17 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. People who write extensively about note-writing rarely have a serious context of use https://notes.andymatuschak.org/zUMFE66dxeweppDvgbNAb5hukXzXQu8ErVNv

      This idea can be extrapolated to a much larger set of practitioners. It could be termed "the curse of the influencer".

      link to: - aphorism: "Those who can't do, teach", from the original line ‘Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach’ in George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 stage play Man and Superman.

  2. May 2022
    1. and link me to a paid course, no doubt

      I will agree that there are far too many "influencers" and "gurus" out there selling something in the note taking space. Almost none of them know what the hell they're talking about.

  3. Mar 2022
    1. Posting a new algorithm, poem, or video on the web makes it a vailable, but unless appropriate recipients notice it, the originator has little chance to influence them.

      An early statement of the problem of distribution which has been widely solved by many social media algorithmic feeds. Sadly pushing ideas to people interested in them (or not) doesn't seem to have improved humanity. Perhaps too much of the problem space with respect to the idea of "influence" has been devoted to marketing and commerce or to fringe misinformation spaces? How might we create more value to the "middle" of the populace while minimizing misinformation and polarization?

  4. Feb 2022
    1. https://therebooting.substack.com/p/the-roaring-20s-of-digital-publishing

      A somewhat analytical take on where media and particularly journalism, is with respect to decentralization caused by newsletters and influencer journalists.

    2. Hypehouses were a development that made middle-aged people feel even older. The idea of random people living together to make TikTok videos sounds like hell on earth. And it turns out to be pretty much hell on earth.

      Hypehouse (collab house) examples: * https://www.vox.com/the-goods/22877013/hype-house-netflix-show * https://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/celebs/a34655703/tiktok-sway-house/ * https://harpers.org/archive/2021/06/tiktok-house-collab-house-the-anxiety-of-influencers/ * Does Clubhouse, the app, count? It seemed like a hypehouse for hyping hype.


      What happens when hype runs amok?

    1. Nonfiction Techniques Spring 2022

      Caveat emptor. A lot of these "influencer" methods are leaving 30% or far more of their value with the platforms they're using for distribution. A better path is to build and promote your own platform and have a direct relationship with one's readers (in newsletter spaces, it's about "owning"/having your reader's email address). Some other newsletter options can be found here: https://indieweb.org/newsletter as well as methods for building and owning your own technology stack across its site. If nothing else, consider having a website where you can have a portfolio/archive of your work.

      Careful watchers of the newsletter space will notice that almost all of the highlight examples on these services are established big names with pre-existing platforms and audience. Where are the stories of the other 99.9% and how well they're doing? Who is actually making a full time living doing this without a significant leg up to start? As examples, look for major writers leaving the New York Times to set up newsletters, or people like Steve Hayes and Jonah Goldberg leaving The National Review to set up The Dispatch (as a newsletter platform)—it's a good bet that they're getting a better deal from Substack than the average person. The NiemanLab has some relatively good coverage of some of this space. (Their annual predictions series also has solid forward looking coverage of the journalism/technology space: https://www.niemanlab.org/collection/predictions-2022/.)

      (Apologies for lurking... 😅, but happy to chat technology/publishing with anyone interested.)

  5. Jan 2022
    1. Another company, Pietra, connects influencers with manufacturers in order to help them launch their own product lines.

      When manufacturers, like Pietra, help influencers manufacture their own product lines, we've taken another step from big celebrities having their own product lines (think Martha Stewart cookware and other lifestyle plays her company has made).

      This is splitting the difference between the Tupperware parties of old where you're empowering your users to sell your product and having celebrities sell your product.

      What is the next step along this evolutionary path of breaking down the sales funnel? Can it be disintermediated further?

      Another example of this are the thousands of small Etsy shops that are churning out products as intermediaries. An example of this is the proliferation of sticker companies that are selling somewhat custom designs for 2-3x the going rate and adding a rather large mark up for themselves. In this case there are at least some modest creative pieces being added in the value chain, but at what overall cost?

      Will everyone be a manufacturer? When does it all become Amway?

  6. May 2021
    1. So the truth is that the influencer economy is just a garish accentuation of the economy writ large. As our culture continues to conflate the private and public realms—as the pandemic has transformed our homes into offices and our bedrooms into backdrops, as public institutions increasingly fall prey to the mandates of the market—we’ve become cheerfully indentured to the idea that our worth as individuals isn’t our personal integrity or sense of virtue, but our ability to advertise our relevance on the platforms of multinational tech corporations.
    2. In a way, the essential premise of the collab-house business model is not far from that of pornographic entertainment. (Where else do talent and crew and cadres of management congregate in furnished mansions to produce intimate content?) Interestingly, but maybe not surprisingly, many TikTok influencers, including some here at the Clubhouse, have made the crossover from social media to pornography, using apps such as OnlyFans to post nude pics for their legions of subscribers.
    3. Think of the most common forms of influencer content: There are makeup tutorials and exercise regimens and tips for heterodox diets. There are bathroom selfies and self-portraits in bed and endless I just woke up confessions.
    1. Yet apart from a few megastar “influencers”, most creators receive no reward beyond the thrill of notching up “likes”.

      But what are these people really making? Besides one or two of the highest paid, what is a fair-to-middling influencer really making?

  7. Dec 2020
    1. I also think journalism and music both feed into the major lie of the internet that just because it is possible to reach people all over that means it is likely that will happen for you.

      the lie underlying almost all ideas of being an "influencer"....

  8. Oct 2020
    1. Aaron, to change the famous quote, "It's not the number of characters (140 or 280), but the content of your character that define you." I far prefer reading your links, analysis, and even thought leadership here to people I've never met on twitter with thousands of followers.

  9. Jul 2019
    1. STEALING large bunches of lavender from a farmer’s field is not “cute”, it’s not a “memento”, it’s not “helping to put the place on the map” – it’s THEFT, following a spell of TRESPASS onto that owner’s land.

      An interesting look at "influencer morality".

  10. Apr 2019
    1. While you can outsource Bitcoin mining to a computer, people still mine for social capital on social networks largely through their own blood, sweat, and tears.

      The other portion of the problem is then turning this social capital into actual money. This gives way to the rise of influencers.