59 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. Training and Development Policy Wiki

      This webpage, under the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) .gov site, provides an extensive list of technology resources that can be and have been implemented into a variety of employee deveolpment programs. These tools allow for more personalized learning, active participation, collaboration, and communication.In the first section of the site, examples of Web 2.0 tools are listed that can promote collaboration and constructive learning. You can also find technologies that are used in specific sectors, such as the Federal Government and the Private Sector. Clicking on the links redirects you to additional resources on the tech tools, including how to use them effectively and professionally for employee training. Rating 10/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough

      Instruction Librarians from the Twin Cities Campus Library created this instructional gudie as a workshop for implementing technology for adult learning. First, the authors describe key characteristics of adult learners as identified in the theory of andragogy. Examples of these characteristics include the need to know, learner responsibility, past experiences, and motivation to learn. The authors then suggest instructional practices and activities to meet the needs of adult learners, Finally, they provide examples of technology tools for effectively engaging adult learners. Rating 10/10

  2. www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. Technology

      This website explores technology news within the field of higher education. The site contains a wide variety of news articles on current issues, trends, and research surrounding the integration of technology in universities and colleges. This includes technology's prevalence in teaching and learning, institutional decisions, and societal trends of higher education. The articles are published by authors for "The Chronicle of Higher Education," a leading newspaper and website for higher education journalism. Rating: 7/10

  3. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. This study researches the development of clinical trainers and their learners. Also, the article discussed how to create effective training. Key Words knowledge translation, training transfer, continuing professional education, instructional design

    1. Problem-based learning (PBL) in a growing trend in approaching adult learning, particularly in ESL/ELL classrooms. In this text, the basic principles and methods of PBL for ELL/ESL classes are covered for instructors to implement. Key aspects of PBL include relevance to student lives and the opportunity to practice English in a heterogenous group with the end goal being application to another area of life. Multiple resources are helpful for implementation of PBL including technology. A review of the benefits of PBL is summarized as well as drawbacks with embedded suggestions to resolve possible difficulties. Rating: 8/10

    1. In this text, authors Kit Kacirek and Michael Miller explore adult learning for mature adults, or those identified as senior citizens. Research into mature adult learning programs centered around leisure activities, reveals situational pedagogy in which some traditional adult learning theory may need to be adapted to suit the cognitive changes in adults with advanced age. A brief description of the research methods reveals that adults in advanced age prefer lecture, use of media, and field trips. The implications for such a study are useful as the population of mature adults grows due to advancements in medicine and thus the demand for learning opportunities increases as well.

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. Author Douglas Lieberman provides insights into how to use text to improve learning. Suggestions for type of text, volume of text, animations, and graphics are discussed to maximize their usefulness and convey information to learners and/or facilitate discussion among learners. Rating: 6/10

    1. The Northwest Center of Public Health Practice's toolkit title "Effective Adult Learning: A toolkit for teaching adults," is . a highly comprehensive resource for instructional design for adult learning instructors. Sections include course or training design, objectives of adult learning, various tools to help in the process of course design, and brief overviews of adult learning methods and theory. The embedded section review charts make it easier for quick references. Rating: 10/10

    1. Author Mary Burns discusses the key elements of computer adaptive testing (CAT). CAT is defined as assessments that use algorithms to progressively adjust test difficulty based upon learner's correct or incorrect responses. The benefits of CAT include more immediate data and are often more reliable. Types of test items are also covered to illustrate how the test can meet various levels of cognition and measure expertise. An issue related to CAT is the intensive time needed to develop multiple test items at multiple levels of cognition. Rating: 8/10

    1. conventional learning objectives can work against us.

      Cathy Moore discusses the love-hate relationship with learning objectives. Objectives can be a critical tool to guide instruction however, we can miss the boat when it comes to meaningful, applicable, and relevant learning. In the text, Moore is critical of objectives that merely are used to ensure a learner knows content. It is preferential, and superior instruction, to ensure a learner can exercise the knowledge with observable actions in context. Rating: 9/10

    1. The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) provides opportunities for professional development for adult learning instructors and organizations that serve adult learners. CAEL has launched its first live stream of the conference to allow people to attend remotely. While the conference has since passed, this resource could be useful to calendar for the coming year. Included on the is a blog, newsletter sign up, and resources for higher education, employers and workforce development. Rating 8/10

    1. To understand adult learning, you shouldunderstand learning domains, learning styles, and how and why adults learn.

      This articles explains adult learning (styles) and what is instructional design, ISD model (analysis, design, development, Implementation, and Evaluation). Then followed by the learning outcome, the best way to organize, and create useful instruction. Rating: 3/5

    1. Educators are feeling more and more pressure to provide educational content and teaching methods that keep pace with ongoing scientific and technical progress.

