936 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Twitter threads gave illness a name and a face, grounding the dread in particular bodies and disparate — if often overlapping — experiences. They placed these experiences in history, creating an archive of disease, fear, rage, and hope that will persist even as these feelings — and some of these people — have passed.

      Archives are only worth their weight in water if interested parties can find what they're looking for. When artifacts aren't gathered and curated into public-facing unities or collections, then history elides them until further notice. These threads are still floating in the sprawl of the Twitterverse, placed into history and drowned out by an ocean of pure, frantic noise. What this piece makes evident to me is the need for restoration: that they need to be resurfaced, preserved, made visible again.

  2. Jan 2021
  3. Dec 2020
    1. Web Development Companies of USA

      Your business website will climb the stairway to success once you develop it in the correct way. A great website is all about being responsive,scalable, robust and give superior user experience to the customers.So to help you with a right technology partner for your website designing & development requirement, we have prepared the report of top web developers in the USA..

    1. class Session extends Map { set(id, value) { if (typeof value === 'object') value = JSON.stringify(value); sessionStorage.setItem(id, value); } get(id) { const value = sessionStorage.getItem(id); try { return JSON.parse(value); } catch (e) { return value; } } }
    2. I think that the webStorage is one of the most exciting improvement of the new web. But save only strings in the value key-map I think is a limitation.
    1. Andrew Bosworth, one of Facebook’s longtime executives, has compared Facebook to sugar—in that it is “delicious” but best enjoyed in moderation. In a memo originally posted to Facebook’s internal network last year, he argued for a philosophy of personal responsibility. “My grandfather took such a stance towards bacon and I admired him for it,” Bosworth wrote. “And social media is likely much less fatal than bacon.”

      Another example of comparing social media and food.

    2. Facebook’s stated mission—to make the world more open and connected—

      If they were truly serious about the connectedness part, they would implement the Webmention spec and microformats, or something just like it, but open and standardized.

    1. A perfect web application idea must be a combination of functionalities and amazing designing elements. To make it more clear, let us first discuss what makes a difference between a great web application and an average one.

      it is essential that your web app idea is appropriate in order to achieve your targeted goals. Not only focus on the designing part of your web application, but seamless backend development is important.

    1. Svelte components are a thin layer over the DOM and naturally expose the web platform. Coding in Svelte feels like I’m moving with the grain of the web.
    1. Serving pages and assets as pre-generated files allows read-only hosting reducing attack vectors even further. Meanwhile dynamic tools and services can be provided by vendors with teams dedicated to securing their specific systems and providing high levels of service.
    1. Because Jamstack projects don’t rely on server-side code, they can be distributed instead of living on a single server. Serving directly from a CDN unlocks speeds and performance that can’t be beat. The more of your app you can push to the edge, the better the user experience.
    2. Because Jamstack markup is prebuilt, content changes won’t go live until you run another build.
    1. Better PerformanceWhy wait for pages to build on the fly when you can generate them at deploy time? When it comes to minimizing the time to first byte, nothing beats pre-built files served over a CDN.
  4. Nov 2020
    1. I'm not familiar with Svelte. But the UI itself is handled in a custom canvas on mobile (and probably Desktop?) Though, on the web, it is HTML and CSS.
    2. Unfortunately it is not just the semantic that is broken. There are lot of things.For example if you look at some of the examples (https://flutter.github.io/samples/#/) - you can see that indeed there are some div and p tags but it is not entirely normal DOM elements. For example you can't even select text anywhere on the screen. And there are more and more little things like that.Just to be clear - Flutter for web is great, I'm happy it exists, but it is not comparable to React/Vue or Svelte.IMO Flutter for web is good to post live examples of Flutter code or maybe some last-minute-boss-request to make a web version of existing app, but for not for full-blown web app. :)
    1. They are often cited as the first website to feature banner ads.

