek to show that one of the crucial choices made during the antebellum period was to promote economic growth primarily through the legal, not the tax, system, a choice which had major consequences for the distribution of wealth and power in American society”

      I'll have to add this book to my to read stack.

  4. May 2020
    1. “Make it right” means that the code is maintainable and easy to change. Humans can read it, not just computers. New engineers can easily add functionality to the code. When there’s a defect, it is easy to isolate and correct.
    1. Docker 19.03 does this automatically # by setting the DOCKER_HOST in # https://github.com/docker-library/docker/blob/d45051476babc297257df490d22cbd806f1b11e4/19.03/docker-entrypoint.sh#L23-L29
    1. In 1945 Jacques S. Hadamard surveyed mathematicians to determine their mental processes at work by posing a series of questions to them and later published his results in An Essay on the Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field.

      I suspect this might be an interesting read.

    1. “The Art of Memory in Late Medieval East Central Europe (Bohemia, Hungary, Poland): An Anthology,” co-written by Lucie Doležalová, Rafał Wójcik and myself.
    2. In the Ars memorandi noua secretissima, published in 1500 or 1501,20 Jodocus Weczdorff de Triptis (Weimar) inserted an alphabetical list of words, similar to that of Celtis, but he simply suggested that it could be used as a memory house without any scope for our private associations. Moreover, the alphabetic table of Celtis was included in the famous Margarita philosophica nova of Gregor Reisch, which was probably the most popular handbook of the artes scholars in the fi rst two decades of the 16th century.

      Books on memory that used Celtes' trick

    Tags

    Annotators

  5. Apr 2020
    1. the cost of reading consent formats or privacy notices is still too high.
    2. Third, the focus should be centered on improving transparency rather than requesting systematic consents. Lack of transparency and clarity doesn’t allow informed and unambiguous consent (in particular, where privacy policies are lengthy, complex, vague and difficult to navigate). This ambiguity creates a risk of invalidating the consent.

      systematic consents

    3. the authority found that each digital platform’s privacy policies, which include the consent format, were between 2,500 and 4,500 words and would take an average reader between 10 and 20 minutes to read.
    1. def save(self, *args, **kwargs): return

      def delete(self, *args, **kwargs): return

      from django.db import models

      class MyReadOnlyModel(models.Model): class Meta: managed = False

  6. Mar 2020
    1. Because humans hate being bored or confused and there are countless ways to make decisions look off-puttingly boring or complex — be it presenting reams of impenetrable legalese in tiny greyscale lettering so no-one will bother reading
    1. "I have read and agree to the terms and conditions” may well be the most common lie in the history of civilization. How many times do you scroll and click accept without a second thought? You’re not alone. Not only they go unread, but they also include a self-updating clause requiring you to go back and review those documents for changes. You’re agreeing to any changes, and their consequences, indefinitely. 
    1. And, frankly, we’re abetting this behavior. Most users just click or tap “okay” to clear the pop-up and get where they’re going. They rarely opt to learn more about what they’re agreeing to. Research shows that the vast majority of internet users don’t read terms of service or privacy policies — so they’re probably not reading cookie policies, either. They’re many pages long, and they’re not written in language that’s simple enough for the average person to understand.
    2. But in the end, they’re not doing much: Most of us just tediously click “yes” and move on.
    3. The site invites you to read its “cookie policy,” (which, let’s be honest, you’re not going to do), and it may tell you the tracking is to “enhance” your experience — even though it feels like it’s doing the opposite.
  7. Feb 2020
    1. We believe load test scripts should be plain code to get all the benefits of version control, as opposed to say unreadable and tool generated XML.

      Saw another comment lamenting the use of ugly/unreasonable XML files:

      https://github.com/flood-io/ruby-jmeter

      Tired of using the JMeter GUI or looking at hairy XML files?

  8. Jan 2020
    1. Thyroxine was added to their antidepressant medication, and the doses were increased to a mean of 482 ± 72 μg/day.

      This is the highest dose of levothyroxine that I've seen administered. Even treatment for thyroid cancer rarely goes beyond 300 mcg (or even 200 mcg, which is more common).

    1. a private library is not an ego-boosting appendages but a research tool. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means … allow you to put there. You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you menacingly. Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books. Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.
    1. Timothy Morton is Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University in Houston. He is the author of Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality and Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End Of The World.

      want to read these

    1. he ZORA Canon, our list of the 100 greatest books ever written by African American women, is one of a kind, yet it exists within a rich cultural tradition.
    1. I was going through the source for Thin and noticed that instead of using require, Marc-Andre Cournoyer was using a method called autoload to load thin's constituent parts.
  9. Dec 2019
    1. n their book “New Power,” Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans lay out the characteristics of old and new power.<img class="ex t u je ak" src="https://miro.medium.com/max/1862/1*jmW_5ey9vS_fNMPt5qO5Cg.png" width="931" height="522" role="presentation"/>
  10. Nov 2019
    1. Seeking more fuel from art, Proust started reading John Ruskin, whose influential The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) and The Stones of Venice (1851-53) revived popular interest in medieval art.

      want to read

  11. Oct 2019
    1. I wanted my students to gain an awareness of a growing body of work by sociologists, theorists, historians and literary scholars in a field known as “whiteness studies,” the cornerstones of which include Toni Morrison’s “Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination,” David Roediger’s “The Wages of Whiteness,” Matthew Frye Jacobson’s “Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race,” Richard Dyer’s “White” and more recently Nell Irvin Painter’s “The History of White People.”

