10 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
  2. Oct 2020
    1. We found using concise videosin multiple ways built online immediacy in positive ways. Students reported, as a whole, that they found video recordings to increase their sense of instructor immediacy and motivation in the online classroom.

      The authors discuss the problem of teacher immediacy and presence in online courses. They propose that this problem must be solved as online instruction becomes increasingly popular. The researchers survey multiple students at Weber State University and present their process, results, and communication theory. They conclude that short videos tangibly increase instructor online presence. And, short videos directed at individual students have an even greater positive impact.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Four themes emerged from analyzing three types of data: surveys, interviews, and access log files. These four themes that captured students' experience of VBL included: varying video use frequency, balancing time and level of understanding to achieve learning efficiency, manipulation of video functions to achieve learning efficiency, and reliance upon multiple tools.

      The authors of this article question the effectiveness of video-based online learning. The authors/researchers studied multiple undergraduate level online courses. Information was gathered via student surveys and interviews. The researchers present four themes found through the study, which include varying video use frequency, balancing time and level of understanding to achieve learning efficiency, manipulation of video functions to achieve learning efficiency, and reliance upon multiple tools.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. When incorporating videos into a lesson, it’s important to keep in mind the three key components of cognitive load, elements that impact engagement, and elements that promote active learning.

      The author, Cynthia Brame, is the Associate Director of the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching and holds a Ph.D. in Education. In this article Brame recognizes the importance video has become in online and blended instruction. Brame suggests three things to consider when designing and implementing videos, which include cognitive load, non-cognitive elements that impact engagement, and features that promote active learning.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. Multimedia principle. Providing words with pictures, images, or other graphics enhances learning relative to materials that include only words. While this principle pertains to texts with pictures, it also applies to videos, which include audio and video components.2. Modality principle. When combining visual and verbal materials, it is more effective to use audio than it is to use written text. Videos may be more effective when they present video in conjunction with audio narration as opposed to written text in the video.3. Contiguity principle. Multimedia materials are more effective when words and pictures/images/graphics occur in close proximity relative to when they do not occur in close proximity.4. Redundancy principle. Eliminating redundancy enhances the effectiveness of multimedia. For example, text may be redundant with audio narration, and such redundant text should be eliminated.5. Coherence principle. Adding flashy but unnecessary illustrations to multimedia can be distracting, reducing coherence and thereby reducing learning.6. Personalization principle. Using a conversational style (e.g., in narration) can be more beneficial relative to a more formal presentation style.

      This article compiles research into educational videos with respect to SDL (although SDL is never mentioned directly). The authors discuss the impact of educational videos, student engagement, the role of critical thinking and knowledge development, and effective design and presentation.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. Considering that one of the most significant factors of online course quality is instructor presence and interpersonal interaction,4 one of the benefits video can offer is creating faculty presence in an online environment. In the interviews, students cited faculty presence as a key factor related to their engagement and perceived learning from videos. Humor and wit were described positively. Participants also mentioned the benefits of adding personable context to a subject; for instance, faculty members giving examples from their professional experiences about subject material. As one student explained, "The reading is very didactic or academic, but the videos are very real-case scenarios. The instructor narrates: 'How do you take that academic learning into the real world? What does that mean when you're looking at these financial statements?'" Another participant offered: "[The videos] are better than just reading the material because it has more of that human element."

      Melanie Hibbert, the Director of Instructional Media & Technology and Media Center at Barnard College in New York City, writes about what is necessary for good online instructional videos. Hibbert discusses media at Columbia University, methods for creating videos, an what analytics tell us. She concludes by describing the importance of instructor presence more so than the production quality of videos.

      Rating: 9/10

  3. May 2020
  4. Mar 2016
  5. Sep 2013