      If, indeed, Wired invented the banner ad, it is also worth mentioning that wired.com was one of the last websites to be rendered completely unusable by them (when it was still running on the old CMS. idk about now.)

      I love @LaurenGoode and find her insight very worthwhile even in this format, but I really wish the platform on which it now resides (Wired's CMS) wasn't *completely* and *entirely* broken. Chorus should've been a package deal. https://t.co/OweeG30jR6

      — ※ David Blue ※ (@NeoYokel) July 13, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    1. When writing copy for buttons, make sure that you keep consistency.
    2. Make sure the label colour stands out against the button fill. You can check using http://accessible-colors.com/. Always make sure that your colours meet the AAA requirements.
    3. Text links are a very simple button type.

      Eh? I didn't know links were considered buttons. I'm not sure I totally agree understand, but it's not outrageous either...

      Update: Okay, I guess when you put an outline around it (like they directly below this paragraph), and even more if you put an icon with it (like they did further down; https://hyp.is/DZTZzi6fEeuu65uvQJ9W1Q/uxdesign.cc/ui-cheat-sheets-buttons-7329ed9d6112), the link looks like more like a button.

      But (and I think this is their point) it is what it is because of how it's used and not how it's styled: it should be the same thing (a button) whether or not it has an outline.

    4. Some text links may have an icon with them.
    1. Capacitor's origins lie in Ionic's mission to provide a holistic framework for developing hybrid apps—apps that run on mobile devices, on desktops, and in the browser. It does not only replace Apache Cordova as a “bridge” to native platform access in new Ionic projects but also “provides a consistent, web-focused set of APIs”.
    2. Capacitor is a framework that provides developers a coherent API set to access various features on different platforms. By doing so, it also simplifies using those features. Especially for web APIs that are hard to use or require multiple steps to set them up, Capacitor provides an easy-to-use interface.
    1. How to Choose a Technology Stack For Web Applications: Tips To Follow

      It is difficult to underestimate the impact of a properly chosen web tech stack on the project's general success. Read this article to learn how to choose a web development stack.

    1. We convene the Decentralized Web Summit, dedicated to creating the Web we want and the Web we deserve. A Web that is private, safe and locked open for good.
    1. these platforms aim to provide experiences “that people want to use that works as much as possible as they expect, but which is backed up by better values and technology.”

      This is an interesting statement of how this new social media should work.

  5. blog.spencermounta.in blog.spencermounta.in
    1. The 2000's utopian dream for computer programs was the ‘semantic web’- which for me is still a little raw to talk about.

      believe! work for it!

      it's remarkable to me how short-lived the attention is, how few rally, how much development is left up to the few remote entities.

      the semantic web, to me, is about decomposing the page into useful components, that have their own meaning distinct from the big page. that's the core start. there's a ton of semantic reasoning & other shit, academia has a strong hold on the semantic web it feels like. but the field is open. anyone can begin building new experiences any day that fulfill this vision. figuring out how to build a scalable practice around it is step 2. thusfar no one has made much headway on step 1 though!

      let some of the other points in this writeup characterize the lessons for how we might build scaleably, step 2. but focus on step 1? maybe?

    1. The websites of today are primarily built with efficiency and usefulness in mind, but in turn, they often lack the creativity, playfulness, and dedication that make a site stand out and a joy to interact with.

      imo there's a kind of fetishistic personalization/craftiness argument at play here, and it's not entirely wrong, but it misses the much larger trend, the thing that's really shifting focus. the thing that actually matters, today, is that the cloud let's us retain, persist, share, & interact with both the already present medium, but also in a way that permits us to bring our selves, retain, persist share & interact with the many folk that dwell & pass through. the write up here is interesting, but it still speaks to me of the solitary, lone, solo experience, of me, the author, crafting something niche & creative, & ignores the wider relevance that has taken wing underneath our feat.

      the web, once, was reputed as a place of interconnection, of links, between systems. if you want an interesting web, imo, you need to be letting people seed more & interesting interconnectivities across sites. let people play with your web. create intertwingularities, join points, where other experiences, other systems, can see yours, touch yours, manipulate yours. weave a wider web, connect better, allow others more powers to harness yours.

      the challenge on this page, to design into interestingness, is a false song, is tale of personal greatness that ignores the interconnected greatness that is the wider world web, and how we can make ourselves resources than can be remixed and recycles and iterated upon freely, elevating our small selves into pieces of the greater ongoing rolling ensemble of our times..

