131 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. the fresco, byTomasso da Modena, was painted in 1352). It stresses theDominicans’ commitment to Bible study and to scholarship, and noportrait conveys this more than the image of Hugh of St Cher.

      Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:38_Ugo_da_San_Caro.jpg

      Ugo da San Caro, serie dei Quaranta domenicani illustri, ex convento di San Niccolò, Sala del Capitolo, Treviso, 1352 (altezza di ciascun ritratto 150 cm circa) Image by Risorto Celebrano, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

      Thought to be one of the first images of a person wearing glasses. Image dated 1352.

  2. Feb 2024
    1. Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln (face rubbed), in mitre and red cope, with crosier, seated on left speaks to a seated group of five people, mostly women. Tree on right; large bird with long beak at top.

      image of MS 522 f1r Lambeth Palace Library

      Folio 1 of MS 522 of Château d'amour

      Close up of inset image via link close up of image on folio 1r of Château d'amour

      Book and images mentioned in Chapter 2 of @Duncan2022 Index, A History of the

    1. A section of a wall of slips in the Grimmwelt Museum showinghow the Brothers Grimm pioneered the methods used by theOED twenty years later.
    2. A 4 x 6-inch ‘slip’ sent in by one of the most prolific femalecontributors, Edith Thompson of Bath, who sent in 13,259slips. The underlinings and markings were made by Dr Murray.
  3. Jan 2024
  4. Sep 2023
    1. Watch: Moment Ukrainian missile hits Russia's Black Sea fleet HQ

      images on bbc.com have meaningful alt text descriptions that convey the content or function of the images. This means content should be available in different formats to accommodate various disabilities.

    2. 观看:乌克兰导弹击中俄罗斯黑海舰队总部的瞬间

      images on bbc.com have meaningful alt text descriptions that convey the content or function of the images. This means content should be available in different formats to accommodate various disabilities.

  5. Aug 2023
    1. After running the tests, I ended up with six profiles (three cached, three uncached). I’ve made those public, and you can find links to them below. First up, here’s a TL;DR of the key findings:Across all tests, loading the WebP page had the lowest energy consumption.Across all tests, loading the AVIF page had the highest energy consumption.JPEG was close to WebP in most tests.The uncached tests are fairly consistent. Testing when images are cached, however, has some wild variability. More testing is probably needed there.

      Fershad Irani looked at power consumption of images in websites. WebP came out on top (to his surprise) and JPG close. By the looks of it this is power consumption on the browser side. I suppose on the server side, power correlates with file size. The files used has JPG at 3.5 times WebP and 6 times Avif. Is webp / avif optimised for file compression (faster transmission) and less for rendering time? Does that explain the diff between Avif and Webp? All in all no biggie to stick with jpg it seems, except for choosing lowest suitable filesizes (percentwise webp would then achieve less optimisation on the transmission side)

      via Heinz .h feed.

  6. Jun 2023
    1. For the last decade or so, companies have been looking overseas, to India orChina, for cheap labor. But now it doesn’t matter where the laborers are – they might be down the block,they might be in Indonesia – as long as they are connected to the network

      I didn't realize how hard it was to retain information in the earlier times before the internet became a thing. This made me appreciate how much easier our generation has to gather information. I attached a picture of how the stock photo industry is growing and people are no longer traveling all over trying to get in contact with people from different places for information. In 2020 the stock photography market value was at 3.3 billion dollars.

  7. May 2023
    1. Requesting advice for where to put a related idea to a note I'm currently writing .t3_13gcbj1._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; } Hi! I am new to building a physical ZK. Would appreciate some help.Pictures here: https://imgur.com/a/WvyNVXfI have a section in my ZK about the concept of "knowledge transmission" (4170/7). The below notes are within that section.I am currently writing a note about how you have to earn your understanding... when receiving knowledge / learning from others. (Picture #1)Whilst writing this note, I had an idea that I'm not quite sure belongs on that note itself - and I'm not sure where it belongs. About how you also have to "earn" the sharing of knowledge. (Picture #2)Here are what I think my options are for writing about the idea "you have to earn your sharing of knowledge":Write this idea on my current card. 4170/7/1Write this idea on a new note - as a variant idea of my current note. 4170/7/1aWrite this idea on a new note - as a continuation of my current note. 4170/7/1/1Write this idea on a new note - as a new idea within my "knowledge transmission" branch. 4170/7/2What would you do here?

      reply to u/throwthis_throwthat at https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/13gcbj1/requesting_advice_for_where_to_put_a_related_idea/

      I don't accept the premise of your question. This doesn't get said often enough to people new to zettelkasten practice: Trust your gut! What does it say? You'll learn through practice that there are no "right" answers to these. Put a number on it, file it, and move on. Practice, practice, practice. You'll be doing this in your sleep soon enough. As long as it's close enough, you'll find it. Save your mental cycles for deeper thoughts than this.

      Asking others for their advice is fine, but it's akin to asking a well-practiced mnemonist what visual image they would use to remember something. Everyone is different and has different experiences and different things that make their memories sticky for them. What works incredibly well for how someone else thinks and the level of importance they give an idea is never as useful or as "true" as how you think about it. Going with your gut is going to help you remember it better and is far likelier to make it easier to find in the future.