      Want to read

    2. I wondered if he was an ethnic white rather than a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The historian Matthew Frye Jacobson, in “Whiteness of a Different Color,” describes “the 20th century’s reconsolidating of the 19th century’s ‘Celts, Slavs, Hebrews and Mediterraneans.’ ” By the 1940s, according to David Roediger, “given patterns of intermarriage across ethnicity and Cold War imperatives,” whites stopped dividing hierarchically within whiteness and begin identifying as socially constructed Caucasians.

      I wonder if it's possible to continue this trend to everyone else? Did the effect stop somewhere? What caused it to? What might help it continue?

    1. This is one reason I was glad to come across Reframing Superintelligence: Comprehensive AI Services As General Intelligence by Eric Drexler, a researcher who works alongside Bostrom at Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute. This 200 page report is not quite as readable as Superintelligence; its highly-structured outline form belies the fact that all of its claims start sounding the same after a while. But it’s five years more recent, and presents a very different vision of how future AI might look.
  12. Sep 2019
    1. Universal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice by Meyer, Rose, and Gordon (a book recognized as the core statement about UDL, which you can read for free) walks us through how educators actively change their practice to become more inclusive and helps us weigh choices in terms of how we create unnecessary barriers:
    1. Safiya Noble, Algorithms of Oppression (New York: New York University Press, 2018). See also Mozilla’s 2019 Internet Health Report at https://internethealthreport.org/2019/lets-ask-more-of-ai/.
  13. Aug 2019
    1. Which brings me back to 1984.  Also in that year, Michael Piore and Charles Sabel published The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity (Basic). They found their new highly flexible manufacturing firms in northwestern and central Italy instead of Silicon Valley.  Their entrepreneurs had ties to communist parties and the Catholic Church instead of liberation sympathies. But the idea was much the same: computers would be the key to flexible specialization. For all the talk since about economic complexity, that is the book about the changing division of labor worth re-reading.

      want to read this

  14. Jul 2019
    1. I wondered if he was an ethnic white rather than a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The historian Matthew Frye Jacobson, in “Whiteness of a Different Color,” describes “the 20th century’s reconsolidating of the 19th century’s ‘Celts, Slavs, Hebrews and Mediterraneans.’ ” By the 1940s, according to David Roediger, “given patterns of intermarriage across ethnicity and Cold War imperatives,” whites stopped dividing hierarchically within whiteness and begin identifying as socially constructed Caucasians.

      I wonder if it's possible to continue this trend to everyone else? Did the effect stop somewhere? What caused it to? What might help it continue?

    2. I wanted my students to gain an awareness of a growing body of work by sociologists, theorists, historians and literary scholars in a field known as “whiteness studies,” the cornerstones of which include Toni Morrison’s “Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination,” David Roediger’s “The Wages of Whiteness,” Matthew Frye Jacobson’s “Whiteness of a Different Color: European Immigrants and the Alchemy of Race,” Richard Dyer’s “White” and more recently Nell Irvin Painter’s “The History of White People.”

      Want to read

  15. Jun 2019
  16. May 2019
  17. Apr 2019
    1. While I would say that Alexander L. George and Andrew Bennett’s book “Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences“, is neither a new book nor an old one (it was published in 2004), it is definitely a classic and a must-read. Moreover, I’m a comparativist, and someone who undertakes systematic case study comparisons, so George and Bennett’s book is definitely my go-to when I want to revise my research strategy.
  18. Feb 2019
    1. “Read” is how we explore the web. Web literate individuals understand basic web mechanics such as the difference between names and addresses on the web, and how data is linked and moves through the infrastructure of the web.
  19. Jan 2019
    1. Modifies a list to be sorted

      ? Like modifies to be sorted, like what does that mean? Sorts it? by what criteria?

    2. Note that when two integers are divided, the result is a floating point.

      note: check up what a floating point exactly means Googled : How floating-point numbers work The idea is to compose a number of two main parts:

      A significand that contains the number’s digits. Negative significands represent negative numbers. An exponent that says where the decimal (or binary) point is placed relative to the beginning of the significand. Negative exponents represent numbers that are very small (i.e. close to zero).

  20. Sep 2018
    1. The basic assumption that underlies typical reading instruction in many schools is that learning to read is a natural process, much like learning to talk. But decades of scientific research has revealed that reading doesn't come naturally. The human brain isn't wired to read. Kids must be explicitly taught how to connect sounds with letters — phonics.
    1. 2011-06-23 at OSBridge2011 having lunch with Ward, Tantek exclaimed: The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb

      This is what I want too!

