109 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
  2. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Articulate what they know; 2. reflect on what they have learned; 3. support the internal negotiation of meaning making; 4. construct personal representations of meaning; and 5. support intentional, mindful thinking

      what technology should do in an online course to reach adults

    2. Since online learning has a different setting from the conventional classroom,online educators need to use some special techniques and perceptions to leadto success. Moreover, adults have special needs and requirements as learnerscompared with children and adolescents, thus online educators should knowhow adults can learn best because of their special characteristics. Philosophicaland methodological shifts also affect instruction. Many researchers havesuggested that constructivism should be applied in distance education. Thus,this paper attempts to examine the impact of constructivism in online learningenvironments when focusing on adult learners. The author develops the con-nection between constructivism and adult learning theory. In addition, thepaper proposes instructional guidelines using the constructivist approach inonline learning for adults.
  3. s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Workplace-relatedlearningis learning that is related to the firm in which the learner is employed and that is supported at least to some extent by their employer, but that is notfoundationalor higher education. Individuals may engage in this type of learning for the purposeof learning a new job, improving their job performance, for professional development, as an employee benefit or because it is required by legislation.
    2. Key dimensions of adult learning activities

      form, provider, payer, purpose, duration, design, delivery, instructor quality, credential

    3. Fivebroad types of adult learning

      Adult learning types including Foundational, higher education, workplace, personal, social. Includes a list of examples of the types of learning this includes in each category.

    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
    1. Author Tom Vander Ark, also author of Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World, brings a reflection of what ends up being 10 trends and 10 suggestions on how to develop impact in relation to the trends. The article is straight forward in the trends, but also does offer platform and educational examples to enhance the content.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article discusses adult learners who connected with industry professionals in a career exploration course that focused around technology and coding. The program is hoping to show other places that focus on adult learning a model that would work for adult learners to gain access to industry.

      Rating: 6/10. Interesting article, but not really a focus on how they effectively engaged the adult learns in the program or their approach to actually developing the course and curriculum.

  4. Mar 2019
    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. This article discusses that technology rich classroom research is lacking in the research world. This paper created a scale in which it could evaluate classroom environments. The authors tested this scale and determined it was a good starting framework for how to improve classroom environments. This scale could be useful later in class when evaluating technologies.Rating 9/10 for help assessment techniques

    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

  5. eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu eds.a.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. The purpose of this book is to help learners plan ,develop and deliver online training programs for adults in the workplace. This book can be understood as a guide for training managers, instructional designers, course developers and educators who are looking to transition from classroom material to self-paced instructional programs.The main purpose of this book is for people who deliver training programs to be able to design programs for online. Most importantly, the learners needs are addressed in development. Rating 7/10 material is interesting and relevant but slightly outdated.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. What Makes for Effective Adult Learning

      This article provides a short overview or strategies and techniques to make adult learning effective. This article quotes adult learning researches like Knowles to provide information about meaningful learning experiences. This article provides idea for activities that fit in the category of affective adult learning.

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. 4Vision: Preparing Learning Communities to succeed in College and Careers in a global society through technology.Vision and Goals

      This proposal outlines a draft for a technology plan for Arizona regarding adult education. This plan outlines the goals of the plan and how Arizona can address them moving forward. This plan outlines trends for the future in technology and acknowledges challenges that might come up later down the line. This plan also reviews teaching standards and instruction, as well as operations for the future. Rating 6/10 for being a draft, but with good ideas!

    1. Online is clearly where the growth is, especially when it comes to enrolling adults.

      This article is based around the idea that online education increases access for learners but lacks in completion data. This article provides data around the United States from a study conducted over a few years. Generally speaking this article encourages blended learning rather than all online to obtain better outcomes for adult learners. Rating 7/10 for use of graphs and evidence from data.

    1. Adult students have a higher incidence of disability and are less likely to seek accommodations than the general student population, so it is critical that institutions of higher education anticipate their needs, especially in online classes.

