42 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. We need to position instructional designers so they are receiving equitable pay for the expertise and efforts that they bring to the table. Finally, we need more transparent job descriptions so that potential employers and employees can assess whether it will be a good fit before the instructional designer is hired. Right now, I'm seeing a lot of people falling out of positions quickly just because the skill sets, job responsibilities, and expectations just didn't line up."7

      Interesting to think that the job descriptions are not transparent. What do others post then? Looking at Higher Ed Jobs site below is a job posting. Notice the word "Evaluation" arugh!

      JOB DESCRIPTION

      UD is currently seeking an Instructional Designer. The Instructional Designer is responsible for assisting in development and evaluation of online, hybrid, and on-campus education courses and resources. The Instructional Designer works closely with faculty and staff to design online courses and/or course material. Additional responsibilities include departmental instructional development projects, web-based and multimedia modules, and performing operational tasks.

      PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES Collaborate with subject matter experts in designing new courses, revising existing courses, developing learning objectives, activities, assessments, rubrics, and provide guidance in instructional design and technology. Apply the principles of Adult Learning Theory, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Learning Styles to the design of all course and training materials. Conduct quality assurance and assessment for existing and newly developed courses providing feedback for improvements. Develop, maintain, and provide professional development opportunities in the areas of instructional design, teaching, and resources to faculty, students, and administrators. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS Bachelor’s degree in Instructional Design, Instructional Technology, Adult Learning or a related field. Master’s degree in Instructional Design preferred. Prior experience in an online design at a higher education institution preferred.

    2. many instructional designers and others adjacent to the field have responded swiftly with critiques that range from outright rejection of the term, to general skepticism about the concept, to distrust for its advocates and their support of learning analytics and outcomes-based learning.

      Why the rejection of the term? Is it too mechanical?

    3. "World-class instructional designers can help one institution differentiate itself from others in the online learning market.

      I wish that instructional design wasn't always thought of as only for online learning, but that did a lot to propel the field forward.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. The Accessibility Guide

      Arizona State University has a public webpage i nregards to accessibility and instructional design. The web page links to multiple online resources that outline accessibility standards across the United States. Additionally, this webpage provides an accessibility guide for anyone to download for instructional design related projects. Rating 9/10 for being a helpful resource that is easily accessible.

    1. This article reviews three learning styles and gives examples of how they fit into the three learning domains. Additionally this article reviews assumptions about adult learning and what it might actually mean. Lastly, this article reviews the instructional system design model and breaks down it's components. Rating 7/10 for lack of discussion but helpful tables

    1. The purpose of this paper is to propose an in-structional-design theory that supports a sense of community.

      This article addresses the fact that new instructional design theories and methods are needed to keep up with new technologies and ways of learning. This article reviews instructional design tools for creating a sense of community online for learners. Additionally, this article discusses the differences between design theory and descriptive theory as it pertains to instructional design. 6/10 This article is very specific and might only be relevant for a specific study or topic

    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      This article takes on Adult Learning from an Instructional Design perspective. This article reviews 3 adult learning theories and why it's important for Instructional Designers to keep these theories in mind the facilitate the learning process. Rating: 9/10 for easy reading, overview of learning theories and emphasis on instructional design

    1. This webpage discusses different learning styles for adults, the principles of adult learning theory and different instructional design models for the the present and future. This webpage reviews andragogy and adult learning theory from the works of Malcolm Knowles. This article comes from Rutgers University and provides additional resources for adult learners. Ratings: 7/10 for helpful, short overview

    1. This site explains the features that instructional designers or others would integrate with personalized design. Based on a graphic, it may have been meant for K-12 students, but appears applicable to other forms of learning as well. This appears to be more credible and more informative than other pages I have found so far. rating 4/5

    1. Gagne's nine events of instruction I am including this page for myself because it is a nice reference back to Gagne's nine events and it gives both an example of each of the events as well as a list of four essential principles. It also includes some of his book titles. rating 4/5

    1. This link is to a three-page PDF that describes Gagne's nine events of instruction, largely in in the form of a graphic. Text is minimized and descriptive text is color coded so it is easy to find underneath the graphic at the top. The layout is simple and easy to follow. A general description of Gagne's work is not part of this page. While this particular presentation does not have personal appeal to me, it is included here due to the quality of the page and because the presentation is more user friendly than most. Rating 4/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. This page describes a method of teaching designed specifically for adults. The instructional design theory is Keller's "ARCS," which stands for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction--all features that adult learning experiences should be characterized by. The text on this page is readable but the popups and graphics are a bit annoying. rating 3/5

    1. Teaching problem solving This page is included because some of our theories indicate that problem solving should be taught specifically. This page is a bit unusual; I did not find many others like it. It is rather easy to read and also addresses the differences between novice and expert learners. rating 3/5