      The topics of this article is technology and adult students. The author writes about the challenges the adult learner faces with technology, what adult learners have in common, Andragogy information/challenges, Technology in the classroom and how it challenging integration issues, and how technology and andragogy is used. The article is great way to view how adult students utilize technology whether it be positive or negative. Rating: 4/5

    1. In this text, instructional designers are given brief synopses of three adult learning theories including andragogy, transformational learning, and experiential learning in order to understand how adults best learn and apply learning. The structure of the text is brief paragraphs with numerated descriptors and/or bullet points for reader convenience. Suggestions for learning activities are also provided for the instructional designer to consider in their course design. In the segment for transformative learning, a link is provided to provide the instructional designer more specific methods to incorporate. At the end of the text, diagrams are provided to visual core aspects and flow of each learning theories process. Rating: 7/10

  4. Sep 2019
    1. We need to position instructional designers so they are receiving equitable pay for the expertise and efforts that they bring to the table. Finally, we need more transparent job descriptions so that potential employers and employees can assess whether it will be a good fit before the instructional designer is hired. Right now, I'm seeing a lot of people falling out of positions quickly just because the skill sets, job responsibilities, and expectations just didn't line up."7

      Interesting to think that the job descriptions are not transparent. What do others post then? Looking at Higher Ed Jobs site below is a job posting. Notice the word "Evaluation" arugh!

      JOB DESCRIPTION

      UD is currently seeking an Instructional Designer. The Instructional Designer is responsible for assisting in development and evaluation of online, hybrid, and on-campus education courses and resources. The Instructional Designer works closely with faculty and staff to design online courses and/or course material. Additional responsibilities include departmental instructional development projects, web-based and multimedia modules, and performing operational tasks.

      PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Collaborate with subject matter experts in designing new courses, revising existing courses, developing learning objectives, activities, assessments, rubrics, and provide guidance in instructional design and technology. Apply the principles of Adult Learning Theory, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Learning Styles to the design of all course and training materials. Conduct quality assurance and assessment for existing and newly developed courses providing feedback for improvements. Develop, maintain, and provide professional development opportunities in the areas of instructional design, teaching, and resources to faculty, students, and administrators. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS Bachelor’s degree in Instructional Design, Instructional Technology, Adult Learning or a related field. Master’s degree in Instructional Design preferred. Prior experience in an online design at a higher education institution preferred.

    2. many instructional designers and others adjacent to the field have responded swiftly with critiques that range from outright rejection of the term, to general skepticism about the concept, to distrust for its advocates and their support of learning analytics and outcomes-based learning.

      Why the rejection of the term? Is it too mechanical?

    3. "World-class instructional designers can help one institution differentiate itself from others in the online learning market.

      I wish that instructional design wasn't always thought of as only for online learning, but that did a lot to propel the field forward.

  5. Mar 2019
    1. The Accessibility Guide

      Arizona State University has a public webpage i nregards to accessibility and instructional design. The web page links to multiple online resources that outline accessibility standards across the United States. Additionally, this webpage provides an accessibility guide for anyone to download for instructional design related projects. Rating 9/10 for being a helpful resource that is easily accessible.

    1. This article reviews three learning styles and gives examples of how they fit into the three learning domains. Additionally this article reviews assumptions about adult learning and what it might actually mean. Lastly, this article reviews the instructional system design model and breaks down it's components. Rating 7/10 for lack of discussion but helpful tables

    1. The purpose of this paper is to propose an in-structional-design theory that supports a sense of community.

      This article addresses the fact that new instructional design theories and methods are needed to keep up with new technologies and ways of learning. This article reviews instructional design tools for creating a sense of community online for learners. Additionally, this article discusses the differences between design theory and descriptive theory as it pertains to instructional design. 6/10 This article is very specific and might only be relevant for a specific study or topic

    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      This article takes on Adult Learning from an Instructional Design perspective. This article reviews 3 adult learning theories and why it's important for Instructional Designers to keep these theories in mind the facilitate the learning process. Rating: 9/10 for easy reading, overview of learning theories and emphasis on instructional design

    1. This webpage discusses different learning styles for adults, the principles of adult learning theory and different instructional design models for the the present and future. This webpage reviews andragogy and adult learning theory from the works of Malcolm Knowles. This article comes from Rutgers University and provides additional resources for adult learners. Ratings: 7/10 for helpful, short overview

    1. This site explains the features that instructional designers or others would integrate with personalized design. Based on a graphic, it may have been meant for K-12 students, but appears applicable to other forms of learning as well. This appears to be more credible and more informative than other pages I have found so far. rating 4/5

    1. Gagne's nine events of instruction I am including this page for myself because it is a nice reference back to Gagne's nine events and it gives both an example of each of the events as well as a list of four essential principles. It also includes some of his book titles. rating 4/5

    1. This link is to a three-page PDF that describes Gagne's nine events of instruction, largely in in the form of a graphic. Text is minimized and descriptive text is color coded so it is easy to find underneath the graphic at the top. The layout is simple and easy to follow. A general description of Gagne's work is not part of this page. While this particular presentation does not have personal appeal to me, it is included here due to the quality of the page and because the presentation is more user friendly than most. Rating 4/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. This page describes a method of teaching designed specifically for adults. The instructional design theory is Keller's "ARCS," which stands for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction--all features that adult learning experiences should be characterized by. The text on this page is readable but the popups and graphics are a bit annoying. rating 3/5

