142 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. There would seem to be a happy confluence between constructivist ideas about learning and trends in Internet usage. Self-directed learning through a collaborative and participative environment with other students is recognised as being a good, or even the best, approach in many contexts (Guthrie et

      Yes that was the impression I hot. Because of this misconception I feel that many of us students sometimes hold... Reality is that real students feel real anxiety in the midst of sharing information.

    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

  2. dergipark.org.tr dergipark.org.tr
    1. Blueprint for In-Service Teacher Training Program in Technology Integration

      This article looks at the gap between teacher efficiency in in-person versus online teaching and the need to effectively build teachers' competencies in the are of technology to ensure teachers are not incompetent at teaching online. This study collected data from 122 English language teachers and used the findings to create a blueprint for other institutions hoping to increases teachers' ability to successfully integrate technology into their lessons. 6/10, the study was too small to be truly persuasive scientifically and the findings were more helpful for institutions rather than individual educators.

    1. Handbook of Research on Student-Centered Strategies in Online Adult Learning Environments

      This article showcases a framework for course design using theory and research in the learning sciences. It defines student-centered learning and explains how it can/ should be used in the creation of the course and when establishing which theories and methods to structure the course around. 9/10, very detailed source.

    1. The author, Stefan Hrastinski, is a Professor at the Division of Digital Learning and Director of Research Education at the Department of Learning in Engineering Sciences at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. Hrastinski notes the term "blended learning" originated in the 1990's, but is often over generalized. Hrastinski proposes several blended learning models, blended learning conceptualizations, and proposes recomendations for future research.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. We found using concise videosin multiple ways built online immediacy in positive ways. Students reported, as a whole, that they found video recordings to increase their sense of instructor immediacy and motivation in the online classroom.

      The authors discuss the problem of teacher immediacy and presence in online courses. They propose that this problem must be solved as online instruction becomes increasingly popular. The researchers survey multiple students at Weber State University and present their process, results, and communication theory. They conclude that short videos tangibly increase instructor online presence. And, short videos directed at individual students have an even greater positive impact.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Four themes emerged from analyzing three types of data: surveys, interviews, and access log files. These four themes that captured students' experience of VBL included: varying video use frequency, balancing time and level of understanding to achieve learning efficiency, manipulation of video functions to achieve learning efficiency, and reliance upon multiple tools.

      The authors of this article question the effectiveness of video-based online learning. The authors/researchers studied multiple undergraduate level online courses. Information was gathered via student surveys and interviews. The researchers present four themes found through the study, which include varying video use frequency, balancing time and level of understanding to achieve learning efficiency, manipulation of video functions to achieve learning efficiency, and reliance upon multiple tools.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. but they should be engaging, because this leads to students beingmore motivated to learn and succeed.The possibilities of how students interact with content and with each other are greatly expanded in a hybrid course; just having themread articles online and then meet to discuss themin-class, for example, takes no real advantage of a class format that can otherwise be a transformative experience.

      This article, published by the College of DuPage, gives an introduction to hybrid learning environments. The authors outline the benefits of hybrid learning, how to utilize time wisely, the student experience (both in person and online), and how to structure and plan hybrid courses.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. The authors present a study focused the differences of blended versus traditional instruction in terms of student performance. The study evaluates 53 undergraduate students enrolled in a "Physical Education in Early Childhood" course. Twenty-nine students were placed in a traditional course and 24 students were placed in a blended "experimental" group. The researchers concluded that "students who attended the course with blended instruction show higher performance."

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies: Benefits, Barriers and Lessons Learned

      In this article, the author defines Web 2.0 technology and use for Web 2.0 in higher education. Through a small study of educators, discovery includes advantages, obstacles, and general guidance for implementation of web 2.0 tools. The author supports use of Web 2.0 to supplement learning, not as a substitute for the educator. Technologies must be implemented strategically and purposefully. 7/10

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

    1. When incorporating videos into a lesson, it’s important to keep in mind the three key components of cognitive load, elements that impact engagement, and elements that promote active learning.

