54 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. DOB

      Dimethoxybromoamphetamine (DOB), also known as brolamfetamine (INN)[1] and bromo-DMA, is a psychedelic drug and substituted amphetamine of the phenethylamine class of compounds. DOB was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin in 1967.

      Its synthesis and effects are documented in Shulgin's book PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story.

  2. Dec 2018
  3. Nov 2018
    1. In addition to the literature review, we have collaborated with Dr. David Gaertner, instructor in the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program at the University of British Columbia, on a Wikipedia gap analysis assignment in FNIS 220: Representation and Indigenous Cultural Politics. The gap analysis assignment focuses on how knowledge systems like Wikipedia support or fail to provide a space for inclusive representation of Indigenous culture and identity. We offered a workshop in the FNIS 220 class that focused on how knowledge is constructed in traditional (e.g. library) and open knowledge (e.g. Wikipedia) systems, how to critically analyze who is creating information, the context of the creation process, and how information is made accessible in these spaces. In a second workshop, students took those analyses and worked in small groups to edit Wikipedia to improve Indigenous articles.

      This is a fantastic case study to explore CIL issues with.

  4. Oct 2018
    1. They pose a great opportunity for Wikimedia projects such as Wikipedia to work efficiently, even as they are flooded with new edits.

      Bots contributing to new edits.

  5. Sep 2018
  6. Jul 2018
  7. Apr 2018
    1. ConvexHull

      In mathematics, the convex hull or convex envelope of a set X of points in the Euclidean plane or in a Euclidean space (or, more generally, in an affine space over the reals) is the smallest convex set that contains X. For instance, when X is a bounded subset of the plane, the convex hull may be visualized as the shape enclosed by a rubber band stretched around X. -Wikipedia

  8. Jan 2018
    1. Wikipedia's Verifiability policy requires inline citations for any material challenged or likely to be challenged, and for all quotations, anywhere in article space.

      For quotations, we can do better than pointing to containing documents. We can use annotations to point directly to quotes.

  9. Dec 2017
    1. More intense use of Wikipediapolicies by politically diverse teams

      I wonder how their commitment to partisanship compares to their commitment to Wikipedia.

  10. Nov 2017
    1. It is no wonder that a significant number of college professors disallow reference to Wikipedia as a “reliable” source of information.

      Actually, this is more because study at this level would expect the students to dig deeper than an overview on a topic. The references section, and discussion page, for an article on Wikipedia are often a very good starting point.

  11. Sep 2017
  12. Jul 2017
    1. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. Please search for Oil sands/ in Wikipedia to check for alternative titles or spellings.

      Interesting that a Wiki page that did not exist was included in the collection.

  13. Apr 2017
    1. hat Velterop essentially does is to generalize the Wikipedia implementation of distributed contributions by linking it to the semantic web

      Fascinating. Mark this for followup.

  14. Feb 2017
    1. Through the Wikipedia Library program, the encyclopedia’s editors have free access to a collection of over 80,000 unique periodicals, like journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, pamphlets, and series, in addition to an untallyable number of books.

      What a resource!

    1. University of Edinburgh has hired a Wikimedian-in-residenc

      should every institution have an "open knowledge officer"?

    1. Although anonymous comments are "six times more likely to be an attack," they represent less than half of all attacks on Wikipedia. "Similarly, less than half of attacks come from users with little prior participation," the researchers write in their paper. "Perhaps surprisingly, approximately 30% of attacks come from registered users with over a 100 contributions." In other words, a third of all personal attacks come from regular Wikipedia editors who contribute several edits per month. Personal attacks seem to be baked into Wikipedia culture.

      Personal attacks come from frequent editors.

  15. Aug 2016
  16. Jun 2016
    1. a collection of Wikipedias

      FWIW, PLOS tried this with PLOS Currents. It didn't get much traction, but I think there were some good use cases around rapid communications for disease outbreaks.

  17. Apr 2016
    1. One thing I held on to during fedwiki was that it wasn’t intended to be wikipedia, and to me that meant it wasn’t intended to produce articles so much as to sustain and connect ideas in formation that might find their way into article-like things on other platforms.
  18. Mar 2016
    1. the disregard for Wikipedia appears to be on the de-cline,

      True. Teachers used to "ban" Wikipedia as a source, but really Bizup would argue that no good or bad source exists; only well-used or poorly used sources exist. Wikipedia works well for Background information. And, furthermore, Wikipedia probably is more up-to-date than old encyclopedias for obvious reasons.

