22 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Hulme and colleagues set out to reveal patterns of attention and, in particular, patterns of framing6 with regards to how climate change is portrayed in these editorials, and how these patterns are related to wider political and scientific events. The authors identified frames by reading and discussing nearly 500 editorials on climate change (333 in Nature, 160 in Science) published in the two journals between 1966 and 2016, extracted using search terms such as ‘climate’, ‘greenhouse’, ‘carbon’, ‘warming’, ‘weather’, ‘atmosphere’ and ‘pollution’.
  2. Jan 2021
    1. Material is the metaphor The metaphor of material defines the relationship between space and motion. The idea is that the technology is inspired by paper and ink and is utilized to facilitate creativity and innovation. Surfaces and edges provide familiar visual cues that allow users to quickly understand the technology beyond the physical world.
  3. Dec 2020
    1. Types of Structure Outliners take advantage of what may be the most primitive of relationships, probably the first one you learned as an infant: in. Things can be in or contained by other things; alternatively, things can be superior to other things in a pecking order. Whatever the cognitive mechanics, trees/hierarchies are a preferred way of structuring things. But it is not the only way. Computer users also encounter: links, relationships, attributes, spatial/tabular arrangements, and metaphoric content. Links are what we know from the Web, but they can be so much more. The simplest ones are a sort of ad hoc spaghetti connecting pieces of text to text containers (like Web pages), but we will see many interesting kinds that have names, programs attached, and even work two-way. Relationships are what databases do, most easily imagined as “is-a” statements which are simple types of rules: Ted is a supervisor, supervisors are employees, all employees have employee numbers. Attributes are adjectives or tags that help characterize or locate things. Finder labels and playlists are good examples of these. Spatial/tabular arrangements are obvious: the very existence of the personal computer sprang from the power of the spreadsheet. Metaphors are a complex and powerful technique of inheriting structure from something familiar. The Mac desktop is a good example. Photoshop is another, where all the common tools had a darkroom tool or technique as their predecessor.

      Structuring Information

      Ted Goranson holds that there are only a couple of ways to structure information.

      In — Possibly the most primitive of relationships. Things can be in other things and things can be superior to other things.

      Links —Links are what we know from the web, but these types of links or only one implementation. There are others, like bi-directional linking.

      Relationships — This is what we typically use databases for and is most easily conceived as "is-a" statements.

      Attributes — Adjectives or tags that help characterize or locate things.

      Metaphors — A technique for inheriting structure from something familiar.

  4. Oct 2020
    1. And if they are a technical debt - how do measure up how much you can borrow so you can afford the repayments?
    2. debt ... which is not a straight bad thing but something that could provide some "short term financing" get us to survive the project (how many of us could afford to buy a house without taking out the mortgage?).
    3. But recently I started to think about default values as some sort of a technical debt ... which is not a straight bad thing but something that could provide some "short term financing" get us to survive the project
  5. Sep 2020
    1. The custom code "fills in the blanks" for the framework, such as supplying a table of menu items and registering a code subroutine for each item
    1. Could a learning environment have seasons

      I'm really intrigued by this. Are there "seasons" in a course design? (We do talk about things being "hot" or "cooling down", of content "coming down in buckets"...) That's a season which teachers (and to an extent students) can control.

      What about the seasons of a learner's life - and not just in terms of chronological age, but of life stages?

      We know there are curricular "seasons" - again, in terms of heavy and light workload times, new student arrivals and graduations of students as they finish, faculty retirements - but do we address these as liminal times of our shared culture, or just as scheduling hassles?

  6. Apr 2020
    1. I am increasingly concerned when I hear my colleagues refer to themselves with computer metaphors—“I don’t have the bandwidth,” “I have to boot up,” or “I need to recharge.”
  7. Jun 2019
    1. To put our toxic relationship with Big Tech into perspective, critics have compared social media to a lot of bad things. Tobacco. Crystal meth. Pollution. Cars before seat belts. Chemicals before Superfund sites. But the most enduring metaphor is junk food: convenient but empty; engineered to be addictive; makes humans unhealthy and corporations rich.
  8. Apr 2018
    1. Good folk, I have no coin; To take were to purloin: I have no copper in my purse, I have no silver either, And all my gold is on the furze

      In these lines I noticed that Laura was speaking about money and she metaphorically connected it to being on the flowers in which she called the Furze.

  9. Nov 2017
  10. May 2017
    1. Rather than sit back and let a so-called free market do its thing, I found Esther’s commentary an encouraging invitation to get one’s hands dirty

      this is a great way to read it, but I'm hoping we could start using a different metaphor than "the marketplace"...see conversation around this on Mike Caulfield's recent post on the annotation layer as a "marketplace" for context

    1. when it comes to truth the necessary conditions to a functional marketplace don't exist

      What is a functional marketplace? It seems like there is the fantasy of a functional marketplace that is fair to all participants. Do we have an example of such a marketplace? Or are all marketplaces structured by certain frameworks that priviliege some participants over others?

  11. Aug 2016
    1. the value of a residential, liberal-arts college lies in the continuous slate of opportunities that students receive to start and restart their lives over the course of their college years.

      Is the liberal arts missing a chance to connect better with students by likening the college experience to video games?

  12. Sep 2015
    1. Some combine structuralist interpretations of house form and culture with the metaphor of the human body

      Our body is the home for our soul and mind, but our body needs a home as well.. Depending on our individualistic needs and wants that can influence how we develop and use the structure.

  13. May 2015
  14. Oct 2013
    1. All these ideas may be expressed either as similes or as metaphors; those which succeed as metaphors will obviously do well also as similes, and similes, with the explanation omitted, will appear as metaphors.
    1. Metaphor, moreover, gives style clearness, charm, and distinction as nothing else can: and it is not a thing whose use can be taught by one man to another. Metaphors, like epithets, must be fitting, which means that they must fairly correspond to the thing signified: failing this, their inappropriateness will be conspicuous: the want of harmony between two things is emphasized by their being placed side by side.