  21. Aug 2018
    1. Similarly, the moral foundations theory originally put forth by Jonathan Haidt and Jesse Graham purports that humans have (in the most common and widely discussed versions of the theory) five innate moral building blocks: care/harm; fairness/cheating; loyalty/betrayal (associated with in-group/out-group consciousness); authority/subversion; and sanctity/degradation (“sanctity” is also often referred to as “purity” in the relevant discussions). Liberals are highly attuned to care/harm and fairness/reciprocity, but conservatives, while valuing care, also emphasize authority and purity, which means that their approach to care/harm will be very different from that of liberals. (In fairness, many on the far Left also emphasize purity and fall into authoritarianism.)

      This could be worth a read as well.

  22. Jul 2018
    1. Likes, upvotes, replies, friending. What if it’s all just linking? In fact, what if linking is actually more meaningful!

      This is sort of the fun, I think, in maintaining things like listen and read posts on my site. While they're a useful archive for me, in some part I hope they might speed some discovery for folks who find them or search them by category/tag as well.

      I could post somewhere, "Hey I listen to this podcast," or retweet a headline, but invariably in the morass of content out there, there isn't actually an indication that I invested my finite amount of time actually listening to or reading that thing. Perhaps I was just doing some social signaling to make myself seem more interesting or worldly? To me this is a lot of the value of these types of posts.

    1. “INFORMATION RULES”—published in 1999 but still one of the best books on digital economics—Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian, two economists, popularised the term “network effects”,

      I want to get a copy of this book.

  23. Jun 2018
    1. grazie ad Andrea Borruso ( @aborruso )

      a questo link è illustrata la procedura per realizzare l'embedding di hypothes.is all'interno di un documento Read the Docs. Una comoda utilità per consentire la partecipazione online alla redazione di un documento, postando il commento direttamente nella parola o rigo di interesse del commentatore.

  24. May 2018
  25. Mar 2018
    1. A high-level technical explanation of how Dropbox's PDF annotation interface is implemented.

      Quite interesting for Hypothesis.

  26. Dec 2017
    1. In this section, we look at some different ways to design an experiment. The primary distinction we will make is between approaches in which each participant experiences one level of the independent variable and approaches in which each participant experiences all levels of the independent variable. The former are called between-subjects experiments and the latter are called within-subjects experiments.

      For the most part this section of Ecperimental Design was an easy read and had very few confusing parts. I was able to follow along and understand all the components of an Experimental Design

  27. Nov 2017
    1. To support text and data mining as a standard and essential tool for research, the UK should move towards establishing by default that for published research the right to read is also the right to mine data, where that does not result in products that substitute for the original works. Government should include potential uses of data for AI when assessing how to support for text and data mining.
    1. Harvey Weinstein’s Army of SpiesThe film executive hired private investigators, including ex-Mossad agents, to track actresses and journalists.
    1. “You Can’t Go Any Lower”: Inside the West Wing, Trump Is Apoplectic as Allies Fear ImpeachmentAfter Monday’s indictments, the president blamed Jared Kushner in a call to Steve Bannon, while others are urging him to take off the gloves with Robert Mueller.
  28. Oct 2017
    1. U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Thursday that the U.S. military has more than 1,000 personnel in the region, an apparent reference to an area that includes Niger as well as Mali and Nigeria.
    1. It’s a Fact: Supreme Court Errors Aren’t Hard to Find A ProPublica review adds fuel to a longstanding worry about the nation’s highest court: The justices can botch the truth, sometimes in cases of great import.
    1. But these are also all characteristics that make What3Words completely unsuitable as either a global or national address register. So I was dismayed to read that Mongolia have decided to adopt it as their national register. I’m hoping that this isn’t really the case and that story is similar to the apocryphal tales of Honduras’s blockchain based land registry.
    2. The problem is that What3Words is a proprietary, closed system. The algorithm is patented. The data is closed, with the terms and conditions spelling out in great detail all of the things you can’t do with the system
    1. Trump blindsides advisers with promised opioid plan Officials are scrambling to produce an emergency declaration by next week.
    1. The Boomtown That Shouldn’t Exist Cape Coral was built on total lies. One big storm could wipe it off the map. Oh, and it’s also the fastest-growing city in the United States.
    1. Justice John G. Roberts Jr., arguing that the South had taken great strides that made the protections of the act unnecessary, based his decision in part on a Senate Judiciary Committee analysis that misinterpreted how the Census Bureau reports race and ethnicity data and wrongly suggested that registration gaps between minorities and whites had shrunk significantly, an error that neither he nor his clerks caught.

      Stunning Omission

    1. Neil Postman noted in his 1985 book Amusing Ourselves to Death

      Need to look into this book. The cultural shift (text->image = logic->emotion) is an interesting idea, but I'd like to see how it is argued.

  29. Sep 2017