  19. Jan 2016
  20. Dec 2015
    1. ‘quality of life’

      (QOL)- general well being of individuals and societies. QOL has a wide range of contexts including fields of international development, healthcare, politics, and employment (Google/Wikipedia)

  21. Oct 2015
    1. its definition varies from author to author

      Wikipedia should give an overview but it is also biased toward article authors. The current article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge_Organization_Systems is very brief and the article on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conceptual_system is mixed with articles about KOS in some languages. See https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q6423319 and https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3622126 in Wikidata.

  22. Sep 2015
    1. SOTL necessarily builds on many past traditions in higher education, including classroom and program assessment, K-12 action research, the reflective practice movement, peer review of teaching, traditional educational research, and faculty development efforts to enhance teaching and learning. Terms closely related to the scholarship of teaching and learning are good teaching (that which promotes student learning and desired outcomes and is recognized by student satisfaction, peer review, etc.) and scholarly teaching (in which teaching is regarded as an area of study and the teaching and learning knowledge base is regarded as an additional discipline in which to develop expertise).

      Potential rewrite:

      SOTL builds on many past traditions in higher education, including classroom and program assessment, K-12 action research, the reflective practice movement, peer review of teaching, traditional educational research, and faculty development efforts. While recognizing the value of "good teaching" (teaching as effective practice), it argues for the importance of "scholarly teaching" as well. In scholarly teaching, the teacher not only learns teaching as a practice, but as a scholarly discipline as well, one to which they can become a productive contributor.

    2. movement

      Right word? Perhaps "growing practice" in education instead?

  23. Aug 2015
  24. Jul 2015
    1. Davis, Allison P. "Sheila Heti on Drinking Her Way to a Child's-Eye View" from Department of Corrections in The Cut July 16, 2015 annotation as a correction to existing online resources such as Wikipedia

    1. Wikipedia:Bildrechte

      Hintergrundinformationen zu den Bildrechten in Wikipedia-Projekten

  25. Apr 2015
    1. Do your research elsewhere.

      Again, not bad advice, but for the wrong reasons.

      Wikipedia is a good starting point and a great place to get a reasonably reliable overview. The real resource that Wikipedia provides is the Citations and References sections. These are the sources for the detail in the article and recommended further reading to get to the guts of what you're researching.

      Other sources are always recommended. More reliable references are always a good thing and being able to get them cited in a Wikipedia article is a good way of giving extra validation given the process required to get something added to an article. It makes the Wikipedia article better and will cause the source article to appear higher in search results also.

    2. Never link to Wikipedia from your website.

      This is a fair thing to ask of people. The explanation is flawed and the advise is a little too firm but in general it is not bad.

      If you are referencing a general topic linking to Wikipedia is fine.

      If you are referencing a specific thing you should link to the source material rather than a general article. Chances are reasonably good that if your source material is well researched you could get it added to the sources in the Wikipedia article and maybe even update the general article too.

      Wikipedia has rules around editing that ensure factually correct information makes it through. Editing can be challenging but if you adhere to these editing can be quite rewarding.

    1. The first female commanding officer of a helicopter squadron at RAF Shawbury, Becky Frater, started work. The squadron is 705 Naval Air Squadron (NAS), one of the two basic helicopter training squadrons at the Defence Helicopter Flying School (DHFS) at RAF Shawbury.[159]

      Becky Frater needs her own page.

  26. Feb 2015
  27. Feb 2014
    1. First he runs through an encyclopedia, finds an interesting but sketchy article

      The first reference to Wikipedia?! :)

  28. Dec 2013
    1. “Stanley Fish wrote…that digital humanities is concerned with ‘matters of statistical frequency and pattern,’ and summarized digital humanities methodology as ‘first you run the numbers, and then you see if they prompt an interpretive hypothesis.’”

      Fish is an interesting fellow. Here's the opening line from his Wikipedia entry: Stanley Eugene Fish (born April 19, 1938) is an American literary theorist, legal scholar, author and public intellectual. He is currently the Floerscheimer Distinguished Professor of Law at Cardozo Law School in New York City. "

  29. Oct 2013