15 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. 5 technology enabled learning trends in 2017 This article was produced by a credible publisher and is included here because it points to the need for both mobile learning and micro learning. The authors assert but do not provide data for the increasing need for microlearning. This form of learning is said to be important because it is associated with the real world. Rating 4/5

    1. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

  2. Dec 2018
    1. While many blogs get dozens or hundreds of visitors, Searls' site attracts thousands. "I partly don't want to care what the number is," he says. "I used to work in broadcasting, where everyone was obsessed by that. I don't want an audience. I feel I'm writing stuff that's part of a conversation. Conversations don't have audiences."

      Social media has completely ignored this sort of sentiment and gamified and psychoanalyzed it's way into the polar opposite direction all for the sake of "engagement", clicks, data gathering, and advertising.

  3. Nov 2018
    1. How Technology can Shape Adult Education

      The author provides a brief overview of methods that technology can be used in adult education. Specifically, gamification and virtual reality are described to be ways to make adult education fun and interactive. Rating: 4/5

  4. Jul 2018
    1. I’m thinking about video games, and how I learn playing them.

      Important anecdote for thinking about "gamification". The idea that games produce their own learning, without social structures or personal reflection processes, is over-simplistic.

      (Sidebar: a colleague once said to me "Gamification means making a (crummy) game. I want to make good games with my students.")

  5. Aug 2017
  6. Jun 2017
    1. he biggest problem with gamification is that its output, like with video games in general, can be cognitively reduced to its basic mechanics

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbQbiK5oQXI

      Elaborate speech by Stephanie Morgan on why Gamification sucks.

  7. Feb 2017
    1. nteraction designers try to impose structures upon human action by shaping coercive environments where people are punished if they do things the “wrong way” and by hiding or not providing options for changing artifact adaptations. Interaction design mediates human agency and power, but if it does not provide choices for action, there is no room for ethics: people act based on conditions, not on considerations of what should be done.

      Point on reward & punishment feedback is a really good point, darkpatterns comes to mind.

      If IxD does not provide choices for action, there is no room for ethics: People act based on conditions, not on considerations of what should be done

      This reactive behaviour is what UX practioners of gamification feel proud to do. It's disgusting to see them feel proud doing it, how come they feel no remorse doing it?. I too will have to do it in the near future, but I won't fucking have a glitter in my eye and a wide smile across my face doing it.

  8. Sep 2016
    1. Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 2K and Firaxis Games Partner with GlassLab Inc., to Bring CivilizationEDU to High Schools Throughout North America in 2017
  9. Apr 2016
  10. Feb 2016
    1. gamification is marketing bullshit, invented by consultants as a means to capture the wild, coveted beast that is videogames and to domesticate it for use in the grey, hopeless wasteland of big business, where bullshit already reigns anyway.

      Q: What is the definition of the "Gamification" that he's talking about?

      parents & teachers are a couple of examples of people who've been using strategies or tricks if you will that fall under "gamification" as I understand it to motivate children to learn or to do something in a more fun way

  11. Aug 2015
  12. Jul 2015
    1. “Real-time data and quantitative benchmarks are the reason why gamers get consistently better at virtually any game they play: their performance is consistently measured and reflected back to them, with advancing progress bars, points, levels, and achievements. It’s easy for players to see exactly how and when they’re making progress. This kind of instantaneous, positive feedback drives players to try harder and to succeed at more difficult challenges. That’s why it’s worth considering making things we already love more gamelike. It can make us better at them, and help us set our sights higher.” (Jane McGonigal, Reality is Broken)

      Full book title: Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.