24 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
  2. Oct 2022
    1. The firefox hypothes.is bookmarklet I use doesn’t seem to play nice with archive.org. There’s another I haven’t tested yet.

      I noticed the same thing. Does hypothes.is work with the Internet Archive in any scenario? I think it's a great tool and concept, but link rot limits it compared to saving pages and annotations locally (my preferred solution for that is Mark-It to turn a page into markdown or SingeFile to turn it into HTML and then adding highlights).

  3. Aug 2022
    1. The Tegos Tapes is an interesting example of an obscure and heretofore unreleased Vangelis soundtrack unknown by many of even his most devoted fans.The Tegos Tapes were produced originally by the Greek medical professional Dr. Stergios Tegos, and contain educational examples of his microneurosurgery work. This VHS set of tapes was not intended for general release to the Public as these training videos were mainly intended for student surgeons in training or offered to other microneurosurgeons via Dr. Tegos exclusively.Dr. Tegos asked his close friend Vangelis to create a background soundtrack to accompany these videos and Vangelis agreed, composing nearly 8 hours of some of his more pleasing and ambient music. Dr. Tegos thought that a background musical score composed and performed by Vangelis himself would ease the monotony and dryness of the subject matter and help the viewer to focus more effectively.
  4. Jul 2022
    1. National Emergency Library

      Internet Archive's National Emergency Library

      Also not CDL: no limit on simultaneous use, author opt-out, book must have been published more than 5 years prior.

  5. Jun 2022
    1. Even if the original webpage disappears, you can often use this informationto locate an archived version using the Wayback Machine, a project of theInternet Archive that preserves a record of websites: https://archive.org/web/.

      It would be useful to suggest here:

      Ideally one's note taking applications would automatically archive web pages to the Internet Archive as you take notes from them. This means that if they should disappear in the future, you'd have recourse to a useful and workable back up.

    1. We write on behalf of plaintiffs Hachette Book Group, Inc., HarperCollins PublishersLLC, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and Penguin Random House LLC (the “Plaintiffs”) to request apre-motion summary judgment conference pursuant to Individual Practice 2(B).

      Purpose of Letter

    1. I write on behalf of Defendant Internet Archive pursuant to Paragraph 2-B of Your Honor’s IndividualPractices to request a pre-motion conference on a motion for summary judgment in the above matter.

      A letter from the law firm representing the Internet Archives that summarizes the four-point fair use argument and details the extraordinary circumstances behind the the IA's National Emergency Library.

      Hachette Book Group, Inc. et al. v. Internet Archive, Case No. 1:20-CV-04160-JGK

      RECAP's archive of the docket from PACER

  6. May 2022
  7. Nov 2021
  8. Oct 2021
  9. Jul 2021
    1. A solid overview article about the architectural deficiencies of the web for long term archival and access as well as some ideas for fixing the issue and a plea to attempt to make things better for the future.

    2. Suppose Google were to change what’s on that page, or reorganize its website anytime between when I’m writing this article and when you’re reading it, eliminating it entirely. Changing what’s there would be an example of content drift; eliminating it entirely is known as link rot.

      We don't talk about content drift very much. I like that some sites, particularly wiki sites, actually document their content drift in diffs and surface that information directly to the user. Why don't we do this for more websites? The Wayback machine also has this sort of feature.

  10. Jun 2021
    1. For example, the Wikipedia article on Martin Luther King, Jr cites the book To Redeem the Soul of America, by Adam Fairclough. That citation now links directly to page 299 inside the digital version of the book provided by the Internet Archive. There are 66 cited and linked books on that article alone. 

      I'd love to have a commonplace book robot that would do this sort of linking process within it for me. In the meanwhile, I continue to plod along.

      This article was referenced today at [[I Annotate 2021]] by [[Mark Graham]].

  11. Jan 2021
    1. Ever since a certain car salesman tweeted “Use Signal”

      I've seen this linking pattern once or twice before in the wild. This is an obvious subtweet of Elon Musk, but the link is an archived version of a Tweet that is mirrored through Nitter. This is done to ensure that the original Tweet link is as heavily demoted as possible.

  12. Nov 2020
  13. Oct 2020
    1. every page on my blog contains a link to its archive in the page footer. This ensures that you can not only browse the latest version of all of my blog articles in case of a server breakdown. This also enables you to browse all previous version, probably changed over time. Go ahead, try a few "Archive" links of my articles. If any of my articles start with an "Updates:" section, you know for sure that there are older versions accessible via the Internet Archive.

      This is an interesting pattern. How could one make this more obvious from a uI perspective?

  14. Sep 2020
    1. The Chelicerae popped up on the occasional paranormal site or edgy message board, each time accompanied by a now-defunct link. According to those who followed such things, all you had to do was start a new thread as a Guest, something Greg had been instructed to make sure was possible, and the title of that thread should be the name of someone you want dead. As the stories went, you would receive a reply almost immediately, and it would simply ask you for a story. You would have to write out, and post, in full, a horrible event that had happened to you, or someone that you loved. All the instructions were very clear that the target would only die, if the account satisfied the “Story-spinner.” None of them made any mention of what would happen if it did not.
  15. Apr 2020
  16. Dec 2019
    1. For most of my bookmarks, likes, reads, etc. I use a plugin that scrapes my post and saves a copy of the contents of all the URLs on my page to the Internet Archive so that even in the event of a site death, a copy of the content is saved for me for a later date.

      Chris, I was wondering what plugin you use to store copies of the links to Archive.org?

    1. One of the questions that came up during the SPLOT workshop is if there’s a SPLOT for podcasting, which reminded me of this post Adam Croom wrote a while back about his podcasting workflow: “My Podcasting Workflow with Amazon S3.” . We’re always on the look-out for new SPLOTs to bring to the Reclaim masses, and it would be cool to have an example that moves beyond WordPress just to make the point a SPLOT is not limited to WordPress (as much as we love it) —so maybe Adam and I can get the band back together

      I just outlined a tiny and relatively minimal/free way to host and create a podcast feed last night: https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/17/55761877/

      I wonder if this could be used to create a SPLOT that isn't WordPress based potentially using APIs from the Internet Archive and Huffduffer? WordPress-based infrastructure could be used to create it certainly and aggregation could be done around tags. It looks like the Huffduffer username SPLOT is available.

  17. Oct 2019