36 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. E-commerce has special requirements when it comes to showing products for sale online. A uniform look and feel to the products, showing the product rather than background, product alignment, image margins and special requirements per product category characterize e-commerce.

      We have top class designers who is expert on graphics design. We provide clipping path. background remove, image retouching service. We are also expert on eCommerce photo editing.

  2. Jan 2019
  3. Nov 2018
  4. Sep 2018
    1. Beowulf

      This editor chose to keep the manuscript reading "Beowulf"; the editors of Klaeber 4 emended to "Beow." In their Commentary on line 18f (page 113), they note that "Beow" fits the meter in "Beowulf"'s second appearance at 53, and that traditional genealogies provide the name "Beow." However, I prefer the choice (as does Liuzza in his translation): whether poet or scribe, someone has made the name match that of the poem's protagonist. An earlier hero foreshadows a later.

    2. .

      Here and at 1, "Hwæt.", the edition uses periods instead of commas. Many editions and translations use exclamation points at one or both places, which changes the tone. Eric Weiskott notes that the exclamation point was hundreds of years in the future when the manuscript was written: “Making Beowulf Scream: Exclamation and the Punctuation of Old English Poetry,” Journal of English and Germanic Philology 111.1 (2012), 25–41. DOI: 10.5406/jenglgermphil.111.1.0025

  5. Feb 2018
    1. or

      "I have, in the following little volume, collected a few of these, the Love-Songs of a single province merely, which I either took down in each county of Connacht from the lips of the Irish-speaking peasantry - a class which is disappearing with most alarming rapidity - or extracted from MSS, in my own possession, or from some lent to me, made by different scribes during this century, or which I came upon while examining the piles of modern manuscript Gaelic literature that have found their last resting-place on the shelves of the Royal Irish Academy." (iv)

      The way Hyde makes reference to sources is casual and non-specific. It would be difficult for a reader to access his sources. Because we have such little insight, it is important to be alert to potential biases in the collecting and editing process.

      If we can identify consistencies among the anthologized songs in terms of their depiction of love and lovers, and/or among songs which are excluded from the anthology, we will have reason to regard the very partial disclosure of sources with suspicion.

      As I have already noted, part of Hyde’s project is to bring the reader into contact with language which has an ‘unbounded’ power to excite the Irish Muse. Perhaps part of the way he contrives this encounter is to control the kind of subject matter that will appear to the reader as that which occurs most naturally in the Irish language.

  6. Sep 2017
    1. Being from a family of retailers, one of the first things I learned was that the customer is always right. I didn’t understand the importance of that sentiment back then. But looking back, it’s probably the most important lesson I have ever learned.

      We have manually analyzed our customer reviews, in-depth interviews and on-site analytics to understand what are the customers need and how to give that to them.

  7. Aug 2017
    1. Google docs which shown in the editor can only accept “Page notes” Note that the URL of the Google doc can depend on the identify of the logged-in Google user.

      Not clear what this means?

  8. Apr 2017
    1. have continued to be eloquent pub-lic speakers, as they were in the nineteenth century,

      Uh, this is a very uncomfortable sentence. There are two possibilities, here, regarding the function of this sentence. 1) The Technically True but Terribly Vague: This is a category of opening sentence that is grammatically and intellectually fine, but also very boring. It's a cousin of "since the dawn of time," and I don't let my Rhetoric students use either type of opening line, as they are both lazy rhetoric. However, the second possibility is much more troubling: 2) This also sounds a lot like the extremely racist "black people can be very articulate."

      I know we are to the point of just beating the crap out of the editors, now, but come on. This could have been easily avoided.

  9. Mar 2017
  10. Feb 2017
    1. I figured the odds were in my favor.

      Why would the odds be in his favor if there will be more men than women? Sounds more like the deck stacked against him.

  11. Feb 2016
    1. individual choices are progressing faster than national polic

      This part isn't clear to me; I felt a little confused.

      Two questions to help clarify the meaning (briefly) :

      1. What sorts of choices?
      2. How are they progressing?

      If, by adding one or two words (or very short phrases), you can specify those two things (or both in the same shot), I think that would improve the readability for me dramatically.

    2. , who brought a snowball into the Senate, demonstrated

      I would love a source article (or video) linked here, for me to read/watch -- sounds very amusing!!

    3. hint, r

      I felt a little (slightly) uncomfortable reading this -- my brain evaluates it as a bit snarky or know-it-all-ish.

      I think I would take it more sincerely, and feel more... deep appreciation, and gratitude & resonance for the message, if the word "hint" were removed (or it were otherwise rephrased or reframed).

      While I (as a reader who likes to think of himself as intelligent and well-informed, as I think many of us do) know that recycling isn't the answer..., it's not clear to me whether the writer (and I read, think of, and receive this article as an anonymous / arbitrary speaker; not as you, Aaron, personally) knows & trust that me, his audience, knows this.

      So having some sense the person directing their message at me /trusts/ me to some degree is really important for me to feel resonance with, and trust and confidence in, the article.

