1,073 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. why do we have an <img> element? Why not an <icon> element? Or an <include> element? Why not a hyperlink with an include attribute, or some combination of rel values? Why an <img> element? Quite simply, because Marc Andreessen shipped one, and shipping code wins.That’s not to say that all shipping code wins; after all, Andrew and Intermedia and HyTime shipped code too. Code is necessary but not sufficient for success. And I certainly don’t mean to say that shipping code before a standard will produce the best solution.

      Shipping code is necessary, but not sufficient for success.

  2. May 2021
    1. What I am attempting to do is to highlight a div with a certain id, when It has been referred to by an anchor on another page IE: User clicks link href="qw.html#test", when the page is loaded, then the div with the id="test" is highlighted so that the user can see it clearly.
    2. You need to use the :target pseudo-class: :target { background-color: #ffa; }
    1. A common practice in email marketing is to use images for everything in the email: graphics, illustrations, copy, links, and buttons. Although this can be efficient (slice, dice, and send it on its way), it’s another huge problem for subscribers relying on screen readers. The typical image-based email has a lot of information that can’t be parsed by a machine. What’s more is that a lot of email clients disable images by default, too.
    2. However, since we’re using tables purely for structural purposes, we need screen readers to ignore those tables. This is where ARIA roles can help us out. By applying the role="presentation" attribute to a table, we can instruct the screen reader to skip over those elements and move straight into the content.
    1. And what’s more, a growing number of email readers are even voluntarily turning off images in their emails to reduce load time and improve email speed. Google recently revealed that 43% of Gmail users actually don’t read emails with background images on.
    1. Email tools/clients are inconsistent in how they render HTML and CSS. A designed email might look great in Gmail, broken in Outlook, and unreadable in Apple Mail. Half of all emails are opened on mobile devices (according to one study). Email looks good in different clients? Great, now make it work on a 4" screen just as well as on a desktop.
    1. My assertion is based on the observation that a great deal of learning does take place in connective environments on the world wide web, that these have scaled to large numbers, and that often they do not require any institutional or instructional support.
  3. Apr 2021
    1. Over the years, the machinery of targeted advertising has frequently been used for exploitation, discrimination, and harm. The ability to target people based on ethnicity, religion, gender, age, or ability allows discriminatory ads for jobs, housing, and credit. Targeting based on credit history—or characteristics systematically associated with it— enables predatory ads for high-interest loans. Targeting based on demographics, location, and political affiliation helps purveyors of politically motivated disinformation and voter suppression. All kinds of behavioral targeting increase the risk of convincing scams.

      a succinct summary of the harms of tracking and adtech

    2. The power to target is the power to discriminate. By definition, targeted ads allow advertisers to reach some kinds of people while excluding others. A targeting system may be used to decide who gets to see job postings or loan offers just as easily as it is to advertise shoes. 
    3. You should have a right to present different aspects of your identity in different contexts. If you visit a site for medical information, you might trust it with information about your health, but there’s no reason it needs to know what your politics are. Likewise, if you visit a retail website, it shouldn’t need to know whether you’ve recently read up on treatment for depression. FLoC erodes this separation of contexts, and instead presents the same behavioral summary to everyone you interact with.
    1. Documents should offer the same granularity.

      That neither content creators nor browser vendors are particularly concerned with the production and consumption of documents, as such, is precisely the issue. This is evident in the banner that the majority of the work has occurred under over the last 10+ years: they're the Web Hypertext Applications Technology Working Group.

      No one, not even the most well-intentioned (such as the folks at Automattic who are responsible for the blogging software that made Christina's post here possible), see documents when they think of the Web. No, everything is an app—take this page, for example; even the "pages" that WordPress produces are facets of an application. Granted, it's an application meant for reading the written word (and meant for occasionally writing it), but make no mistake, it's an application first, and a "document" only by happenstance (i.e. the absence of any realistic alternative to HTML & co for application delivery).

