29 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. The Javits Center is often used by urbanists as an example of the perils of inhumane design. The unused and un-policed periphery attracts crime and vagrancy while its one entrance opens upon an eight lane street. This combination means that most conference attendees hire a taxi to ferry them to a more hospitable neighborhood.

      This is an excellent example of creation without context, particularly use by target populations. Walkability was so poor that it negatively affected the area.

    2. Much has been made over the symbolism of the Public Square’s corporate aesthetic, its ‘gaudy’ stairway monument, and the exclusive luxury of its mall. I believe this is overstated; New York has plenty of examples of luxury developments and amenities which also contribute to the fabric of the city, including Rockefeller Center, the World Trade Center memorial site, and Fifth Avenue. With time, these markers of status will ebb and a new development will claim the hyper-lux mantle.

      This is another example of the author rejecting popular criticism by leaders of the field. He tempers his comments towards the design of the space by mentioning other historic examples in the city.

      This may also be a connection to the general public who have embraced (as a novelty) the Hudson Yards. It gives the author a sense of reliability, compared to the highbrow disdain of art critics.

    3. Street front retail creates foot traffic in places that might otherwise be desolate and inhospitable during different parts of the day. A diversity of land uses is key in cultivating walkability. For example, New York’s financial district is generally a ghost town after office hours because it lacks residential buildings. Adjacent Battery Park City has the opposite problem; it is so domestic that its streets are empty except during commuting hours.

      Cites two examples of spaces in the city that fail to maximize walkability and reduces user satisfaction/use. Users require mixed-use spaces that promote diverse populations, keeping them from becoming too exclusive and barren during the off hours.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. For example, the collegeimpact theories of Tinto’s Theory of Student Departure(2006) or Astin’s Theory of Involvement (1999) suggest thatengagement and integration in the social systems of uni-versity/college life (i.e., experiencing rewarding encounterswithin the university/college community that lead to thesharing of normative values and attitudes with both peers andfaculty) are critical predictors of successful academicachievement (also see Chickering and Reisser1993)

      The author is giving an example to support his claim that indeed social ties develop the student's character and self-presentation and worth which can show how those who lack social skills and suffer anxiety can suffer as a result of the absence of basic social survival instincts.

    1. This page is not necessarily attractive to look at but it is a thorough presentation of various features of infographics. Features are organized by topic and generally presented as a bulleted list. The focus of the page is how to use infographics for assessment; however, the page is useful to those who wish to learn how to create infographics and to identify the software tools that can be used to create them easily. Rating 4/5

    1. Learn why Hybrid App Technologies is the right choice in 2019 and which hybrid apps are making huge a name this year? Begin your business startup with the best Hybrid mobile app solution.

      Learn why Hybrid App Technologies is the right choice in 2019 and which hybrid apps are making huge a name this year? Begin your business startup with the best Hybrid mobile app solution.

    1. In this section, the D.A.R.E. program was described as an incredibly popular program in schools across the United States despite the fact that research consistently suggests that this program is largely ineffective

      I remember this program in elementary school and a lot of others know the program from before as well. But I think being here in college especially WSU which is known to be a party school it is more likely for us students to not care or remember this program which is why the program is considered ineffective. Especially with Marijuana now being legal in Washington state, another reason it is ineffective.

    2. many people have an understandable desire to attain a healthy weight

      Here at WSU I have come to meet many people who care about their weight and watch what they eat. Many of the people I've come to know go to the gym regularly as well, that's why here at WSU students are able to go to the gym like the REC and even at the Stephenson Complex they have a gym there that's closer than the REC for some students and there is the Chinook too on the opposite side and many students attend all three places to get a good workout.