    4. tly IS Climate Change? Throughout

      [this annotation is actually for the above green bar, stating: "The Oil Industry Is Certainly Willing to 'Win Ugly'"]

      It was not clear to me that that green bar with text contained a link -- I only discovered it by accident, when I moused-over it, and noticed the cursor changed to a hand. I'm not sure how to make this more apparent -- maybe add "(article here: {URL})" or somesuch?

    5. Dr. Mitloehner

      re: The photo on the right: (Sorry, I couldn't figure out how to highlight the picture, so I'm adding the annotation here.)

      I think it would be useful to add a caption (below the photo, in small / italic) describing what the photo is (e.g., "Dr. Frank Mitloehner, on his farm in...")

    6. “The dinosaurs didn’t believe in climate change either.”

      ouch.

      Reading this at the beginning, I felt a bit like I was being hit over the head with a bludgeon (not in a good way).

      My reaction: "He's attacking me! Why is he targeting me? I'm even on the same side as him!"

      Since I'm assuming (hoping?) your target audience is folks who already are confident that human industrialization has caused climate change...

      .... consider moving this caption to after the introductory paragraph (so I, reading this, know that you're not attacking nor targeting me as a reader -- but rather, I think your point is, talking about those other people who are part of the challenge that we (as readers, in this together) are facing).

      Does that any sense?

      Another possibility:

      Consider adding a header before this paragraph, along the lines of: "The Psychology of Climate Change" [optionally add: "in the US / America," if you like]

      That will give folks some heads-up as to where the next bit is coming from; prepares the audience a bit.

    7. on so that you too, can make choices that will ease your conscience and allow you to live a healthier, happier life

      [see also thoughts in previous annotation on "both"]

      I like the first part -- "I welcome you to join me in this exploration."

      Reading the latter, it seems to me somewhat prescriptive (what I should do), which I think is less effective (doesn't meet my need for autonomy / self-determination).

      One possibility, which (for me) would read very well and nicely, is to eliminate the rest of the sentence altogether (principle of "less is more").

      Another possibility: I'm wondering how this can be rephrased or reframed, such that it is truly an unattached invitation, rather than (how it seems to me) a moral recommendation.

    8. both

      Consider removing the underline on "both." I think this may read better (and possibly be more influential) without it -- my sense is that with the underline, I receive it as more prescriptive (what one should do), whereas without, I imagine it would feel less prescriptive & more descriptive (making an observation, not recommending action). .... Side note: Dale Carnegie's research seems to indicate, "Let people think it's their idea" (when choosing an action or decision) is a more effective approach in 'conversion.'

    9. then it occured to me

      My thoughts: This seems a little out-of-the-blue. Two points: One, the transition for me as a reader was (slightly) abrupt; and two, my inner skeptic says, "Really? You just suddenly woke up one day and realized this?" It begs the question of "How did this occur to you?", and leaves a little to be desired (for me at least). Some context, e.g. hearing friends/community talk about this, learning more, etc., may be of use for the reader here. I'm wondering whether telling a (brief) story or anecdote (maybe 1 to 3 paragraphs?) about how this occurred to you in the first place (or whether you'd thought about it for a while, etc.), may be worthwhile.

  12. Jan 2016
    1. The Center for Plain Language is a non-profit organization that promotes clear communication in government and business.

      "A communication is in plain language if its wording, structure, and design are so clear that the intended readers can readily find what they need, understand it, and use it."

      Plain language checklist<br> https://twitter.com/plain_language

    1. Megan Cossey<br> Tips for fact checking your writing:<br> * Verify every fact, no matter how insignificant.<br> * Find out which sources are regarded the most highly in the field you are writing about.<br> * If you can't verify it, delete it.

  13. Dec 2015
    1. I guess we’ll see if that’s something other people want too.” At press time, it was to early to tell

      1) TYPO: 'it was to early to tell.': change the first instance of 'to' -> 'too'

      It will then read: 'it was too early to tell.'


      2) Given the close proximity of two instances of 'too' (the first being the last word in the speaker's quotation, the second being our now-corrected typo)... consider replacing one of those instances with some other equivalent.

      The first instance would be easier, but less casual-sounding, to replace; options include:

      • 'also'
      • 'as well'

      The second instance would be a bit trickier; options include:

      • '{As of this writing | At press time}, that's still an open question.'
      • ', it was yet unclear.'
      • ', it was yet unclear what the outcome would be.'
      • ', it wasn't yet clear.'

      .... This said, my immediate thought is that 'it was too early to tell' is an open, receptive/neutral, and -- importantly -- potentially optimistic phrasing. I.e., "We don't know yet! The future could hold anything!"

      That's a much more optimistic outlook, compared to terms like 'unclear' -- that seems murky and potentially doubtful to my mind.

      So I like the way you phrased it initially.

    2. It is a question; a challenge.

      Strictly speaking, semi-colons are only used to separate clauses which could, on their own (as they stand), each be a grammatically complete sentence. The test? [You'll notice that last remark wasn't a grammatically complete sentence, by the way.]

      Replace the semi-colon with a period; see if it works.