    1. Instructions for writting a new wildcard adapter for some site.

    1. Entify your Techtale with #1 Website and Mobile App Development Company.

      Apptale is one of the top-notch web design and mobile app development company enriched with efficient and experienced developers who are all sincere and dedicated to work on the projects prior to the deadline. The high-end technologies are integrated to develop and deliver the projects with utmost results and make our clients satisfied.

    1. What Are the Best Languages for Web Application Development in 2021?

      There are thousands of programming languages, and new ones keep being created. This means you have many possible ways to build your website. With so many options, how can you make the right choice? Our market researchers and web app developers have collaborated to create a list of the top seven languages for web application development in 2021

    1. The best tool is no tool, the best build step is no build step, the best update is no update. HTML gives us all that, and more.

      Truth!

    1. .mainContent {  -webkit-user-select: none; -moz-user-select: none; -ms-user-select: none;  user-select: none; }

    1. I LOVE the hover effects for the book covers on this site which is also a great example of someone collecting highlights/annotations of the books they read and hosting them in public on their personal website.

      Melanie has written about the CSS part of the hover effect here: https://melanie-richards.com/blog/highlights-minisite/ and like all awesome things, she's got the site open at https://github.com/melanierichards/highlights. I may have to do some serious digging for figuring out how she's creating the .svg images for the covers though.

    1. CSS-generated content is not included in the DOM. Because of this, it will not be represented in the accessibility tree and certain assistive technology/browser combinations will not announce it. If the content conveys information that is critical to understanding the page's purpose, it is better to include it in the main document.
    1. This year’s Slow Art Day — April 10 — comes at a time when museums find themselves in vastly different circumstances.

      Idea: Implement a slow web week for the IndieWeb, perhaps to coincide with the summit at the end of the week.

      People eschew reading material from social media and only consume from websites and personal blogs for a week. The tough part is how to implement actually doing this. Many people would have a tough time finding interesting reading material in a short time. What are good discovery endpoints for that? WordPress.com's reader? Perhaps support from feed reader community?

    1. Hérigone's only important work is the six volume Cursus mathematicus, nova, brevi, et clara methodo demonstratus Ⓣ<span class="non-italic">(</span>Course on mathematics : new, short, and with clear methods shown<span class="non-italic">)</span> or, to give it its French title, Cours mathematique, demonstre d'une nouvelle, briefve, et claire methode which appeared between 1634 and 1642.

      There is a clever little bit of UI on this page in which there appears a red letter T in a circle after the Latin title. If one clicks it ,there's a pop up of the translation of the title into English.

    1. My favorite part of this entire plan has to be the part where I use Github Issues as a blog. Kind of. For every new feature (or set of features) I want to add to the site—no matter how small, like adding a Favicon, for example—I will open a new issue and create a corresponding branch where the work on that feature will happen. I will basically produce a(n) infrequent stream of short “blog posts” in the form of Github issues. The live code for each issue/feature will live in the issue’s corresponding branch. As someone who tends to do multiple things at once, this will take a lot of organization and discipline, and that’s the challenging part for me.

      This is a fascinating and very illustrative use of GitHub for web development. I mostly like that she's pointing out her use case.

    2. I am going to rebuild this Web site in public.
  4. Mar 2021
    1. @ajlkn has several related projects including this one:

      Might be an interesting experiment to make one or more of them IndieWeb friendly and create a set up to dovetail one or more of them in with the GitHub pages set up.

    1. User stories are a great way of designing features, but when you are designing community features on the web it is also useful to have user stories that start “I am an absolute arsehole and I want to…”

      Solid advice.

    1. Silence Here’s another, more subtle, point about the grace of email and newsletters: Creation and consumption don’t happen in the same space. When I go to send a missive in Campaign Monitor the world of my laptop screen is as silent as a midnight Tokyo suburb.9 I think we’ve inured ourselves to the (false) truth that in order to post something, in order to contribute something to the stream, we must look at the stream itself, “Bird Box”-esque, and woe be the person in a productive creative jag, wanting to publish, who can resist those hot political tweets.