  3. Sep 2018
  4. Jun 2018
    1. Example1.61.Consider the two-element setPfp;q;rgwith the discrete ordering.The setAfp;qgdoes not have a join inPbecause ifxwas a join, we would needpxandqx, and there is no such elementx.Example1.62.In any posetP, we havep_pp^pp.Example1.63.In a power set, the meet of a collection of subsets is their intersection,while the join is their union. This justifies the terminology.Example1.64.In a total order, the meet of a set is its infimum, while the join of a set isits supremum.Exercise1.65.Recall the division ordering onNfrom Example 1.29: we say thatnmifndivides perfectly intom. What is the meet of two numbers in this poset? Whatabout the join?

      These are all great examples. I htink 1.65 is gcd and lcm.

  5. Feb 2018
    1. Like the teachers at New Dorp, I believe in conscious skill instruction and over the years have made my own list of missing skills. One is the skill of giving specific concrete examples in an essay.

      This is very similar to the Primary text in that it reinforces the title of not writing with ideas but with objects. Haltman had a very conscious and specific desire for one to be more descriptive and vivid in the description of concrete items. This type of writing makes it easier for readers to picture and allows them to relate to and imagine one's writing. I have been using this kind of writing in my primary source description and it has helped my writing. These texts are very parallel in their main ideas.

    1. songs

      All that I have given up to this let them serve as examples of the way in which the Connaught peasant puts his love-thoughts into song and verse, whether it be hope or despair, grief or joy, that affect him. (147)

      In these final lines of the book, the reader is offered Hyde’s selection of songs as a faithful and complete insight into vernacular Connacht song about the theme of love. Moreover, Hyde suggests that in reading this anthology one achieves a good degree of familiarity with an idealized, essentially native ‘Connaught peasant’.

      Although speakers in the songs are variously male and female, and the reasons for separation from absent lovers differ, the experience of love is fairly uniform throughout. It is a sore experience of unrealized desire. That scenario produces a pronouncedly virtuous image of the ‘Connaught peasant’ for a number of reasons.

      The reader encounters deep loyalty where admiration is unstinted by forbiddance of love because of emigration, lack of requital, or death. ‘Úna Bhán,’ for example, is preceded by a long passage explaining how deeply a bereaved lover missed the fair Úna after, until he himself passed away. Also, Hyde’s anthology is particularly rich in its examples of similes drawn from the natural world. See ‘my love is of the colour of the blackberries’ (5) in ‘If I Were to Go West’, ‘I would not think the voice of a thrush more sweet’ (27) in ‘Long I Am Going,’ and ‘My love is like the blossom of the sloe on the brown blackthorn’ (31) in ‘An Droighneán Donn’. In the vivid rendering of these images, the beauty of the desired lover is stressed, and the delicate sensibility of the speaker is inherently implied. The Connaught peasant is thoroughly valorized as a result.

      Accounting for consistencies among what anthologies include, and among what they exclude, can highlight their organizing agenda. One obvious example in the area of Irish Studies is the Field Day Anthology controversy, detailed in depth by Caitríona Crowe in The Dublin Review: https://thedublinreview.com/article/testimony-to-a-flowering/

      In the case of Hyde’s Love Songs, consistencies among excluded material strengthen our perception of how actively he sought to contrive an estimable image of the Connaught peasant. Though Hyde claims his selection is emblematic of the love-thought of that idealized personage, he does not provide any examples of la chanson de la malmariée. This variety of song is so widespread that Seán Ó Tuama, who was the principal authority on the theme of love in Irish folksong, included it as one of five major genres in his article ‘Love in Irish Folksong’ (in the book Repossessions: Selected Essays on the Irish Literary Heritage. Such songs are an expression of grief by a young woman unhappily married to an elderly man.

      If we are to view the songs anthologized by Hyde in a broader context of Connacht songs about love, an awareness of the chanson de la malmariéé is required. Faoi Rothaí na Gréine (1999) is a relatively recently published collection of Connacht songs. The collecting work was done in Galway between 1927 and 1932 by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, and latterly edited by Professor Ríonach Uí Ógáin. ‘An Droigheán Donn’, ‘Úna Bhán’, and ‘Mal Dubh an Ghleanna’ are common to Faoi Rothaí na Gréine and Love Songs of Connacht. The inclusion in the former of two famous songs of the malmariée genre, ‘Dar Mo Mhóide Ní Phósfainn Thú’ (I Swear I Wouldn’t Marry You), and ‘Amhrán an Tae’ (The Tea Song) demonstrate the strong presence of that genre in the ‘love-thought’ of vernacular Connacht song.