      This article provides statistics about the number of adult learners who learn online with a disability and how these numbers need to be addressed. The author observes that adult learning are least likely to ask for help and it's the designers job to assess their work to make it more accessible. This article provides recommendations on how to become more familiar with technology and what guidelines people should be following. Rating: 10/10 for addressing accessibility among adult learners and providing recommendations.

    1. This article reviews three learning styles and gives examples of how they fit into the three learning domains. Additionally this article reviews assumptions about adult learning and what it might actually mean. Lastly, this article reviews the instructional system design model and breaks down it's components. Rating 7/10 for lack of discussion but helpful tables

    1. This fact sheet provides an overview of adult learning theories in a digestible format with citations throughout the sheet. The citations are from various experts on adult learning theory and examples are provided as well. Rating: 8/10 Clear and concise overview of adult learning theories.

    1. This article focuses on the adult learning environment from the teachers perspective. This article explains that there are many types of environments an adult learner experiences and why each of them are important. After reviewing the environments, the author provides recommendations from a professional perspective. Rating: 8/10 for providing an in-depth overview of different learning environments and how they apply to adult learners.

    1. This page is free resource to download a book about how people learn. This selected chapter provides recommendations for assessments and feedback in learning environments in general which also applies to adult learning. In addition to these examples, this chapter provides a section on theory and framework to better understand the overall topics. Rating: 10/10 Great free, open source resource with reputable information about learning.

    1. Active learning approaches

      This website is a blog hosted on an official EU platform that discusses what quality learning environments look like for adults. This webpage reviews traditional learning approaches versus active learning approaches how they contribute to a quality learning environment. Rating: 6/10 for including an easy to read comparison table but lacking in discussion.

    1. The “silver surfer” discourse reinforces the notion that older adults stand to benefit from ICTs in various ways, and that the ability to make use of new technology is a ready means through which to “bridge the generation gap”

      This article refers to an older generation of adults and how the intend to adopt technologies or why they choose not too. The author discusses how researchers know very little about the outcomes of older adults using technology and how it impacts their lives. Additionally, this article provides recommendations for how to accommodate older generations through the use of information and communications technologies. Rating: 8/10 for focus on a different class of adults

    1. The purpose of this paper is to propose an in-structional-design theory that supports a sense of community.

      This article addresses the fact that new instructional design theories and methods are needed to keep up with new technologies and ways of learning. This article reviews instructional design tools for creating a sense of community online for learners. Additionally, this article discusses the differences between design theory and descriptive theory as it pertains to instructional design. 6/10 This article is very specific and might only be relevant for a specific study or topic

    1. The project reported here aimed to highlight the advantages and weaknesses of web‐based learning for adults with learning disability, and to suggest improvements.

      This article reviews challenges faced by adult learners with learning disabilities as it related to online learning. This article discusses how adults with learning disabilities might not adopt new technologies in a productive way and highlights positive and negative aspects of this scenario. Additionally the author provides solutions to identify advantages and disadvantages of online learning for adults. Rating: 9/10 for addressing accessibility and disability concerns among adult learners.

    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Engaging  Adult  Learners

      This article discusses some attributes that are unique to adult learners, such as that their learning is selective, self-directed, and often focused on solving problems. Therefore, it is important that instructors enable students to be autonomous and show them why it is important. Often in my instructional design, I start with the WIIFM (What's In It For Me?). This article supports my idea that my adult learners will choose to learn when it can solve a problem for them. This article also discusses active learning from an adult perspective, such as Socratic teaching. 9/10

    1. What the Research Says About Teaching Adults

      Colorado Community Colleges published this article to discuss research about teaching adults, focusing strongly on Knowles's six principles of andragogy. The main idea behind Knowles's principles is that adults learn because they decided to--because the information is relevant to them and they can benefit from attaining that knowledge. Therefore, the article states, activities that ask adult learners to discuss problems with each other will help them learn. This can be useful as I design instruction. 7/10

    1. Adult Learning Theory

      This article by the University of Utah discusses Lindeman's and Knowles's theories on adult learning. Andragogy uses the teacher differently from pedagogy: the teacher in an adult learning environment becomes a facilitator instead of the knower. I think this is an important distinction to make for people who go from teaching children to teaching adults. There are two of these people on my team at work. One taught third grade and one taught sixth grade, and both of them tend to try to put the instructor in the knower's position instead of the facilitator's position. They have to catch themselves often and rework some instruction to be more student-focused instead of content-focused. 8/10

    1. As one understands professional development in educational technology as potential transformational learning experiences, one can begin to reconceptualize its outcomes.