      The author, Cynthia Brame, is the Associate Director of the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching and holds a Ph.D. in Education. In this article Brame recognizes the importance video has become in online and blended instruction. Brame suggests three things to consider when designing and implementing videos, which include cognitive load, non-cognitive elements that impact engagement, and features that promote active learning.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. Cognitive Presence “is the extent to which learners are able to construct and confirm meaning through sustained reflection and discourse” (Community of Inquiry, n.d, para. 5). Video is often used as a unidirectional medium with information flowing from the expert or instructor to the learner. To move from transmission of content to construction of knowledge, tools such as Voice Thread (VoiceThread, 2016) support asynchronous conversation in a multimedia format.

      The author, Kendra Grant, is the Director of Professional Development and Learning for Quillsoft in Toronto Canada. Grant helps business succeed in education design and support. In this article Grant discusses how quickly the learning environment has changed through technological development. Grant explores the RAT Model, which guides instructors in the "use of technology to help transform instructional practice." Grant then examines the Community of Inquiry model, which seeks to create meaningful instruction through social, cognitive and teaching presence. Grant concludes by providing general principles for creating a positive video presence.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Multimedia principle. Providing words with pictures, images, or other graphics enhances learning relative to materials that include only words. While this principle pertains to texts with pictures, it also applies to videos, which include audio and video components.2. Modality principle. When combining visual and verbal materials, it is more effective to use audio than it is to use written text. Videos may be more effective when they present video in conjunction with audio narration as opposed to written text in the video.3. Contiguity principle. Multimedia materials are more effective when words and pictures/images/graphics occur in close proximity relative to when they do not occur in close proximity.4. Redundancy principle. Eliminating redundancy enhances the effectiveness of multimedia. For example, text may be redundant with audio narration, and such redundant text should be eliminated.5. Coherence principle. Adding flashy but unnecessary illustrations to multimedia can be distracting, reducing coherence and thereby reducing learning.6. Personalization principle. Using a conversational style (e.g., in narration) can be more beneficial relative to a more formal presentation style.

      This article compiles research into educational videos with respect to SDL (although SDL is never mentioned directly). The authors discuss the impact of educational videos, student engagement, the role of critical thinking and knowledge development, and effective design and presentation.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Considering that one of the most significant factors of online course quality is instructor presence and interpersonal interaction,4 one of the benefits video can offer is creating faculty presence in an online environment. In the interviews, students cited faculty presence as a key factor related to their engagement and perceived learning from videos. Humor and wit were described positively. Participants also mentioned the benefits of adding personable context to a subject; for instance, faculty members giving examples from their professional experiences about subject material. As one student explained, "The reading is very didactic or academic, but the videos are very real-case scenarios. The instructor narrates: 'How do you take that academic learning into the real world? What does that mean when you're looking at these financial statements?'" Another participant offered: "[The videos] are better than just reading the material because it has more of that human element."

      Melanie Hibbert, the Director of Instructional Media & Technology and Media Center at Barnard College in New York City, writes about what is necessary for good online instructional videos. Hibbert discusses media at Columbia University, methods for creating videos, an what analytics tell us. She concludes by describing the importance of instructor presence more so than the production quality of videos.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. Creating an Effective Online InstructorPresence

      This article was published by the Community College Research Center Teacher's College at Columbia University in New York City. The article examines what an effective online instructor looks like. The authors discuss how research indicates online instructors "make minimal use of interactive technologies." They then outline how instructors can use lectures, homework assignments, discussion boards, chat sessions, and lab activities in an interactive online course.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Online learning, blended learning, flipped learning, hybrid learning, flexible learning, open learning and distance education are all terms that are often used inter-changeably, but there are significant differences in meaning. More importantly, these forms of education, once considered somewhat esoteric and out of the mainstream of conventional education, are increasingly taking on greater significance and in some cases becoming mainstream themselves. As teachers and instructors become more familiar and confident with online learning and new technologies, there will be more innovative methods developing all the time.

      The author, Anthony Bates, holds a BA in Psychology and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration. He holds over 40 years of teaching experience. In this chapter he proposes online learning is a mode of delivery versus a teaching method. In this chapter Bates compares teaching delivery methods, defines which mode students need, and weighs in on the choice between face-to-face and online teaching.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

    1. There was also opportunity to connect with other students.

      I'm glad you had at least a little bit of this. The system I saw used for third graders left almost zero space for inter-student interaction or socialization which was a miserable experience.

