35 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
  2. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. While the term “mobilization system” is new, the underlying ICT techniques have beenexplored for at least a decade or two, under labels such as “persuasive technology”, “collaborativetechnology”, “user experience”, and “gamification”. This paper will first review a number of suchexisting approaches and then try to distill their common core in the form of a list of mobilizationprinciples. Finally, we will sketch both potential benefits and dangers of a more systematic andwidespread application of mobilization systems.

      Examples of existing types of mobilization systems: 1. Persuasive technology 2. collaborative technology 3. user experience 4. gamification

  3. May 2022
    1. A guiding principle will be to make the hyper-response as not only fun and enjoyable as possible but also meaningful via a vibrant grand narrative approach that connects the mission to conceptions of identity, values, and evolving worldviews.

      Gamification will play a critical role to tap into the human psychology that will encourage proactive action. Bend-the-Curve is the glocal game proposed as a way to mobilize ordinary citizens aggregate community scale response teams.

      As part of this gamification, a private Transform application within the public and open Indyweb can facilitate individual inner transformation, synchronize that to individual outer (behavior) transformation and synchronize that to collective inner and outer transformation at the respective community collective scale and finally aggregating all community impacts, to the global collective transformation scale. Built in data privacy of the Indyweb insures that everyone can contribute data to the aggregator in a completely anonymous way. All of this is designed to operationalize Donella Meadow's insight that inner transformation of worldviews, paradigms and value systems is the most powerful of all leverage points.

    2. For four years, an accelerated and intensive global effort will be made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and restore ecological stability. It will be “fast and furious” because it will involve startup action as well as implementation. It is focused on the remaining “low-hanging fruit” for fastest global reductions

      The Tipping Point Festival can introduce the Bend-the-Curve (BtC) gamification to engage as many cities, towns, rural communities and bioregions as possible. A 3 year research program to dis-aggregate planetary boundaries can allocate a fairshare of local biophysical targets each city, town, rural community and bioregion must aim to achieve if we as a civilization are to meet the 1.5 deg C target, as well as other Anthropocene and planetary boundary targets.

      Doughnut economic framework can be adopted immediately and educated across all communities to plant seeds of local change actor chapters who can start their own local doughnut economies and begin reshaping their local economy into circular bio WEconomies.

      When the dis-aggregated planetary boundary metrics are available, then each community can adopt and aim to bend their local curve, in order that we altogether bend the global curves back to a safe operating space.

      it may be questionable whether we are able to develop highly accurate targets, but even if we are close enough, the greater value is to allow citizens to have a tangible and compelling and measurable reason to work together, organize and mitigate our human impacts in a systematic way. In this way, we can expose the hyperthreat by breaking it down into digestable, identifiable pieces that are cognitively more accessible and can lodge into the salience landscape of the individuals of a community.

    1. He and his fellow bot creators had been asking themselves over the years, “what do we do when the platform [Twitter] becomes unfriendly for bots?”

      There's some odd irony in this quote. Kazemi indicates that Twitter was unfriendly for bots, but he should be specific that it's unfriendly for non-corporately owned bots. One could argue that much of the interaction on Twitter is spurred by the primary bot on the service: the algorithmic feed (bot) that spurs people to like, retweet, and interact with more content and thus keeping them on the platform for longer.

  4. Apr 2022
    1. So be curious. Be creative. But don't take it too seriously. Learn to like technology, not be afraid of it.

      For curiosity and creativity. To like technology, not be afraid of it. Useful or less useful, to change the world or not. Technology is everywhere, that's why we should learn about it.

  5. Feb 2022
    1. At its most extreme, districts have implemented entirely scripted lessons for teachers to recite. It is commonplace to visit an educational conference and be sold on the idea of entirely pre-made lessons. They're "teacher-proof."

      again, like gamification. teacher-proof! Epic engagement at the drop of a hat!

    2. As a result, the school feels like they've made change through new buzzwords and professional development, but the end result feels and looks really similar to what was in place before

      sounds like #gamification then!

  6. Sep 2021
    1. "The current results have been established due to two test phases with a very small amount of payed testers, and thus can not enable to elaborate the total waste heat potentials in Vienna and Graz."

  7. May 2021
    1. It's important to know when gamification will work and be beneficial and to know when it may be harmful.

    2. Amazon seems to understand this: They’ve kept their gamification program entirely optional so employees who enjoy it can use it, but it isn’t imposed on anyone.

      Optional gamification can be a useful too.

    3. What matters most is how the people playing the game feel about it.

      Gamification may only work if the people who are playing the game understand it, enjoy it, and participate.

    4. The researchers had asked everyone in their game a set of questions: Did people follow the game? Did they understand the rules? Did they think it was fair? These questions were designed to measure which salespeople had “entered the magic circle,” meaning that they agreed to be bound by the game’s rules rather than the normal rules that ordinarily guide their work. After all, if people haven’t entered a game mentally, there’s no real point to it.Sure enough, the salespeople who felt that the basketball game was a load of baloney actually felt worse about work after the game was introduced, and their sales performance declined slightly. The game benefited only the salespeople who had fully bought into it—they became significantly more upbeat at work.

      Ethan Mollick and Nancy Rothbard experiment https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2277103 about gamification in a sales setting shows that gamification only works for those who buy into it.

      Is this similar to ideas like the placebo effect or potentially for cases like Eastern Medicine where one might need to buy into it for the effects to matter to them?

    5. The volunteers who received recognition for their efforts were 20 percent more likely to volunteer for Wikipedia again in the following month and 13 percent more likely than those who earned no praise to be active on Wikipedia a year later.