      This article provides an in-depth view from the teachers perspective about how to prepare for technology in their learning environments. Through professional development training, teachers and instructors can gain new knowledge about how to incorporate new technologies into their practice. This article focuses on one study and concludes that new technology needs to be introduced slowly for best practices.

    1. one main goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner.

      This article takes on Adult Learning from an Instructional Design perspective. This article reviews 3 adult learning theories and why it's important for Instructional Designers to keep these theories in mind the facilitate the learning process. Rating: 9/10 for easy reading, overview of learning theories and emphasis on instructional design

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. This webpage discusses different learning styles for adults, the principles of adult learning theory and different instructional design models for the the present and future. This webpage reviews andragogy and adult learning theory from the works of Malcolm Knowles. This article comes from Rutgers University and provides additional resources for adult learners. Ratings: 7/10 for helpful, short overview

    1. macro to micro learning: how to transform your course library This short article has limited utility because of its lack of breadth and reading is a bit difficult because of the small gray typeface. Nonetheless it is a current article that provides a few tips for those who seek to have a greater number of micro learning opportunities among their professional development offerings. rating 2/5

    1. This is a reasonable list of Knowles' assumptions about adult learners -- not as complete or nuanced as one might find in a textbook, but worth having a look at when starting a new project. rating: 3/5

    1. While there are many pages that somehow 'address' adult learning, I found few insightful as I reviewed them. This page is a bit different though as it does integrate transformational learning into adult learning theory and also has a different presentation of Knowles' work that is found on many other web pages. Rating 5/5

  6. Nov 2018
    1. This article takes a different perspective on technological integration, showing that sometimes technology, when used improperly, can set a class backwards.Examples in the article clearly show that effective use of technology is extremely important, otherwise the technology may cause more problems than it offers solutions.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article takes the perspective that education should not necessarily be solely focused on educational experiences, as we tend to do. Rather, technology should also have a focus in supporting non-academic areas and using data to drive instruction.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This research takes an interesting look into the role gender plays in self-efficacy in technology. The research finds that self-efficacy in technology was primarily effected by gender and gender roles, not specifically by biological sex.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Several problems and barriers to technological integration are often included in the discussion about using technology in higher education, however it is less common that solutions are presented. This article proposes solutions for transforming educational technology through personalized experiences and collaboration.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article suggests that perhaps keeping updated and informed on technology can prevent the shut-down and closure of specific degrees and the departments they come from. Technology is constantly changing, and it is expected that institutions will change with it. Rating: 7/10

    1. Facilitating Adult Learning Through Computer-Mediated Distance Education

      This is an interesting article to discover the history of adult learning technology in a hybrid setting. The study included both face-to-face and online meetings/assignments.

    1. English Teachers' Barriers to the Use of Computer-assisted Language Learning

      This article discusses the use of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) technologies to teach English. Each stage of learning aligns with a level of computer technology. There are also many barriers that impede the process of integrating the CALL into the classroom, which include financial, access to hardware and software, teacher training, technical knowledge, and acceptance of technology.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. IMPACTS OF LEARNING STYLES AND COMPUTER SKILLS ON ADULT STUDENTS’ LEARNING ONLINE

      This article explores how learning styles and computer skills impact student online learning. Further consideration is also given to course format and participants who were first time online learners. This is a complex study that investigates possible skills and abilities of first time online students. It would be interesting to conduct the same study, ten years latter to see if the changes in technology has improved the learners' computer skills and therefore the results of the study.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. Preceptors must create an environment that is friendly to novice nurses and conducive to perioperative nurse education, particularly in light of the current nursing shortage. Effective teachers use principles of adult learning to facilitate the education of new employees. This results in increased satisfaction for preceptors, preceptees, other staff members, and ultimately, patients.