    1. Strategies for Virtual Learning Environments:Focusing on Teaching Presence and TeachingImmediacy

      Through a literature review of 50 articles published between 2003-2014, the authors explored aspects of online learning (teacher presence, teacher immediacy) that impact learner interest and motivation in the online environment. Recognizing that these aspects are key, the authors explore various approaches to retention the virtual setting. The multifaceted role of the instructor is reviewed as well as virtual facilitation strategies. The literature search revealed a positive correlation between teaching presence, teaching immediacy, and learner engagement and motivation. 6/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      The author reviews assumptions of the adult learner and adult learning theory. In discussion of adult learning theories (self-directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning), the article investigates their use in online learning. Furthermore, the author provides online course development recommendations for the adult learner. A brief critique of andragogic principles is provided. Adult learning principles used in a live environment are of benefit and necessary in the virtual environment. Click "Full Text" to read article. 7/10

    1. they’ll work their asses off not to disappoint you.

      This kind of relational motivation seems like a good first step. I wonder though if "not to disappoint you" still centers the instructor and not the learners? The idea of a "partnership" between instructors and students strikes me as closer to the ideal that empathy aims for.

  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
    1. Engaging students in a three-month long project where they create their own short plays with the guidance of a workingplaywright, this festival not only allows students from St. Sylvester to explore playwriting, but to do so in collaboration with another class at a nearby Member School, St. Henry.

      Way to collaborate with places outside of the school

  5. Jun 2020
  6. May 2020
  7. Apr 2020
  8. Mar 2020
    1. Theories and Frameworks for Online Education: Seeking an Integrated Model

      This article, written by Anthony G. Picciano of City University of New York Graduate Center and Hunter College, seeks to create a theoretical framework by which to posit online education according to learning theories and their specific application. Beginning with a brief outline of the primary learning theories, the author then tries to position each theory within the online learning environment and the practical implications that follow before suggesting an integrated model that combines features of each theory. One of the primary benefits of this article is the way in which the authors show how the theories of learning might be mutated for individual, educational environmental needs. Rating: 7/10

  9. Feb 2020
  10. Nov 2019
    1. Advantages of Online Professional Development

      This chapter, "Advantages of Online Professional Development" describes the benefits of online teacher professional development (OTPD), which implements technology to deliver training and learning in an online environment. OTPD allows teachers to participate in a flexible, self-directed, and collaborative learning community. They can interact with other teachers synchronously and asynchronously, or take professional development courses at their own schedule.

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the country’s most innovative school, Arizona State University is where students and faculty work with NASA to develop, advance and lead innovations in space exploration.

      Arizona State University is one of the best university leaders nationally and around the world. They are known by providing successful online services for online learners. Educators and potential educators should explore their site for leads and their own innovation.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Private post-secondary institutions that provide educational services in the State of New Mexico are subject to either the New Mexico Post-Secondary Educational Institution Act (Section 21-23-1 et seq. NMSA 1978) or the Interstate Distance Education Act (Section 21-23B-1 et seq. NMSA 1978) and can use this site to apply for State Authorization or submit other required applications to comply with State regulations. Students may request transcripts of closed schools where the New Mexico Higher Education Department is the designated custodian of records or may file complaints against any post-secondary institution that provides educational services in our State.

      The NMHE website is about providing academic, financial and policies to new mexico public higher education institutions and community.

    1. The use of on-line instructional delivery methodscontinues to grow as technological and societal changes have enabled and encouraged this growth.

      The article was written to help the reader understand how adult learners comprehend lessons and their learning styles. The type of learning method that is used in this article is the andragogical process model (eight element process). The article is an interesting view of how the andragogical process model can be used to explore how the adult mind understands how to use online learning to educate themselves. Rating 3/5

    1. As online learning matures, it is important for both theorists and practitioners to understand how to apply new and emerging educational practices and technologies that foster a sense of community and optimize the online learning environment.