      Jana Gallus, an economist studying for her doctorate at the University of Zurich ran a test on gamification of Wikipedia that showed a 20 percent jump in volunteerism over a month and 13 percent over a control for a year.

  8. Feb 2021
  9. Oct 2020
    1. Takentogether,theresultsofthissystematicreviewsuggestthatgamificationcanincreaseengagementinonlineprograms,andenhancerelatedoutcomes,suchaslearningandpossiblyhealthbehaviour.Mostresearchtodatehasevaluatedtheimpactofmultiplegamificationfea-turesusedincombination.Preliminaryevidencesuggeststhatleaderboardsmaybea particu-larlyusefulformofgamificationtoincreaseengagement.It appearsthattheefficacyofgamificationforincreasingengagementmayhavea timeeffect,witha clearpositiveimpactinstudiesconductingactivitiesina singlesitting,withresultsmoremixedforstudiesexamininggamificationandengagementovera sustainedperiod

      Gamification, that is, adding game features to an otherwise dry college course, helped get students engaged. Leaderboards were more effective than badges and points and for a longer time. People did seem to lose interest in the game after a while. 8/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. While many blogs get dozens or hundreds of visitors, Searls' site attracts thousands. "I partly don't want to care what the number is," he says. "I used to work in broadcasting, where everyone was obsessed by that. I don't want an audience. I feel I'm writing stuff that's part of a conversation. Conversations don't have audiences."

      Social media has completely ignored this sort of sentiment and gamified and psychoanalyzed it's way into the polar opposite direction all for the sake of "engagement", clicks, data gathering, and advertising.

  10. Dec 2019
    1. Games are fantastic at motivating mundane activity—how else can you explain all that time you've spent on mindless fetch quests? Habitica, formerly known as HabitRPG, tries to use principles from game design to motivate you to get things done, and it's remarkably effective
  11. Mar 2019
    1. 7 Gamification Strategies for Corporate Training

      This article by the Tech Edvocate discusses seven ways to gamify corporate training. I find this personally important because I often use games to teach my adult learners about some of the most boring topics. (For instance, I'm currently creating training to explain the theory and calculations behind a very complex distribution management software tool. Imagine explaining how a calculator works to provide correct answers to math equations, then multiply that a few times. It's tough.) According to this article, in order to gamify, instructors can specify learning objectives, use reward systems, incorporate social interaction, and challenge learners to make gamified learning successful. 8/10

    1. 5 technology enabled learning trends in 2017 This article was produced by a credible publisher and is included here because it points to the need for both mobile learning and micro learning. The authors assert but do not provide data for the increasing need for microlearning. This form of learning is said to be important because it is associated with the real world. Rating 4/5

    1. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

  12. Nov 2018
    1. How Technology can Shape Adult Education

      The author provides a brief overview of methods that technology can be used in adult education. Specifically, gamification and virtual reality are described to be ways to make adult education fun and interactive. Rating: 4/5

  13. Jul 2018
    1. I’m thinking about video games, and how I learn playing them.

      Important anecdote for thinking about "gamification". The idea that games produce their own learning, without social structures or personal reflection processes, is over-simplistic.

      (Sidebar: a colleague once said to me "Gamification means making a (crummy) game. I want to make good games with my students.")

  14. Aug 2017
  15. Jun 2017
    1. he biggest problem with gamification is that its output, like with video games in general, can be cognitively reduced to its basic mechanics

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbQbiK5oQXI

      Elaborate speech by Stephanie Morgan on why Gamification sucks.

  16. Feb 2017
    1. nteraction designers try to impose structures upon human action by shaping coercive environments where people are punished if they do things the “wrong way” and by hiding or not providing options for changing artifact adaptations. Interaction design mediates human agency and power, but if it does not provide choices for action, there is no room for ethics: people act based on conditions, not on considerations of what should be done.

      Point on reward & punishment feedback is a really good point, darkpatterns comes to mind.

      If IxD does not provide choices for action, there is no room for ethics: People act based on conditions, not on considerations of what should be done

      This reactive behaviour is what UX practioners of gamification feel proud to do. It's disgusting to see them feel proud doing it, how come they feel no remorse doing it?. I too will have to do it in the near future, but I won't fucking have a glitter in my eye and a wide smile across my face doing it.

  17. Sep 2016
    1. Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 2K and Firaxis Games Partner with GlassLab Inc., to Bring CivilizationEDU to High Schools Throughout North America in 2017
  18. Apr 2016
  19. Feb 2016
    1. gamification is marketing bullshit, invented by consultants as a means to capture the wild, coveted beast that is videogames and to domesticate it for use in the grey, hopeless wasteland of big business, where bullshit already reigns anyway.

      Q: What is the definition of the "Gamification" that he's talking about?

      parents & teachers are a couple of examples of people who've been using strategies or tricks if you will that fall under "gamification" as I understand it to motivate children to learn or to do something in a more fun way

  20. Aug 2015
  21. Jul 2015
    1. “Real-time data and quantitative benchmarks are the reason why gamers get consistently better at virtually any game they play: their performance is consistently measured and reflected back to them, with advancing progress bars, points, levels, and achievements. It’s easy for players to see exactly how and when they’re making progress. This kind of instantaneous, positive feedback drives players to try harder and to succeed at more difficult challenges. That’s why it’s worth considering making things we already love more gamelike. It can make us better at them, and help us set our sights higher.” (Jane McGonigal, Reality is Broken)

      Full book title: Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.