      The article focuses on adult learning in the medical profession. It is a different perspective than a traditional subject and shows how much education effects all the student comes in contact with in their career.

      8/10

    2. Creating an environment conducive to adult learning

      Creating a conducive adult learning environment is an article directed to training nurses in a clinical setting, but it can also be applied to any other learning environment. It identifies the responsibilities of the preceptor (instructor) and the preceptee (learner) and the best means for parceling out duties to the learners.<br> The recommended process of assigning tasks to start with a single task and have the learner participate in parts of the medical procedure until the complete task has been practiced. The concept of repetition is also identified as an important tool for learning a given task. The task of correcting or counseling a student is also discussed. These principles are applicable to all learning situations and can be adapted to fit the specific area of training.

      RATING: 10/10

    1. Adult learners face numerous challenges that include changing definitions, overcoming circumstances, relearning, and motivation. Addressing these challenges in a timely and personal way is especially important in distance learning environments. This roundtable will discuss how WGU addresses these challenges and prepares educators in a manner independent of place and time.

      This article discusses ways to help adults in distance learning environments. The panelists are university workers sharing how they address the issues.

    1. The paper argues that the adult learning environment can in some instances be a ‘double-edged sword’, in that it can both enhance and limit student engagement.

      This article is about a study performed on both students and teachers about the adult learning environment and the pro and cons. They call it a "double edge sword" because there are different positives and drawbacks.

    1. This site includes five highly effective technological resources that instructors can use in their higher ed classrooms. What is especially useful about this site is that it includes a rationale for all the proposed technologies, ensuring that the technology is not just including in lesson planning for technology's sake.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. We often talk about avoiding the use of technology for technology's sake and ensuring here is relevance in the integration. This site lays out specific characteristics of effective technologies in the classroom.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This is scholarly article that shares research findings in questions such as, to what extent is there a relationship between faculty's comfortableness with technology and perception of technology integration and student success? The data is very interesting, including the fact that students in the sample reported being most proficient with a printer and least proficient with a smarboard. This definitely indicates a shift in what technological knowledge a professor will need verses their students.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Our Sample Professional Development (PD) Activity Collection is designed to serve as a resource to PD providers creating training events both for practicing educators and beginning teachers engaged in induction experiences. In this collection, users will find examples of the ways in which information about evidence-based practices,

      The page has a template, activities, and resources instructors can use to help create professional development courses. Rating: 4/5

    1. Teachers often attend professional development that does not pertain to them and what they do. This article looks into various adult learning theories that can be implemented to make professional development more meaningful for the teachers. These learning theories are action learning, experiential learning, project based learning, and self-directed learning. The article recommends blending the different adult learning theories to create a professional development teachers will find relevant to them. The article also states leadership helps direct the relevance of the professional development. Different leadership styles are highlighted and how it helps improve professional development. Rating: 5/5

  7. teacherlink.ed.usu.edu teacherlink.ed.usu.edu
    1. This article looks at several adult learning theories. The theories are: age and stage, cognitive development, and functional, Age and stage theory sates that a learner's age and stage of development plays a part in they way they learn. Cognitive development is when learning goes from concrete to more abstract and learning is intrinsic. Functional theory is when learning problem centered and self directed. Rating: 5/5

    1. In addition to discussing Knowles Andragogy learning theory this article also looks into two other adult learning theories: experiential and transformational. For learning to be successful in adults instructional designers need to "tap into prior experiences," "create a-ha moments," and "create meaning" by connecting to reality. Rating: 5/5

    1. In this case study the instructional designers used a contextualized model of active learning to provide professional learning to teachers in urban alternative high schools. The teachers were given reading assignments, activities that were relevant and engaging to them, and time to reflect at the end of the session. The participants enjoyed the "learner-centered" model of professional development and found it effective and worth to their learning. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article looks into the different ways technology can be incorporated into adult learning. These methods include technology as curriculum, technology as delivery mechanism, technology as complement to instruction, and technology as an instructional tool. The benefits and limitations of each method is also discussed. Rating: 4/5