  6. Oct 2020
    1. Some apps are free to download while some charge money. This is the simplest revenue model that you can go with. Create an exceptional app and charge a one-time fee or a yearly subscription for the app

      There are several ways to monetize an app. It all depends on the financial conditions and the general mindset of your target audience. By studying your audience, you’ll find the best way to make money from your app idea.

    1. If you are exploring ideas to start a cryptocurrency business in 2020 or 2021, you have definitely made a daring yet excellent choice. 

      Cryptocurrency is digital money that is developed using the most complex technology, called Blockchain. And, bitcoin is the first-ever developed digital currency that created a pathway for today’s “cryptocurrency” regime.

    1. 2.0 tools for learning human histology by First year MBBS students and thus make them aware of the features of these

      Medical research students Web 2.0 tools

    1. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences 1 (2009) 478–482Available online at www.sciencedirect.comWorld Conference on Educational Sciences 2009 To use or not to use web 2.0 in higher education? Gabriela Grosseck* West University of Timisoara, 4 Bd. C. Coposu, office 029, 300223 Timisoara, Romania Received October 8, 2008; revised December 16, 2008; accepted January 4, 2009 Abstract Web 2.0 has been, during the last years, one of the most fashionable words for a whole range of evolutions regarding the Internet. Although it was identified by the current analysts as the key technology for the next decade, the actors from the educational field do not really know what Web 2.0 means. Since the author started to explore and use Web 2.0 technologies in her own development/improvement, she has been intrigued by their potential and, especially, by the possibility of integrating them in education and in particular in the teaching activity. The purpose of this paper is both to promote scholarly inquiry about the need of a new type a pedagogy (Web 2.0 based) and the development / adoption of best practice in teaching and learning with web 2.0 in higher education (HE). The article main objectives are: • to introduce theoretical aspects of using Web 2.0 technologies in higher education • to present models of integrating Web 2.0 technologies in teaching, learning and assessment • to identify the potential benefits of these technologies as well as to highlight some of the problematic issues / barriers encountered, surrounding the pedagogical use of Web 2.0 in higher education • to propose an agenda for future research, and to develop pedagogy 2.0 scenarios for HE sector. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Web 2.0; e-learning; higher education; social artifacts. 1. Insight

      Great research article to support my paper on topic of Web 2.0 technology.

    1. purpose of this section is to discuss the influence of Web 2.0 technologies on online collaboration based on different learning theories and modes

      This is fitting for my research paper which monitors this topic.

    1. This useful website provides a host of tools plus a description. 10 out of 10

    2. The following list includes free tools that you can use to stay on top of current events, including headlines and blogs.

      Resources that a teacher can never have enough of. I have used Animoto among others.

    1. found. The PST concern was most intense in the self-concern stage and then fluctuated from task-concern to impact-concern within a small range. Findings of the study provide valuable insights for personalising teacher education as to how levels of concern, self-efficacy for teaching, teacher knowledge and demographics influence the change process required for Web 2.0 integration in instruction.

      Perceptions even about technology matter.I am interested in learning about as many factors that contribute to adult learning about Wrb 2.0 tools

  7. react-spectrum.adobe.com react-spectrum.adobe.com
    1. Sometimes you might need to use an element other than a native <button>. useButton supports this via the elementType prop. When used with an element other than a native button, useButton automatically applies the necessary ARIA roles and attributes to ensure that the element is exposed to assistive technology as a button.
    1. Informal learning in work environments: training with the Social Web in the workplace.