      Replace the semi-colon with a period. See if it works.

      "A challenge" isn't a grammatically complete sentence. Of course, stylistic licenses are sometimes taken to defy the rule of "every clause between two periods must be a complete sentence."

      In this case, though, I'd suggest:

      • adding a repetition of "it is" after the semi-colon (to make it complete-sentence-worthy): 'It is a question; it is a challenge.', OR
      • replacing the semi-colon and substituting a colon in its place. (This also has the advantage, in my mind, of making it a 'stronger' statement: throwing down a challenge.): 'It is a question: a challenge.', OR
      • both: 'It is a question: it is a challenge.'

      Either or both should work. (Personally, I like the second option best: 'It is a question: a challenge.' ) That said, if you prefer it the way it is for style, go for it. It just stuck out in my mind, but I am a fiend for proper (or obsessive) semi-colon usage.

    3. NEWS PAGE 2

      OK, all the other boxes at the bottom work great, e.g. 'CULTURE PAGE 2'.

      Here, however... my brain immediately read this as "NEWS-PAGE" rather than "News. Comma (or colon). Page 2." I think this is because words like "newspaper" are common in our vocabulary. (Is "newspage" a common term?)

      Options:

      • insert a comma after 'NEWS' and/or
      • change 'PAGE' to lower-case (but then be sure to do this for all boxes).

      Personally, I like the first option at a minimum, and maybe or maybe not combined with the second option.

    4. Each volunteer seemed to have a different personal reason for participating. What they all seemed to share, however, was the firm belief that we can make the world drastically better for everyone.

      Consider replacing this with: 'Each volunteer seems to have had a different'

      I'm concerned about shift in (temporal) tense here.

      To me, the use of that tense seems to flow better with the temporal-tense of starting-in-recent-past and continuing-into-the-present. (I.e., that this movement is still occurring: in particular, that folks' reasons-cited are still active and are shaping their work and actions, rather than simply being in the past.... But it's your call, and a stylistic concern slightly more than a strictly grammatical one...)

    5. RSVP @ TomoRRowToday.newS/RSVP

      My concern is primarily a reader or "user-interface" note: Folks may be confused by the use of the '@' symbol. (I've seen people attempt to put them into website URLs where they shouldn't be.)

      In addition, since top-level domains (e.g. '.news') are relatively new -- AND given the odd type-face / all-caps font, plus or minus other factors -- I'm concerned about the greenest 'joe schmoe' user reading this, and not realizing either that it's a website address, or at least where it starts and ends.


      I may be over-simplifying it for the major of users; that said, you may wish to consider either or both of:

      • removing the '@' symbol
      • adding a colon

      So it could look like any of:

      • 'RSVP at:'
      • 'RSVP by going to:' (again with a colon)
      • 'Commit here:'

      In the URL, also consider:

      • prefixing http://

      AND/OR:

      • lower-casing at least the first T (in Tomorrow), OR changing the entire URL to a different font-type (although I'm unsure which to recommend, here)
    6. WE CAN DO BETTER!Action is the antidote to despair.> NEWS PAGE 2

      OK, all the other boxes at the bottom work great, e.g. 'CULTURE PAGE 2'.

      Here, however... my brain immediately read this as "NEWS-PAGE" rather than "News. Comma (or colon). Page 2." I think this is because words like "newspaper" are common in our vocabulary. (Is "newspage" a common term?)

      Options:

      • insert a comma after 'NEWS' and/or
      • change 'PAGE' to lower-case (but then be sure to do this for all boxes).

      Personally, I like the first option at a minimum, and optionally combined with the second option.

    7. to wel-come new volunteers, and to generate independent media to document and share everything online as rapidly and widely as possible.

      consider revising:

      • one possibility: 'to generate independent media, documenting and sharing everything online as rapidly and widely as possible.' (There are other ways of doing so -- I'm not sure what the best approach is, here....)
    8. “It’s a creative challenge,” said another volunteer. “There is no right answer. Anyone can participate just by doing or cre-ating something, and then shar-ing what they learn. The right answer for one community might not be the right answer for another community. The point is accepting the challenge. It’s about tackling an impossi-ble goal and pushing ourselves to get better at it.

      Given the slight shift here:

      "The point is accepting the challenge. It’s about tackling an impossi-ble goal and pushing ourselves to get better at it."

      .... I'd love to see the period replaced with a colon, because the flow of observations/evidence-statements being made has now shifted to a conclusion being stated.

      Purely a judgment call; my personal opinion is that it would read better this way: "There is no right answer. Anyone can participate just by doing or cre-ating something, and then shar-ing what they learn. The right answer for one community might not be the right answer for another community. The point is accepting the challenge: It’s about tackling an impossi-ble goal and pushing ourselves to get better at it."

  14. Aug 2015
  15. Jan 2015
  16. Jan 2014
    1. For a rapidly changing page, such as a heavily edited wiki, reframeit could prove somewhat redundant as content is removed or heavily edited, but for core content the power of this tool is evident.

      Need for editing tool integration or issue tracking workflow tags

  17. Aug 2013