    2. This site gives a thorough overview into the integration of technology in the classroom. The most helpful element it includes is a list of limitations to consider within this integration. The downside is you will have to "dig" a little through the article to find the solutions to these problems, as they are not immediately obvious. Rating: 8/10

  8. www.ijbhtnet.com www.ijbhtnet.com
    1. This article highlights how the constructive teaching model can be used to incorporate technology in learning. To do this learning has to be meaningful to the students and should allow for student discourse to compare ideas and modify if necessary. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article gives us seven tips on how to create a successful learning environment for adults. The takeaway from this article is that adults understand who they are. They are intrinsically motivated and want their learning to be purposeful. Ratings: 4/5

    1. This article discusses the main points of Malcolm Knowles main ideas of adult learning. It also mentions the different styles of learning. Additionally. the ADDIE instructional model is described. I properly constructed the ADDIE model helps merge and implement the different learning styles and needs of the adult learner. Ratings: 3/5

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Transformation for adults in an Internet-based learningenvironment—is it necessary to be self-directed?

      REDIRECT to this URL Tranformation for adults

      This study explores transformative learning theory (TLT) for adults in the Internet-base learning environment and questions the need for students to be self-directed. The study also includes the Constructivist Internet-based Learning Environment Scale (CILES). The Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale(SDLRS) as modified by Chang (2006) was used to meet the cultural needs of the participants. In conclusion, the results have a high reliability factor and add quantitative research to previous qualitative studies.<br> Further discussion is suggested regarding the technical and emancipatory learning interests on adult online learners.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. Mobile Based User-Centered Learning Environment for Adult Absolute Illiterates

      This study reviewed the education of absolute illiterates globally. It was based on the creation of game-based learning (GBL) which provides a user-friendly learning platform with little cost and little intimidation for the learner. The research also identified 60% of the world's illiterate population residing in rural areas with little access to computers and educational centers. The GBL environments created real world environments that allow learners to practice real-life scenarios in familiar surroundings using 3-D technology. The study also adapted a English language program to meet the needs of various languages. The context of the game is a farmer and a wife then acquire items and count them in their native language. The numbers used in counting are spoken and the game produces the correlating number so the learner becomes familiar with the written form of the letter. In conclusion, the participants identified that the mobile learning was more beneficial than PC applications due to unreliable electrical service at home. The mobile system was also available on demand.and applied to participants real-life usage.

      RATING: 10/10

    1. Older adult learning environment preferences

      Older adult preferences.is a dissertation preview that introduces the dissertation on preference of older adults to attend in person classes weekly for four to six hours.

      The information gleaned from this study is significant for learning designers and course structure. The study also investigated the time and location of the study, and the class make up. This information also warrants further investigation when designing courses for these adults and the success of the program. The dissertation is of value to those who are specifically involved in designing programs for older adults.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. LESSLEARNING,MORE OFTEN:THE IMPACT OF SPACINGEFFECTINAN ADULTE-LEARNINGENVIRONMENTl

      Spacing effect. of training explores the retention of learning over short and long intervals of learning, particularly in hybrid and distance learning.<br> The study was based on prior studies regarding training and retention and integrated data from the learning management system used by the participants. The study resulted in finding that smaller , more frequent learning over time appears to be more effective than the traditional presentation of mass learning. The study also concluded that much of the time participants spent in learning pertained to language acquisition of foreign language learners and/or new vocabulary.<br> It is also noted that the participants were engaged in learning to support workplace goals, which leads to highly motivated participants.

      RATING 10/10

    1. Dialogue and Difference: Facilitating Difficult Dialogues in the Adult Learning Environment

      Difficult dialogues. Although this is only the preview of the dissertation, the discussion of the role of educators in preparing students to participate in the global marketplace requires understanding of how all individuals interact with divers cultural and social environments. Often discussing important topics and differing perspectives can alleviate fear and misunderstanding. It also serves as a springboard for further investigation.

