50 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
    1. When in need of help, students reread directions, checkwith Home-Group members (3-4 students who are inschool or at home on the same days), check the digitalPeer Expert Board, and then put their name on the digitalHelp Board

      This is a fantastic idea for building community.

      Facilitate in Google? Allow edits on a Canvas page? What about multiple editors?

      • Google Slides parking lot embedded on the homepage
        • Each student has a slide they edit
        • General questions slide for help requests
    2. Curate an instructional plan forstudents, whether at home orschool, that will addresscognitive, learning style, andcultural differences.

      I don't remember where it was, but someone suggested a 5:1 prep:teach time ratio. Spend far more time prepping (researching, finding resources, etc) than you do actually teaching students verbally so you have several items to incorporate or fall back on.

    3. Students continue working ondifferentiated learning activities.(Remote only? Hold discussionswith half of the class at a time.)

      Sounds like great use of a fishbowl model.

    4. socially-distanced in-school students andat-home students can join

      Use the tools that are available to make the in-person material as accessible as possible to the at home students.

      • iPad as a document camera
      • AirServer to the board, share screen to Meet

      Repeat the sessions on A/B days? One day per week for these sessions?

    5. students may connect and workwith others at home or in schoolvia videoconferencing.

      Could students use breakout Google Meet rooms during their off day to work together? Teachers could facilitate which ones are open at which times for students or rotate into those as the groups (or individuals) in person are working.

    6. Students access an Activity List

      Weekly planning is critical. This helps the teacher provide consistent, supportive instruction and it helps the student regulate their work.

      Having minimesters this term will help students focus.

    7. indicate they arepresent

      What are some simple ways to indicate they're present?

      • Google Form with email automatically collected?
      • Canvas survey with a simple get to know you question?

      Something independent that can build self-regulation skills and habits.

    8. I recommend a cloud-baseddocument where students can post their thoughts or comments (in-school and at-home students) so thatthe teacher can follow the discussion

      Backchanneling - or doing something like a remote fishbowl discussion - can help facilitate the physical gap for students at home vs in class.

      • How can we explore bringing in home/school students at the same time? Try with the ambassadors?
    9. Time with the teacher “live” shifts to these Small-Group, Mini-Lessons and live discussions whereteachers can engage students in collectively grappling with content.

      Time is spent talking with one another, not a teacher talking at a group of students.

      Separate yourself out of time constraints by providing familiar instruction materials (ie, video) ahead of the small group meeting so the group time is as effective and focused as possible.

    10. Whole-class lessons across video, sometimes called “live streaming,” are not effective -- I won’teven sugar-coat that

      There are too many unknown factors involved in expecting every student, in vastly different home situations, to engage equally in a given situation.

    11. Teachers need to avoid reserving in-school days for lessons andteacher talk, thus, robbing students of the socialization skills they are craving

      When you're together, it's time to listen to what students are saying rather than talking at them even more.

      see Dan Meyer: https://blog.mrmeyer.com/2020/but-artichokes-arent-pinecones-what-do-you-do-with-wrong-answers/

    12. We cannot afford to depend on in-school time for lessons and at-home time only forpractice.

      This is a remnant of the old model of schooling which needs to be foregone in favor of better models, more suited to flexible learning environments.

    13. The key to a successful hybrid learning environment is implementing structures and strategiesthat work as well at home as they do in school, such that learning continues whether at home orat school -- no need for a change in methods with a change in setting

      These should be based on skills students already have or which can be developed independently (or with limited, in person support).

      • How does this align with ECS PRIDE?
  2. Nov 2019
    1. Main objective of this research is to explore e-learning system components needs among students of collegesof education (one year Bachelor of Education or B.Ed. degree programme) affiliated by University of Mysore, India. Needs assessment is one of the main investigative tools used by institutions to the identification of actual needs, gaps, and hidden parts in the system and other activities.