      The article expresses the design theory elements (goals, values, methods) and how it can assist with defining new tools for online learning. Rating 5/5

    1. n. Key to this model is the assumption that online education has evolved as a subset of learning in general rather than a subset of distance learning

      This article helps the reader understand the major theories that are related to technology using the leaning theories, theoretical frameworks, and models. Rate: 4/5

  11. Apr 2019
    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
  12. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Since online learning has a different setting from the conventional classroom,online educators need to use some special techniques and perceptions to leadto success. Moreover, adults have special needs and requirements as learnerscompared with children and adolescents, thus online educators should knowhow adults can learn best because of their special characteristics. Philosophicaland methodological shifts also affect instruction. Many researchers havesuggested that constructivism should be applied in distance education. Thus,this paper attempts to examine the impact of constructivism in online learningenvironments when focusing on adult learners. The author develops the con-nection between constructivism and adult learning theory. In addition, thepaper proposes instructional guidelines using the constructivist approach inonline learning for adults.
    1. This article is a study of both in-person and online courses and the affect of internet usage on the student's engaged int those courses. The article notes how saturated the learning environment has become and their approach to using student self-reported data to measure engagement. The authors provide an extensive review of prior literature on both technology and student engagement topics. The data should be reviewed with caution, as it is outlined by the authors that the questions have not been thoroughly vetted for validity and reliability.

      Rating: 6/10. The article had positive results, but the data questions being untested is a bit concerning. The article is also from 2009, and the landscape has changed much since then.

  13. Mar 2019
    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Q&A: How to Develop ‘Program Architecture’

      Discusses they ways in which Kacey Thorne of WGU, outlines plans for developing underlying competencies for online programs. Program architecture refers to the connect of skills and competencies for specific industries linking back to a network of what students will learn in school through offered programs. This is necessary for creating relevant programs that teach translatable skills for the real world after college. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. Online is clearly where the growth is, especially when it comes to enrolling adults.

      This article is based around the idea that online education increases access for learners but lacks in completion data. This article provides data around the United States from a study conducted over a few years. Generally speaking this article encourages blended learning rather than all online to obtain better outcomes for adult learners. Rating 7/10 for use of graphs and evidence from data.

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Towards a Mobile Augmented Reality Prototype for Corporate Training: A New Perspective

      Research Article. I found this article especially interesting because it promotes the use of mobile devices for online learning. This focuses on corporate training, but it is easy to see how it could be applied across areas and fields. There is a specific focus on the use of virtual and real objects during education experiences to create experience-based learning outcomes. Rating 4/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. This website is a free website that allows for users to access summaries of learning theories, educational guides and much more!

    2. This site includes links to brief discussions of more than 100 learning theories, some of which relate to technology enhanced learning. Those include gamification and online collaborative learning among others. Usability is adequate and this is sufficient for an introduction to the theories though not necessarily a nuanced understanding. rating 4/5

    1. 4 tips to implement just in time learning at your organization This article is published by Udemy so it would appear to be credible. Reading is a bit difficult because of the light font and a sales orientation can be discerned. Nonetheless it does have some useful tips such as encouraging professional developers to 'redefine how you measure learning.' rating 3/5

    1. 8 unexpected benefits of microlearning online training libraries While I am not sure that the benefits are unexpected, this does provide a list of advantages for employee driven voluntary professional development that happens via mobile devices in small doses. The usability of the page is satisfactory. rating 4/5

    1. reconceptualizing learning: a review of the literature on informal learning This is an 80 page PDF that has the support of Rutgers. It is presented in the usual manner in which reports are written. Unsurprisingly the writing is clean and accessible. The role of technology in online learning is discussed.Mentoring and communities of practice are addressed. The writing is fairly general. rating 3/5

    1. Simulations and games in informal learning contexts This article seems to discuss science learning, which is not my foremost interest, but it does give an example of how informal online learning can be used to allow the learner to explore his or her own interests. It is not specific enough to be of high value but is useful as a preliminary reading that can perhaps inform search terms to use for future research. rting 2/5

    1. This is a discussion of informal learning that focuses on ensuring that incidences of informal learning are recognized. This discussion portrays it has happening through casual conversations, online discussions, or social media. The page is easy enough to read though it does not try to be comprehensive. rating 2/5

  14. Feb 2019
    1. to expand their pedagogical repertoire

      Indeed. Just as it requires knowledge and skill to design, develop, and deliver an online learning experience, the same applies to blended learning. Making informed decisions about how to blend is deep, deep, deep.