      Garcia-Penalvo, F. J., Colomo-Palacios, R., & Lytras, M. D. (2012). Informal Learning in Work Environments: Training with the Social Web in the Workplace. Behaviour & Information Technology, 31(8), 753–755.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ973953&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The Internet and its increasing usage has changed informal learning in depth. This change has affected young and older adults in both the workplace and in higher education. But, in spite of this, formal and non-formal course-based approaches have not taken full advantage of these new informal learning scenarios and technologies. The Web 2.0 is a new way for people to communicate across the Internet. Communication is a means of transformation and knowledge exchange. These are the facts that cannot be obviated by the organisations in their training programmes and knowledge management. This special issue is devoted to investigating how informal learning changes or influences online information in Social Web and training strategies in institutions. In order to do so, five papers will present different approaches of informal learning in the workplace regarding Web 2.0 capabilities.

    1. Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies: Benefits, Barriers and Lessons Learned

      In this article, the author defines Web 2.0 technology and use for Web 2.0 in higher education. Through a small study of educators, discovery includes advantages, obstacles, and general guidance for implementation of web 2.0 tools. The author supports use of Web 2.0 to supplement learning, not as a substitute for the educator. Technologies must be implemented strategically and purposefully. 7/10

    1. Using wikis for collaborative learning: Assessing collaboration through contribution

      Through a study of freshman students, the author aimed to determine the success of the Wiki for collaboration. Results revealed variances in learner responses and use of the tool. Lack of use was explained by individual barriers (family, social, work) and system barriers (wiki design). The authors conclude that for the Wiki to be an effective, collaborative tool, additional resources must be provided to the learner, and the Wiki must be meaningful in its design to foster that participation. 7/10

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

    1. Wiki Use that Increases Communication and Collaboration Motivation

      (Click on download full text to read.) Through a cooperative learning assignment, University students responded to a case study that implemented use of a Wiki. Results demonstrate that Wiki is an effective communication and collaboration tool (access, structure, versioning) for all individuals (introvert, extrovert). Recommendations and considerations for use in the learning environment were provided. 6/10

    1. 10 Active Learning Methods for Super Engaged Corporate Learners

      This article reviews the concept of active learning and its need in today's workplace training. Ten strategies to promote active learning via technology are discussed (collaborative virtual classrooms, mind mapping, brainstorming, scavenger hunts, role play/simulation, problem-based learning, discussion boards, teach back, jigsaw technique, flipped classroom, game based learning). This is a good resource for active learning strategies. (5/10)

    1. An onevent event handler property serves as a placeholder of sorts, to which a single event handler can be assigned. In order to allow multiple handlers to be installed for the same event on a given object, you can call its addEventListener() method, which manages a list of handlers for the given event on the object.
    2. The Web platform provides several ways to be notified of DOM events.
    1. Events refers both to a design pattern used for the asynchronous handling of various incidents which occur in the lifetime of a web page and to the naming, characterization, and use of a large number of incidents of different types.
    1. However, a healthy news ecosystem doesn’t just require a thriving free press, it also needs a diversity of curators, newsletters and content discovery options that enable the weird and wonderful to surface. We want to use Nuzzel as a test kitchen to see what models works for curators as well as content creators. The simple goal is a sustainable open web where the goals of creators, curators and consumers are aligned around the best possible experience.

      This sounds exciting to me and could dovetail with efforts of many with respect to IndieWeb for Journalism.

    1. We advocate for a Slow Web Movement. We are what we eat, and we are also what we consume online. Data-driven advertising, BlackBox algorithms, and the competition between Big Tech to keep us “engaged“ has created an addiction to low-value content. It is time to reset our digital consumption and create healthier habits. Since the last decade, with a set of guidelines, the Slow Web Movement is changing Software to make it care about us again. Think of it as the equivalent of "Organic" for Technology.