      This rings very true to me and is a definite benefit of composing things within my own domain rather than too quickly within a social silo's interface.

    1. Who owns and controls it?

      This is worth discussion. Specifically the ownership part and it may be surprising to uncover how little control there has been and how that is changing in 2021 as ISPs and hosting companies refuse or welcome radical platforms and groups, https://www.npr.org/2021/02/15/968116346/after-weeks-of-being-off-line-parler-finds-a-new-web-host

    1. And it’s tempting for engineers to think decentralising the Web can be achieved with technology. But really, it’s people who will make it happen. Rather than staying put in our little filter bubbles, we can burst out of them — and be radically sociable, delinquent, and make a scene.

      off label uses of technology are important

      I'm reminded of how Kicks Condor has appreciated my "people work" in the past.

    1. I really like this and want to figure out way to do it on my own website. It could be fun to tuck it in with the weather and location data I'm already collecting.

    1. I was pretty annoyed with myself for having fallen for the trap of not documenting my own systems, but not sure how I could have remembered all of the Hugo-isms

      I've explained such a system, and promised Andy Chu an example that I've yet to be able to complete, but it comes down to this:

      A website is fundamentally a document repository. One of the first documents that you should store in that repository is one which explains, in detail, the procedures for provisioning the host powering the site and how content gets published. (Even better if it's so detailed that the procedures exhibit a degree of rigor such that a machine can carry them out, rather than requiring manual labor by a human.)

    1. In terms of defining the “open” in open web annotation, I tend to take a standards approach: the Hypothes.is tool is built upon, and our organization advocates for, open standards in web annotation.

      This explanation also highlights an additional idea of open itself. I have heard many in the W3C space criticize the open standard of web annotation arrived at because of the ultimate monoculture of the space. Most of the participants of the process were all related to Hypothes.is in some way and the result was a single product that implemented the standard. To my knowledge no other companies, groups, or individual programmers have separately implemented the standard.

      In this sense, while the "standard" is openly defined, it isn't as open as other standards which were mote slowly evolved and implemented gradually and more broadly by various programming languages and disparate groups.

    1. The valueAsNumber IDL attribute represents the value of the element, interpreted as a number. On getting, if the valueAsNumber attribute does not apply, as defined for the input element's type attribute's current state, then return a Not-a-Number (NaN) value.
    1. Screen readers for the blind can help them fill out a form more easily if the logical sections are broken into fieldsets with one legend for each one. A blind user can hear the legend text and decide, "oh, I can skip this section," just as a sighted user might do by reading it.
    2. Fits the ideal behind HTML HTML stands for "HyperText Markup Language"; its purpose is to mark up, or label, your content. The more accurately you mark it up, the better. New elements are being introduced in HTML5 to more accurately label common web page parts, such as headers and footers.
    1. Open source code library for building innovative e-learning that is accessible, usable, interoperable, mobile-friendly and multilingual. Based on the Web Experience Toolkit (WET) and bootstrap. This collaborative open source project is led by the Canada School of Public Service, Government of Canada.
    1. Accepting PaymentsTracking RevenueCustomer SupportCollaboration and Internal CommunicationMarketing and SalesSEO and Content MarketingAnalyzing Web TrafficServer and HostingBilling and AccountingDesignData VisualizationPassword ManagementDigital Signatures

      Nice collection of programs or SaaS for:

      • Accepting Payments
      • Tracking Revenue
      • Customer Support
      • Collaboration and Internal Communication
      • Marketing and Sales
      • SEO and Content Marketing
      • Analyzing Web Traffic
      • Server and Hosting
      • Billing and Accounting
      • Design
      • Data Visualization
      • Password Management
      • Digital Signatures
    2. Nice collection of communication & producivity programs or SaaS.