    1. Teaching problem solving This page is included because some of our theories indicate that problem solving should be taught specifically. This page is a bit unusual; I did not find many others like it. It is rather easy to read and also addresses the differences between novice and expert learners. rating 3/5

    1. This is a description of the form of backward design referred to as Understanding by Design. In its simplest form, this is a three step process in which instructional designers first specify desired outcomes and acceptable evidence before specifying learning activities. This presentation may be a little boring to read as it is text-heavy and black and white, but those same attributes make it printer friendly. rating 3/5

    1. Mager's tips on instructional objectives This is a very simple page that consists of black and white text without any graphics. As is, the text on the page is rather small and difficult (for me, anyway) to read, so one may wish to enlarge it. The process of creating instructional objectives in this format is explained in a clear and straightforward way. Rating 5/5

  6. Jan 2019
    1. For example, an individual who believes that knowledge in a certain domain consists of a set of discrete, relatively static facts will likely achieve a sense of certainty on a research question much more quickly than someone who views knowledge as provisional, relative, and evolving.

      But when curricula reinforce the confusion of speed and intelligence, that time may be precious.

    2. additional motivation for test subjects to process information accurately made the impact of early preferences less prominent, though the influence did not disappear entirely

      Interesting implications for assignment design.

  7. Nov 2018
    1. Learning needs analysis of collaborative e-classes in semi-formal settings: The REVIT exampl

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. In addition to discussing Knowles Andragogy learning theory this article also looks into two other adult learning theories: experiential and transformational. For learning to be successful in adults instructional designers need to "tap into prior experiences," "create a-ha moments," and "create meaning" by connecting to reality. Rating: 5/5

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. “The ADDIE model consists of five steps: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. It is a strategic plan for course design and may serve as a blueprint to design IL assignments and various other instructional activities.”

      This article provides a well diagrammed and full explanation of the addie model and its' application to technology.

      Also included on the site is a link to an online course delivered via diversityedu.com

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  8. Oct 2018
    1. Critical Instructional Design is new, and as such is grounded in the work of a very few people.

      I'm interested if the conception 'Critical Instructional Design' is truly new or mere interpolation of a native concept. As far as my understanding of critical theory, from lit crit readings and study, a theory can be molded to fit any necessary unnamed reality-from the nature of the TV War... Baudrillard's 'The Gulf War Did Not Take Place' to Freudian psychoanalysis "Neuroticisms of Computer A.I." This is an excellent article to discuss critical theory in the light of a new, online iteration of the learning space meriting further research.

  9. May 2018
    1. rather than to comprehend them

      Thinking about instructional design here - how verbs like understand and appreciate are to be avoided in learning outcomes because they are difficult to measure - and wondering if this isn't an outcome.

  10. Nov 2017
  11. Oct 2017
    1. definition of field: The field of instructional design and technology encompasses the analysis of learning and performance problems, and the design, development, implementa- tion, evaluation and management of instructional and non-instructional processes and resources intended to improve learning and performance in a variety of set- tings, particularly educational institutions and the workplace. Professionals in the field of instructional design and technology often use systematic instruc- tional design procedures and employ a variety of instructional media to accomplish their goals. More- over, in recent years, they have paid increasing atten- tion to non-instructional solutions to some performance problems. Research and theory related to each of the aforementioned areas is also an important part of the field. (Reiser, in p

      Definition of instructional design by Reiser

  12. Sep 2017
  13. Jun 2017
  14. Mar 2017
    1. Star Legacy by the Vanderbilt LearningTechnology Center, 4-Mat by McCarthy,instructional episodes by Andre, multipleapproaches to understanding by Gardner,collaborative problem solving by Nelson,constructivist learning environments byJonassen, and learning by doing by Schank.

      Something to investigate...

      especially "multiple approaches to understanding by Gardner"

  15. Feb 2017
  16. Jan 2017
  17. May 2016
    1. Wiggins and McTighe’s solutions—backward design, sharing detailed rubrics with students, etc.—are certainly the right way to do teacher-centered, standards-driven education based on measurable outcomes.

      I've been wondering for a long time about ID, UbD and the like as they fit in with open educational practices and open pedagogy. It seems like they're closed in a way, in that the the goals, the way they're defined and the means to getting there are all defined for the learner. But if we really want to help people grow and be all they can be, we have to cede control to the learners, so they can start to define their own goals, and find out how to set their own paths.

  18. Dec 2015
    1. course design is more important than the LMS

      In all the platform news, we can talk about “learning management” in view of instructional and course design. But maybe it even goes further than design into a variety of practices which aren´t through-designed.

  19. Jan 2015
    1. We strongly prefer our own term, knowledge-building community. It suggests continuity with the other knowledge-building communities that exist beyond the schools, and the term building implies that the classroom community works to produce knowledge - a collective product and not merely a summary report of what is in individual minds or a collection of outputs from group work.

      This fits with the open/closed scale for judging learning environments.