      As solid a pitch for the slow web movement as I've seen yet from an analogy perspective.

    1. 2011-06-23 at OSBridge2011 having lunch with Ward, Tantek exclaimed: The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb

      This is what I want too!

    1. The path must not twist so much that visitors think they are being led astray, nor be so slow that visitors give up and strike cross-country through search engines. Nevertheless, twists and detours can help designers give their readers more than they expect.

      This makes me wonder if there are interesting major features or patterns we've not created for the web in general. Upsell, crosssell, alternatives, etc... are all corporate features. What about some interesting new artistic features perhaps?

      Almost no websites I run across are designed like this simple garden example. It's as if the website idea has been so rigidly crystalized that there's no room for exploration anymore.

    1. And we see that develop into the web as we know it today. A web of “hey this is cool” one-hop links. A web where where links are used to create a conversational trail (a sort of “read this if you want to understand what I am riffing on” link) instead of associations of ideas. The “conversational web”. A web obsessed with arguing points. A web seen as a tool for self-expression rather than a tool for thought. A web where you weld information and data into your arguments so that it can never be repurposed against you. The web not as a reconfigurable model of understanding but of sealed shut presentations.
    1. The attention of the audience is a writer's most precious possession, and the value of audience attention is seldom more clear than in writing for the Web. The time, care, and expense devoted to creating and promoting a hypertext are lost if readers arrive, glance around, and click elsewhere. How can the craft of hypertext invite readers to stay, to explore, and to reflect?

      A very early statement about what was about to become the "attention economy"

    1. A fun thing to watch for on news sites is when a draft of an article is submitted with an initial slug and title. Later, the title is changed but the slug is left untouched. This can result in some fun situations where the headline of an article has been made more subtle - but the slug retains some fairly blunt language.
    1. But the scariest outcome of the centralization of information in the age of social networks is something else: It is making us all much less powerful in relation to governments and corporations.
    1. I’ve worked on the web professionally for over a decade and I’ve never managed to put together a proper website that I’ve maintained and not just binned every five minutes. Yes, I’ve been making websites for over a decade and never managed to make one for myself.

      It's like they say, "At the plumber's house, the pipes always leak."

    1. I imagine that the first part of this project will focus on how it got to be this way, what got missed or ignored in some of the early warnings about what was happening online and how those warnings were swamped by the hype depicting the Internet as a space of radical democratization.

      I love the brewing idea here. We definitely need this.

      Some broad initial bibliography from the top of my head:

      Larry Sanger (co-founder of Wikipedia)

      Some useful history/timelines: https://indieweb.org/timeline https://indieweb.org/history

    1. Solid is similar to remoteStorage in that it allows apps and services (including unhosted web apps) to store the user's data under the user's control.
    1. You can add an attribute replace to replace the current entry in the history stack instead of adding a new one.
    1. localhost with lvh.me this is a domain that always resolves to localhost and now whenever you write sub1.lvh.me even though a port like sub1.lvh.me:3000 it will still work.
  8. Sep 2020
    1. In '07, safety implied an unacceptable performance hit on slow single-core devices with 128MiB of RAM.

      In 2007, safety implied an unacceptable performance hit for hosting extensions, on devices with one core and 128MiB ram. In 2020, the lack of extensions is the ultimate app-ification of the web, the reduction of the web into a useless, powerless medium where users have no control.

    1. Over the last year, we have gained a better understanding of the performance and correctness characteristics of the various rendering technologies available on the web, and have been experimenting with a second approach that uses CanvasKit. CanvasKit brings Skia to the web using WebAssembly and WebGL, enabling a hardware-accelerated drawing surface that improves our ability to render complex and intensive graphics efficiently.

      you are setting dynamite to hypertext & turning the web into a webassembly powered VNC viewer. this is an awful thing for users, for the web in general. please desist. please i beg you stop.

      the web is not for pushing pixels into people's faces. the web is a system of interlinking hypertext, a place where structured information can be viewed/enhanced by users, navigators, & extensions.