    1. This is a description of the form of backward design referred to as Understanding by Design. In its simplest form, this is a three step process in which instructional designers first specify desired outcomes and acceptable evidence before specifying learning activities. This presentation may be a little boring to read as it is text-heavy and black and white, but those same attributes make it printer friendly. rating 3/5

    1. Mager's tips on instructional objectives This is a very simple page that consists of black and white text without any graphics. As is, the text on the page is rather small and difficult (for me, anyway) to read, so one may wish to enlarge it. The process of creating instructional objectives in this format is explained in a clear and straightforward way. Rating 5/5

  3. Jan 2019
    1. For example, an individual who believes that knowledge in a certain domain consists of a set of discrete, relatively static facts will likely achieve a sense of certainty on a research question much more quickly than someone who views knowledge as provisional, relative, and evolving.

      But when curricula reinforce the confusion of speed and intelligence, that time may be precious.

    2. additional motivation for test subjects to process information accurately made the impact of early preferences less prominent, though the influence did not disappear entirely

      Interesting implications for assignment design.

  4. Nov 2018
    1. Learning needs analysis of collaborative e-classes in semi-formal settings: The REVIT exampl

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. In addition to discussing Knowles Andragogy learning theory this article also looks into two other adult learning theories: experiential and transformational. For learning to be successful in adults instructional designers need to "tap into prior experiences," "create a-ha moments," and "create meaning" by connecting to reality. Rating: 5/5

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. “The ADDIE model consists of five steps: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. It is a strategic plan for course design and may serve as a blueprint to design IL assignments and various other instructional activities.”

      This article provides a well diagrammed and full explanation of the addie model and its' application to technology.

      Also included on the site is a link to an online course delivered via diversityedu.com

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  5. Oct 2018
    1. Critical Instructional Design is new, and as such is grounded in the work of a very few people.

      I'm interested if the conception 'Critical Instructional Design' is truly new or mere interpolation of a native concept. As far as my understanding of critical theory, from lit crit readings and study, a theory can be molded to fit any necessary unnamed reality-from the nature of the TV War... Baudrillard's 'The Gulf War Did Not Take Place' to Freudian psychoanalysis "Neuroticisms of Computer A.I." This is an excellent article to discuss critical theory in the light of a new, online iteration of the learning space meriting further research.

  6. May 2018
    1. rather than to comprehend them

      Thinking about instructional design here - how verbs like understand and appreciate are to be avoided in learning outcomes because they are difficult to measure - and wondering if this isn't an outcome.

  7. Nov 2017
  8. Oct 2017
    1. definition of field: The field of instructional design and technology encompasses the analysis of learning and performance problems, and the design, development, implementa- tion, evaluation and management of instructional and non-instructional processes and resources intended to improve learning and performance in a variety of set- tings, particularly educational institutions and the workplace. Professionals in the field of instructional design and technology often use systematic instruc- tional design procedures and employ a variety of instructional media to accomplish their goals. More- over, in recent years, they have paid increasing atten- tion to non-instructional solutions to some performance problems. Research and theory related to each of the aforementioned areas is also an important part of the field. (Reiser, in p

      Definition of instructional design by Reiser

  9. Sep 2017
  10. Jun 2017
  11. Mar 2017
    1. Star Legacy by the Vanderbilt LearningTechnology Center, 4-Mat by McCarthy,instructional episodes by Andre, multipleapproaches to understanding by Gardner,collaborative problem solving by Nelson,constructivist learning environments byJonassen, and learning by doing by Schank.

      Something to investigate...

      especially "multiple approaches to understanding by Gardner"

  12. Feb 2017
  13. Jan 2017
  14. May 2016
    1. Wiggins and McTighe’s solutions—backward design, sharing detailed rubrics with students, etc.—are certainly the right way to do teacher-centered, standards-driven education based on measurable outcomes.

      I've been wondering for a long time about ID, UbD and the like as they fit in with open educational practices and open pedagogy. It seems like they're closed in a way, in that the the goals, the way they're defined and the means to getting there are all defined for the learner. But if we really want to help people grow and be all they can be, we have to cede control to the learners, so they can start to define their own goals, and find out how to set their own paths.

  15. Dec 2015
    1. course design is more important than the LMS

      In all the platform news, we can talk about “learning management” in view of instructional and course design. But maybe it even goes further than design into a variety of practices which aren´t through-designed.

  16. Jan 2015
    1. We strongly prefer our own term, knowledge-building community. It suggests continuity with the other knowledge-building communities that exist beyond the schools, and the term building implies that the classroom community works to produce knowledge - a collective product and not merely a summary report of what is in individual minds or a collection of outputs from group work.

      This fits with the open/closed scale for judging learning environments.