      This research journal was conducted by a faculty member of the University of Mysore, India. The overall purpose of the paper was to determine if the needs of students varied depending on the following: gender, scholarship, subject matter. Useful information outlined in the article pertained to defining e-learning and its components, review of needs assessment basics, and the findings and outcomes. The information and findings highlighted by Azimi provide reinforcement on the importance of having proper needs assessments to ensure quality learning programs are developed. (Rating: 4/10)

    1. we will discuss how learner-centered collaborative learning should be designed to improve these models using the example of a global online MBA course at Anaheim University. Using international economics as the subject matter, we will closely examine innovative collaborative learning strategies which are vital in cultivating highly active, engaging and applied learning in global economic classrooms in the 21st century.

      At a conference in Santa Barbara; representing University of Los Angeles, Barbara Son delivered a segment on three core strategies to include in e-learning environments; environments with a rich amount of technology. The three main things included tools that were flexible, pedagogical techniques that innovative, and integrated collaborative learning. The three broad strategies covered were referenced in other annotated sources; serving as validation due to re-occurring discussions and findings. The information outlined in this source if highly valuable due to many different examples of tools to be used are provided. (Rating: 7/10)

  3. Mar 2019
    1. 5 technology enabled learning trends in 2017 This article was produced by a credible publisher and is included here because it points to the need for both mobile learning and micro learning. The authors assert but do not provide data for the increasing need for microlearning. This form of learning is said to be important because it is associated with the real world. Rating 4/5

    1. This is a list of different types of mobile learning software. It seems that different categories are included, such as LMSs. I can't evaluate the products but I will note that this list would be far more helpful if they clarified what each of the software tools is supposed to do. At this point, I do not have competing lists, so I will include it for now. rating 1/5

    1. This is a round-up article that describes four apps that employees can use for mobile learning. The apps are Udemy, Skill Pill, Designjot, and BoostHQ. It is not appropriate for me to evaluate the information quality; however, this particular source (eLearning industry) generally produces accurate articles. rating 4/5

    1. This is specific to Articulate Rise 360 (a rapid development tool) and features brief posts that keep the reader up to date on software changes, which are made frequently. Only a portion of each comment is visible on the main page (just as only a portion of an email is visible without clicking the email) but the subject heading is usually sufficient to describe the content of the post. rating 3/5

    1. This is associated with the e-learning development tool "Articulate Storyline." There are frequent blog posts and they are not limited to or exclusive to the Articulate products. Posts are brief and not all of the content will be new, but there are worthwhile tips to be had and they combine theory (not to the extent that an academic would) with practice. rating 3/5

    1. Participate in eLearning Learning

      This page is set up like a Pinterest page. There are changing (not necessarily completely current) articles on various aspects of e-learning for adults. The page is laid out in a sufficiently attractive manner and the page seems relevant to those who are training adult learners. This is not the best site to visit if one has a specific need in mind but could be used well by someone who has a few minutes and wants to browse. Rating 3/5

    1. This is here in part to make sure that one of my bookmarks is the E-learning Guild. They offer an executive summary on 'creating accessible eLearning: practitioner perspectives" for free at this page. The entire document is available to members. Rating 3/5

  4. Feb 2019
    1. "Online and face-to-face are delivery modes; they are not course designs," she wrote. "To say that online courses are alike because they are online is like saying that rocky road ice cream and tater tots are the same because you find them in the freezer section.

      Exactly (and...LOL)

  5. Jan 2019
    1. A Rubric for Evaluating E-Learning Tools in Higher Education

      The Rubric for E-Learning Tool Evaluation offers educators a framework, with criteria and levels of achievement, to assess the suitability of an e-learning tool for their learners' needs and for their own learning outcomes and classroom context.

  6. Nov 2018
    1. This article takes a different perspective on technological integration, showing that sometimes technology, when used improperly, can set a class backwards.Examples in the article clearly show that effective use of technology is extremely important, otherwise the technology may cause more problems than it offers solutions.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article takes the perspective that education should not necessarily be solely focused on educational experiences, as we tend to do. Rather, technology should also have a focus in supporting non-academic areas and using data to drive instruction.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This research takes an interesting look into the role gender plays in self-efficacy in technology. The research finds that self-efficacy in technology was primarily effected by gender and gender roles, not specifically by biological sex.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Several problems and barriers to technological integration are often included in the discussion about using technology in higher education, however it is less common that solutions are presented. This article proposes solutions for transforming educational technology through personalized experiences and collaboration.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article suggests that perhaps keeping updated and informed on technology can prevent the shut-down and closure of specific degrees and the departments they come from. Technology is constantly changing, and it is expected that institutions will change with it. Rating: 7/10