    1. WebAssembly is pretty great, but should web applications just be rendered to a canvas, and every application brings its own graphics toolkit? Do we really want anti-aliasing differences between web applications? Applications-in-containers is a thing - look at Qubes - but it’s not really something that users should want.

      Flutter seems intent on turning applications into mini-VNC sessions into webassembly, with CanvasKit work proceeding full steam ahead. can you please for the love of god NOT, Flutter? abomination.

      the web is more than a means to pump pixels at people's faces; it is a system of structured information, that users, their navigators, & extensions have rights & capabilities to traverse.

    2. The idea of a web browser being something we can comprehend, of a web page being something that more people can make, feels exciting to me.

      my personal hope is that we can build a more sensible coherent web, that exudes the machines inside of it, by better harkening towards custom elements ("webcomponents"). move the page from being a bunch of machines in javascript, to a bunch of machines in hypertext.

      and then build pages that start to expose & let the user play with the dom. start to build experiences that bridge the gap into the machine/page.

      and keep going. keep going. build wilder web experiences. build more machines. and keep building battlesuits for the user, out of more componenets, out of more web, to let them wrestle & tangle with & manipulate & experiment & hack on & see & observe & learn about the truthful, honest, direct hypertext that we all navigate.

    1. I’ll replace Twitter with something else for a little while, and hopefully that’ll seem different.

      on Mastodon these days, it feels very similar. it's a much weaker carrier of memetic payloads, which has ups and downs. it's much more personal. there's an enormous amount of negativity & fear & loathing here, the walkaways it has attracted are often a rather cantankerous sort perhaps. but there are some very good people & very good happenings too. i don't see a whole lot of big picture or cerebral activity, these experiences i see all seem so near at hand, so local to these people, which is interesting but also often fairly boring.

      i look forward to us continuing to chase social. and it reconfirms my interest regularly in doing a better job of curating & surfacing & raising up the bigger bolder & more notable things, versus letting the big & weighty coexist unremarked amid the floofy or trashy whatever.

      oh and content warning are a surprisingly useful way to create & mark off the spaces where you are going to try to semi-safely produce hot takes & land blows. starting with a warning, setting some scope, is quite effective.

    1. Another problem I ran into was knowing when an element is removed. I had to add a MutationObserver on the current tooltip target so if it gets removed by Svelte while the tooltip is visible (e.g. if a click moves to another route) the tooltip isn't left hanging around on the screen. No mouseleave/mouseout events are dispatched on elements that are removed.

      First sighting: MutationObserver

    1. The fully styleable primitives that the web offers (e.g. <div>) are quite powerful, but they lack semantic meaning. This means that accessibility is often missing because assistive technology cannot make sense of the div soup that we use to implement our components.
    1. "das Netz", "die Digitalisierung" oder sogar "das Wissen"

      Ich zweifle daran, dass es das Netz, die Digitalisierung und das Wissen gibt. Ich glaube, dass es sich auch bei ihnen um lokale Phänomene handelt, die auch anders sein könnten, und hinter denen es keine übergreifende Notwendigkeit gibt. Das offene Netz wurde und wird von bestimmten Gruppen und in bestimmten Machtkonstellationen entwickelt, verteidigt und vorangetrieben. Die Digitalisierung hängt eng mit z.B. der kalifornischen counter culture aber auch z.B. der Miniaturisierung und der Firmenpolitik von Chipkonzernen, z.B. Intel zusammen. Sie sähe in einer anderen historischen Konstellation, wenn sie z.B. ihr erstes Zentrum in China oder auch in Europa gewesen wäre, ganz anders aus.