      The author identified the definitions used to conduct the research and the questions and methods employed in the study.

      The comments that society is becoming increasingly complex and that good communication is necessary to interact with understanding truly impacts educators and students alike.

    1. Self-directed learning is independent—it provides the learner with the ability to make choices, to take responsibility for their own learning, and “the capacity to articulate the norms and limits of learned society, and personal values and beliefs” (Goddu, 2012).In self-directed learning, the instructor shifts from the leader of the learning experience to the “facilitator of learning,” becoming“a source to be tapped, as required by the learner” (Robotham 1995, as cited in Goddu 2012). Self-directed learning provides students with the “opportunity and freedom to choose the means of acquiring knowledge that is best suited” to them based on their own self-knowledge (Alex et al., 2007). In online or blended environments, self-directed learning canbe offered through the creation of “dynamic learning environments where students may go beyond content presented by the instructor to explore, interact with, comment on, modify, and apply the set content and additional content they discover or create through the learning process” (LeNoue, 2011).

      This article reviews effective teaching characteristics and effective teaching methods and strategies to engage adult learners. The piece goes further in exploring five specific teaching methods to support adult learning: self-directed, active, experiential, collaborative, and narrative.

      9/10

    1. Adult Graduate Student VoicesGood and Bad Learning Experiences

      This article reviews a longitudinal study of graduate students in a Master's degree program that collected both good and bad learning experiences. The comments collect from the participants resulted in themes that were repeated throughout all three years of comments. The comments were compiled to and reviewed to determine adult student perspectives on the learning process. The authors noted that their is a need to balance suppor of students with challenging students. This is a ground work of student perspective and requires further investigation to implement appropriate changes and then review student perspective after the changes.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. The New Learning Environment and AdultDevelopmental Needs

      Identifies adult developmental learning needs. For many years, since 1911, Training at a machining company had been directed to specific tasks. After the company was sold to a new company, the education of employees changed from siloed task training to a atmosphere of learning and integrated team work. This shift in training also changed the culture of the company and built an atmosphere of one team, even across shifts and departments. This article points out how the change from task training to education that included theory of the task improved the decision making process of the employees that resulted in company improvements. Rating: 9/10

  9. content.ebscohost.com content.ebscohost.com
    1. Toward constructivism for adult learners in online learning environments

      This is an article from 2002 that identified the emerging need of online, adult learners. One concept is the use of cognitive learning theory as tools for the online learning environment.<br> Several descriptors identified who the adult online student is, primarily adult working women with full time jobs and a family (often single head of household) who are trying to return to school to improve personal circumstances.

      This article is a invitation to review the learning environment that was devised and determine if it met the needs of students then and what changes need to be implemented for today's students.

      Rating 9/10

    1. This article was found on InstructionalDesign.org. This article is about the Characteristics of Adults as Learners model. This model is designed as a guide in adult learning. The website also has sections on concepts, theories, and models.

      9/10

    1. This article is from the journal Professional Development in Education, it is a credible and relevant source. This authors analyze cases in principle professional development in four schools to find common practice. They determine if and how adult learning theory is or can be used to improve practices.

      8/10

    1. This article focuses on creating online tutorials for adult learners. Andragogy theory is used to build online programs for adult learners that are learner centered and engaging.

      8/10

    1. Adult Learning Principles and Presentation Pearls

      This article presents options for applying a variety of adult learning principles to make a course more effective. The author focuses on instrumental learning theories, humanistic learning theories, motivational models and more. Rating: 5/5

    1. Engaging Adults Learners with Technology

      This presentation features a broad overview of adult learning and defines an adult learner. Additionally, the presentation provides multiple technology resources that can be used in an adult learning environment. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article is from a education journal and is credible and relevant. It covers andragogy and transformitive learning as they can be utilized with adult learners. The focus on transformational learning theory is of particular interest.

      8/10

    1. This article was found on the website PHYS.ORG. This website covers many topics including education. The education section is where the reader will find the most relevant information and research to teaching and learning.

      7/10

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)