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  1. Jul 2022
  2. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. tap into real needs (e.g. combating the dangers of obesity)• present clear goals (e.g. realistic weight targets)• make it easy to do what is needed (e.g. prepare healthy meals)• give feedback about the progress made so far (e.g. compare your present weight with yourinitial and ideal weights)• provide clear visualizations of potential means or ends, so that users can easily imagine theeffect of their future actions (e.g. a computer-generated photo of how you would look afterlosing all that weight)• make use of social pressure (e.g. by pointing out the achievements of others)• provide timely triggers to stimulate their users to do something (e.g. alarms to remind you toexercise)

      Persuasive technology ways to extend our will

    2. While the term “mobilization system” is new, the underlying ICT techniques have beenexplored for at least a decade or two, under labels such as “persuasive technology”, “collaborativetechnology”, “user experience”, and “gamification”. This paper will first review a number of suchexisting approaches and then try to distill their common core in the form of a list of mobilizationprinciples. Finally, we will sketch both potential benefits and dangers of a more systematic andwidespread application of mobilization systems.

      Examples of existing types of mobilization systems: 1. Persuasive technology 2. collaborative technology 3. user experience 4. gamification