    1. Service workers are limited though. A site can opt to perform whatever substitutions it likes, but it can only do that for its own requests.

      for requests both to it's origin, and also coming from it's origin. this latter restriction seems unnecessary, but alas, there has been little traction trying to get Foreign Fetch - enabling service workers to be accessible across origins - back into the spec. Foreign Fetch would greatly help the offline web. https://github.com/w3c/ServiceWorker/issues/1188

    1. Eventually, you’ve got a realization of the way web development organizational structure works. Led by a project manager and supported by a project architect, it can not exist without frontend, backend, and full-stack programmers, DevOps, and Q/A engineers. Optionally, you may need UI/UX designer, business analyst, and SEO expert. Every team player separately and altogether, they make your wishes real. Now, when you know all members’ duties, it should be easier to address your questions and concerns to the right person.  
  5. Feb 2021
    1. try { const value = await localforage.getItem('somekey'); // This code runs once the value has been loaded // from the offline store. console.log(value); } catch (err) { // This code runs if there were any errors. console.log(err); }

      This looks like the best approach for me. async/await

    1. The alternative was to have multiple scripts or stylesheet links on one page, which would trigger multiple HTTP requests. Multiple requests mean multiple connection handshakes for each link “hey, I want some data”, “okay, I have the data”, “alright I heard that you have the data, give it to me” (SYN, ACK, SYNACK). Even once the connection is created there is a feature of TCP called TCP slow start that will throttle the speed of the data being sent at the beginning of a request to a slower speed than the end of the request. All of this means transferring one large request is faster than transferring the same data split up into several smaller requests.
    1. Nicely explains how to make asynchronous calls to API/services. Async/Await

    2. try/catch block to be able to catch the error

      Nice!

      The final result of they try catch block it that the code that follows below is almost exactly like how I usually code synchronously. It's so much easier to read.

    3. Callback Hell

      This is so easy to fall into. I've done it a few times. Always try to avoid this.

    4. Promises

      Never forget this. It's very important.

  6. getdweb.net getdweb.net
    1. Seems like a lot of talk.

      Nice that they've got a website, but their primary social networks are all centralized corporate silos and they don't even haven RS /ATOM feed.

    1. n the article, we consider the following questions: the types of marketplaces; how to build a marketplace website; main steps in developing an online marketplace; the price of marketplace website creating; functions of a marketplace. https://code-care.com/blog/build-a-marketplace-website/

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jack Jamieson</span> in I really appreciate @emmibevensee’s r… (<time class='dt-published'>02/13/2021 12:36:00</time>)</cite></small>

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    1. Universal Links allow you to register a series of domains that are allowed to interact with an installed application. If the application is not installed, the universal link is opened with Safari, allowing you to inform the user of the existence of an application or whatever is necessary.
    1. Implicit intents do not name a specific component, but instead declare a general action to perform, which allows a component from another app to handle it. For example, if you want to show the user a location on a map, you can use an implicit intent to request that another capable app show a specified location on a map.
    1. <pre>  My Bonnie lies over the ocean.   My Bonnie lies over the sea.  My Bonnie lies over the ocean.  Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me.</pre>

      This looks really useful.

    1. Sass

      Define variables, such as colors (e.g. $primary: #337ab7) in Sass (styles.scss) then compile to css for web.

      R library "bootstraplib" built on foundation of "sass".

      Use "run_with_themer()" to get a live preview GUI for customizing bootstrap theme.

      Also, use "shinyOptions(plot.autocolors=TRUE)" at top of app to get plot outputs that respect Dark Mode.