      This way of framing discussion of Love Songs of Connacht invites close interrogation of Hyde’s biases. The choice of material for inclusion and exclusion is ideologically cohesive, to the specific end of creating a valorous image of the idealized native peasant. In my M.A. thesis, I might further refine the line of argument pursued in this annotation, and use it as the basis on which to build a discussion of Hyde’s particular ideological motivations.

  6. Aug 2017
  7. Jul 2017
    1. Students have used UMW Blogs to create literary journals, survey properties around Fredericksburg, build online exhibits, connect with the authors of the works their reading, publish their poetry, develop  in-depth online resources, and, of course, blog.

      examples of student uses of DoOO

  8. Apr 2017
    1. hypothetical example of a questionnaire

      I would love to see more of these - in published papers, for example - or just tutorials that take us from raw data to tidy data to analysis/computations in R.

    1. dependencies between a network's actors. For example, associations among network exposure (e.g., attitudes of one's peers), network indicators (e.g., size, transitivity), and individual attributes are nonindependent

      This seems key - especially when I think of how we study covariates in statistics and how predictor variables can be confounding, mediating or moderating...

  9. Sep 2016
    1. language or customs.

      these are examples of explicit culture. Something in a culture that you can't actually touch or feel but helps you learn about the culture for example language and traditions.

  10. Dec 2015
    1. v := RTView new. s := (RTBox new size: 30) + RTLabel. es := s elementsOn: (1 to: 20). v addAll: es. RTGridLayout on: es. v

      Nice! Here is just another example with no single letter named variables, and more explicit data:

      | visual composedShape data viewElements |
      visual := RTView new.
      data := #('lion-o' 'panthro' 'tigro' 'chitara' 'munra' 'ozimandias' 'Dr Manhatan').
      composedShape := (RTEllipse new size: 100; color: Color veryLightGray) + RTLabel.
      viewElements := composedShape elementsOn: data.
      visual addAll: viewElements. 
      RTGridLayout on: viewElements.
      visual
      

      At the beginning I understood that data "comes from Smalltalk", but may be adding some tips with alternative examples, explicit data and longer variable names, could help newbies like me by offering comparisons with numerical and intrinsic data inside the image. The explanation about composed shapes and "+" sign is very well done.

  11. Apr 2015
    1. Technologies are merely tools that can be used in a variety of ways
      • word processing
      • video-streaming
      • audio-broadcasting
      • a calculator
  12. Mar 2015
    1. Machines that Make The Machine that make project at the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms seeks to develop low-cost machines that can be made using CNC equipment, like available in fab labs.
  13. Apr 2014
    1. it empowers the entire scientific community by enabling new advancements and tools for scholarly communication.

      What kind of advancements?

    2. science will produce improved results and better serve the community.

      How will the results be improved and in what way will the community be better served?

      I expect you explain how later in the document and provide examples, but to strengthen the intro and capture your readers give the a teaser of what's to come if they continue reading.

  14. Oct 2013
    1. Nor is it without advantage, indeed, that inelegant and faulty speeches, yet such as many, from depravity of taste, would admire, should be read before boys and that it should be shown how many expressions in them are inappropriate, obscure, tumid, low, mean, affected, or effeminate

      We often learn the most through bad examples

    1. Enthymemes are based upon one or other of four kinds of alleged fact: (1) Probabilities, (2) Examples, (3) Infallible Signs, (4) Ordinary Signs.

      types of facts. I didn't know about these.

    1. Three points must be studied in making a speech; and we have now completed the account of (1) Examples, Maxims, Enthymemes, and in general the thought-element -- the way to invent and refute arguments. [1403b] We have next to discuss (2) Style, and (3) Arrangement.

      3 points of speechmaking