  15. Jan 2019
    1. More and more, employers are offering professional development courses online, he noted. “Learning online is different from face-to-face, and [graduates] won’t have any experience. If the college wants students to be lifelong learners, give them the opportunity to” take virtual courses."

      This paragraph mentions that employers are offering more training online, so having online course experience will benefit students once they enter the job market, What are some other potential benefits of students learning online?

    1. Please check out Software Carpentry as well. This is a great intro that covers not just programming and data analysis (R/Python), but a lot of crucial stuff that every bioinformatician should know but usually is not covered in courses, such as Unix shell Git and version control Unit testing SQL and databases Data management and provenance I also like A Quick Guide to Organizing A Computational Biology Project for organizational techniques that usually have to be learned by experience
    1. In my opinion if you can get enrolled into a degree program for systems biology then that would be best. However, if you are just exploring the field on your own I would recommend going through these resources.Video lectures by Uri AlonVideo Lectures by Jeff GorePrinciples of Synthetic Biology (at edx)Coursera specialization on systems biology.If you are looking for mathematical intensive start with first 2 and if you are looking for biologically intensive begin with last 2. Either way go through all 4 of them as they provide diverse perspective on systems biology which is very important. As you will move through these materials all the necessary supplementary information like books, papers and softwares will be informed within these materials itself.Hope this helps!
    1. However, failure to examine the critical roleof even the inactive participants in the functioning of thecommunity is to ignore that passive (and invisible) par-ticipation may be a step toward greater participation, aswhen individuals use passivity as a way to learn aboutthe collective in a form of peripheral legitimate partici-pation (Lave and Wenger 1991, Yeow et al. 2006).

      Evokes LPP

  16. Nov 2018
    1. It is operating in a territory that offers people more concrete learning (and more interactivity) than a Netflix documentary while not being so specialized as to be a professional course.
    2. there’s just enough must-see content to keep coming back to.
    1. democratizing access to genius,

      nice tagline for masterclass

    2. whether a person could be placed into an intimate conversation – a “teaching moment” – with some of the most skilled people in the world.

      Cool question that could be turned into an USP

    1. Facilitating Adult Learning Through Computer-Mediated Distance Education

      This is an interesting article to discover the history of adult learning technology in a hybrid setting. The study included both face-to-face and online meetings/assignments.

    1. English Teachers' Barriers to the Use of Computer-assisted Language Learning

      This article discusses the use of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) technologies to teach English. Each stage of learning aligns with a level of computer technology. There are also many barriers that impede the process of integrating the CALL into the classroom, which include financial, access to hardware and software, teacher training, technical knowledge, and acceptance of technology.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. IMPACTS OF LEARNING STYLES AND COMPUTER SKILLS ON ADULT STUDENTS’ LEARNING ONLINE

      This article explores how learning styles and computer skills impact student online learning. Further consideration is also given to course format and participants who were first time online learners. This is a complex study that investigates possible skills and abilities of first time online students. It would be interesting to conduct the same study, ten years latter to see if the changes in technology has improved the learners' computer skills and therefore the results of the study.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. Adult learners face numerous challenges that include changing definitions, overcoming circumstances, relearning, and motivation. Addressing these challenges in a timely and personal way is especially important in distance learning environments. This roundtable will discuss how WGU addresses these challenges and prepares educators in a manner independent of place and time.

      This article discusses ways to help adults in distance learning environments. The panelists are university workers sharing how they address the issues.

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Transformation for adults in an Internet-based learningenvironment—is it necessary to be self-directed?

      REDIRECT to this URL Tranformation for adults

      This study explores transformative learning theory (TLT) for adults in the Internet-base learning environment and questions the need for students to be self-directed. The study also includes the Constructivist Internet-based Learning Environment Scale (CILES). The Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale(SDLRS) as modified by Chang (2006) was used to meet the cultural needs of the participants. In conclusion, the results have a high reliability factor and add quantitative research to previous qualitative studies.<br> Further discussion is suggested regarding the technical and emancipatory learning interests on adult online learners.

      RATING: 8/10