    1. ARCHIVIST (overlapping) Mm, they were… Well, let’s just say it’s not a complete shock there was something unnatural to them. Didn’t know we had copies in the Institute, though, let alone original cuts. [He laughs.] ARCHIVIST (CONT’D) Records indicate they ended up in… (paper flips) Artefact Storage.
    1. The Spider’s always an easy job, no fuss, no complications, everything planned and prepared. It knows too much to truly be a stranger, but hides its knowing well enough to endure. We knew she wouldn’t scream as she was hollowed out and drunk, but still he thought best to cover the sounds with a laugh.
    1. What grabbed his wrist was not a hand. Not exactly, not – anymore. It was coarse and bony and covered in fine, sharp hairs. Greg screamed, falling backwards, pulling the figure under the street lamp where, for a second, I saw it more completely than he did. It was definitely human once. At least, based on how it was screaming. But it was thin, with bits of twisted and discolored, covered in small, scurrying shapes. Its face was the most human part of it remaining. Except for the two black and hollow spaces where its eyes once were. From which now poured an endless stream of scuttling legs and fangs. Its mouth was full of them too, but I could see, as it grasped desperately at Greg; it was trying to say: “I’m sorry. I’m sorry. Tell her I’m sorry,” but words were not what tumbled from those lips.
    2. The Chelicerae popped up on the occasional paranormal site or edgy message board, each time accompanied by a now-defunct link. According to those who followed such things, all you had to do was start a new thread as a Guest, something Greg had been instructed to make sure was possible, and the title of that thread should be the name of someone you want dead. As the stories went, you would receive a reply almost immediately, and it would simply ask you for a story. You would have to write out, and post, in full, a horrible event that had happened to you, or someone that you loved. All the instructions were very clear that the target would only die, if the account satisfied the “Story-spinner.” None of them made any mention of what would happen if it did not.
    3. It started with an email he got from a hotmail address he didn’t recognize. The subject line was simply “Are you the Chelicerae?” At first, Greg thought his client must have passed his details on, but opening the message, there were just four more words: “Please make it stop.”
    4. As he told it, she was young, rail-thin underneath an oversized brown hoodie, which she kept pulled up, trying to cover up a network of pale stitches that stretched over one side of her head.
    1. What I’ve been doing to these people, it – it hasn’t been because I was puppeted, or controlled, or possessed. I wanted to do it. It felt good.
    1. parapsychology

      Also what Martin's "degree" was in

    2. But you think sometimes about what the real world is. Just what your brain mixes together from what your senses tell you. We create the world in a lot of ways. I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that, when we’re not being careful, we can change it.
    1. Dexter clearly wasn’t sleeping. He had insisted on using old equipment, and avoided digital almost entirely, to the point where several of the crew were using pieces of kit they’d never even seen before. This meant that a work print had to be made manually for the dailies, something he refused to let anyone else do.

      Noted by jjhunter on RQO.

    1. I was… not one of those assigned to watch our chosen one, so I can’t say much about exactly what happened within the walls of that house, but it seems the fight scarred the place in a way far deeper than simple fire. A scar in reality, that I believe has since been compounded by the interferences of other powers.
    2. The compromise we came to was Hill Top Road. We knew it was a stronghold of the Web, full of other children Agnes’ age. We would supervise from a distance, but were confident she would be in no danger. The Mother of Puppets has always suffered at our hand; all the manipulation and subtle venom in the world means nothing against a pure and unrestrained force of destruction and ruin.
    3. Regardless, the effect it had on Agnes was unanticipated. As far as we could tell, she had destroyed the place utterly. And yet she remained bound to it, tied to it in some vital way. I knew when Arthur told me she had kept Raymond Fielding’s hand, that he was worried. But none of us could know what you were going to do.
    1. I'm personally surprised about that, given the degree to which web component advocates prioritise encapsulation — it seems like a footgun, honestly
    1. How Much Does It Cost For Web Application Development?

      Discover How Much Does It Cost To Build A Web Application Development. Get The Website Development Cost, Web Developers Rate For Website Development.