    1. Although one thing you want to avoid is using frames in such a manner that the content of the site is in the frame and a menu is outside of the frame. Although this may seem convienient, all of your pages become unbookmarkable.
    1. There is one situation where iframes are (almost) required: when the contents of the iframe is in a different domain, and you have to perform authentication or check cookies that are bound to that domain. It actually prevents security problems instead of creating them. For example, if you're writing a kind of plugin that can be used on any website, but the plugin has to authenticate on another domain, you could create a seamless iframe that runs and authenticates on the external domain.
    2. Iframes can have similar issues as frames and inconsiderate use of XMLHttpRequest: They break the one-document-per-URL paradigm, which is essential for the proper functioning of the web (think bookmarks, deep-links, search engines, ...).
    3. The most striking such issue is probably that of deep linking: It's true that iframes suffer from this to a lesser extent than frames, but if you allow your users to navigate between different pages in the iframe, it will be a problem.
    4. never care and try to understand design standards
    5. If you're creating an actual, informational web page, stick to frameless HTML, CSS and unobstrusive JavaScripts and keep in mind that the page should still be usable with scripting disabled.
    1. I normally try to figure out if that's a good solution for the problem before resorting to iframes. Sometimes, however, an iframe just does the job better. It maintains its own browser history, helps you segregate CSS styles if that's an issue with the content you're loading in.
    1. that's a point, but I would say the opposite, when entering credit card data I would rathre prefer to be entirely in the Verified By Visa (Paypal) webpage (with the url easily visible in the address bar) rather that entring my credit card data in an iframe of someone's website.
    2. Then recently I was shopping at the John Lewis website, and they brought up the Verified By Visa page in an iframe - wonderful! I'm still looking at the John Lewis site, and all that's happening is I'm being asked for my Verified By Visa password - no problem. Although as a web developer I know that there's no technical difference between that and a plain old redirect-there-redirect-back, the user experience is so much better!
    1. It’s kind of like putting a SIM card in a cell phone – the SIM card tells that phone, “Hey, you work with this particular phone number now.” Just like you can switch out a phone’s SIM card and make the phone work with a different phone number, your domain can be set to work with a different web hosting service.
    1. many a tech manager has siezed on them as a solution to many problems. In fact, they create more.
    2. if used for parameterized content, they've created an interface. And in a professional site, that interface requires an SLA and version management - which are almost always ignored in rush to get online.
    3. And if your framed content has a need to be interactive, it will struggle to do so beyond the frame.
    4. Usually, if you can do it without an iframe, that is a better option. I'm sure others here may have more information or more specific examples, it all comes down to the problem you are trying to solve.
    5. think about them as a text/markup equivalent to the way a video or another media file would be embedded
    6. The downside is that if you introduce multiple layers of scrolling (one for the browser, one for the iframe) your users will get frustrated. Like adzm said, you don't want to use an iframe for primary navigation
    7. on the other hand, documents from different origins can still communicate using window.postMessage(), for example to implement collaborative iframe auto-resizing.
    8. but I wouldn't use a frameset for anything but a manual since it no longer exists in html5. Example: Game maker manual
    9. However I've seen iframes abused as well. It should never be used as an integral part of your site, but as a piece of content within a site.
    1. Designers hated them. Yes, that was the deadliest punch. Everything looked square and straight. They hated it. They wanted arcs and image backgrounds and rounded borders. Now they have it in CSS3 - guess what, they're drawing squares. #whatever Programmers had trouble with them. It was inconvenient to follow the logic of frames, and you had to do some extra work. I mean, some. Today it's a lot harder to create AJAX solutions for the same problem, but no one complains. #whatever Websites could include one another. This was painful for some site owners because they worked hard on something and another fella used it as own content. Later, they invented same origin policy, but it was way after starting to hate frames. Content stealing is still an issue today, absolutely unrelated to whether we have frames or not. #whatever Back button worked differently. Yes, it was a bit annoying. But it was not the frame concept's fault, again: it was browsers who did this to us. Could have been solved easily, but nah, browsers kept going back one by one, not providing the site a way to implement its own "step back" method, and alas, this is still happening today. #whatever