    1. Early Attrition among First Time eLearners: A Review of Factors that Contribute to Drop-out, Withdrawal and Non-completion Rates of Adult Learners undertaking eLearning Programmes

      NEW - This study researches dropout rates in eLearning. There are many reasons for attrition with adult eLearners which can be complex and entwined. The researched provide different models to test and also a list of barriers to eLearning - where technology issues ranked first. In conclusion, the authors determined that further research was necessary to continue to identify the factors that contribute to adult learner attrition.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. This article stuck me immediately as a former K-12 teacher who now works in higher education. Andragogy and Pedagogy are both extremely similar and unalike in many ways. It is important to understand technological styles in pedagogy, as this article demonstrates, in order to effectively apply similar principles in the higher education setting.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This site includes five highly effective technological resources that instructors can use in their higher ed classrooms. What is especially useful about this site is that it includes a rationale for all the proposed technologies, ensuring that the technology is not just including in lesson planning for technology's sake.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. We often talk about avoiding the use of technology for technology's sake and ensuring here is relevance in the integration. This site lays out specific characteristics of effective technologies in the classroom.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This site gives a thorough overview into the integration of technology in the classroom. The most helpful element it includes is a list of limitations to consider within this integration. The downside is you will have to "dig" a little through the article to find the solutions to these problems, as they are not immediately obvious. Rating: 8/10

    1. 9 themes to explore the multiple ways that Pockets of Innovation are developed and adopted for each of these applications and link to examples from Ontario, Canada and around the world.

      A broad range of publications that present examples of good practices in several aspects of online teaching and learning throughout Canada and around the world.

    1. Today's students grew up in a world where technology is a natural part of their environment. Their expectation is that technology is used whenever appropriate to help them learn, develop essential informational and technological literacy skills, and master the fluency necessary in their specific subject domain.

      This article shares relevant information about pedagogy trends and how such is being shaped by the integration of technology within the teaching and learning experience. It highlights key elements contributing to the development of this 'new' pedagogy, its impact on instructional delivery and course design, as well as three emerging pedagogy trends. Great source for faculty interested in distance education.

      9/10

    1. Both of these learning theories have a place in the spectrum of adult learning for the next generation of learners, however, with the increasing influence of social media and other connecting forces, and with the advent of Smartphone technology, communities are emerging where a clustering occurs of similar affinities (areas of interest), coupled with technology that is allowing an open environment of interaction, sharing, dialoguing and thinking together (Siemens, 2005).

      This article provides comparisons and contrasts between andragogy and transformative learning theory. It examines how the next generation of adults will learn, interact and share, therefore creating a more customized learning experience and adding personal meaning to the lives of the learners. 8/10

    1. Some of the problems with e-learning can be solved through engaging users in a more creative and motivational way.

      This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of emerging technology being integrated into the online learning environment. With people driving the changes in technology, learning will become more accessible, anywhere and at any time for motivate adult learners.

      7/10

    1. Success in online learning comes about by understanding the needs as well as the readiness of major players in the online learning environment.

      This paper attempts to identify an appropriate assessment tool for learner and faculty readiness in order to develop a successful e-learning environment, where learning and teaching is actively fostered and supported by each stakeholder (administration, student, faculty) involved.

      8/10

    1. 17 Tips To Motivate Adult Learners

      The author highlights 17 useful tips for motivating adult e-learners. The tips are primarily based upon learning principles, and encourages the use of technology to facilitate collaborations, discussions, sharing, engagement and active learning. Ultimately assisting the learner with navigating the learning space with better interest.

      7/10

    1. In designing the area we were keen to avoid a technology-driven approach; wewanted to promote interactive and feedback-driven learning experiences. To thisend our focus was on interactive content and assessment.

      The "e-learning - an Introduction" chapter presents a case study of using VLE tools to promote feedback-driven learning experiences. Meaningful feedback is really important for any learning environment, it's valuable tool for educator to assess the effectiveness of learning materials and improve teaching and learning process.

      Rating: 7/10

  7. Jul 2018
  8. Nov 2017
  9. Feb 2017
  10. Nov 2015