  8. Apr 2023
  9. Feb 2023
    1. the birth of Athena from his head and suggests possibleinterpretations of these episodes

      I'll bet there's no mention that this is useful because it's an incredibly memorable image!

  10. Dec 2022
  11. Nov 2022
    1. There are two situations where an init-like process would be helpful for the container.
    2. highly recommended that the resulting image be just one concern per container; predominantly this means just one process per container, so there is no need for a full init system

      container images: whether to use full init process: implied here: don't need to if only using for single process (which doesn't fork, etc.)

    3. Because the official images are intended to be learning tools for those new to Docker as well as the base images for advanced users to build their production releases, we review each proposed Dockerfile to ensure that it meets a minimum standard for quality and maintainability. While some of that standard is hard to define (due to subjectivity), as much as possible is defined here, while also adhering to the "Best Practices" where appropriate.
  12. Oct 2022
    1. This search for order pushes one to seek out under-lying patterns and trends, to find relations that may betypical and causal.

      Finding order and relations (and their particular types), is a form of linking ideas found in some of the more complex zettelkasten and knowledge management spaces. It's not as explicit here and he doesn't seem to be focusing on stating or writing explicit links within his notes. He does, however, place some focus on the quality and types of links he's making (or at least thinking about), something which isn't frequently seen in the current PKM space. For example, no one is creating user interfaces that show links between ideas which are opposite (or in opposition or antonym relation) to each other.

  13. Sep 2022
  14. Aug 2022
  15. Jun 2022
    1. *The compass*

      I too have seen this before, though the directions may have been different.

      When thinking about an idea, map it discretely. North on the compass rose is where the idea comes from, South is where it leads to, West leads to things similar to the idea while East are ideas that are the opposite of it.

      This is useful in situating information, particularly with respect to the similarities and opposites. One must generally train themselves to think about the opposites.

      Many of the directions are directly related to putting information into a zettelkasten, in particular where X comes from (source), where it leads (commentary or links to other ides), what's similar to x are links to either closely related ideas or to an index. The opposite of X is the one which is left out in this system too.

      *The compass*: <br>Saw that one before. Ugh, didn't like it.<br><br>Thinking about it though, it's a fitting metaphor to look at a note from different directions. I'm going to add this to my notes template(Just to try). All my notes have North & could use some other perspectives 🎉<br><br>🧶4/4 pic.twitter.com/CJctmC5Y39

      — Alex Qwxlea (@QwxleaA) June 14, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Link to - Indigenous map conceptualizations - direction finding - method of loci

  16. May 2022
    1. I returned to another OER Learning Circle and wrote an ebook version of a Modern World History textbook. As I wrote this, I tested it out on my students. I taught them to use the annotation app, Hypothesis, and assigned them to highlight and comment on the chapters each week in preparation for class discussions. This had the dual benefits of engaging them with the content, and also indicating to me which parts of the text were working well and which needed improvement. Since I wasn't telling them what they had to highlight and respond to, I was able to see what elements caught students attention and interest. And possibly more important, I was able to "mind the gaps', and rework parts that were too confusing or too boring to get the attention I thought they deserved.

      This is an intriguing off-label use case for Hypothes.is which is within the realm of peer-review use cases.

      Dan is essentially using the idea of annotation as engagement within a textbook as a means of proactively improving it. He's mentioned it before in Hypothes.is Social (and Private) Annotation.

      Because one can actively see the gaps without readers necessarily being aware of their "review", this may be a far better method than asking for active reviews of materials.

      Reviewers are probably not as likely to actively mark sections they don't find engaging. Has anyone done research on this space for better improving texts? Certainly annotation provides a means for helping to do this.

  17. Apr 2022
    1. What Iam alluding to here is well drawn out in Walter Benjamin’s reflectionin his Moscow Diary on how we ‘grasp’ a visual image. ‘One does notin any way enter into its space’, he writes. Rather, ‘It opens up to usin corners and angles in which we believe we can localise crucialexperiences of the past; there is something inexplicably familiarabout these spots’ (Benjamin, 1985: 42).
  18. Mar 2022
    1. The Inca are most often remembered not for what they had but for what they didn’t have: the wheel, iron, a written language.

      A solid example of how western cultures dismiss non-literate cultures.

  19. Feb 2022
  20. Jan 2022
  21. Dec 2021
  22. Oct 2021
  23. Sep 2021
  24. Aug 2021
    1. "intrinsicSize" attribute tells the browser to ignore the actual intrinsic size of the image and pretend it's the size specified in the attribute
    1. Many of the snippets here talk about what was in individual commonplace books and how their contents indicated what was admired. What about the negative image of all the things which were excluded?

      What things did people read which they didn't commonplace? What does that say about them? Their times? The way they thought?

      Could their commonplacing be compared with their marginalia to show what rose to certain levels of interest and what didn't? Digging through the records to find and verify marginalia may be incredibly tedious in comparison with specifically kept things.

      Some of my own fleeting notes, which I keep because it's easy, may show some interesting things about the way I think in comparison to those things upon which I expand, keep, and value more for my work and my worldview.

  25. Jul 2021
  26. May 2021
    1. That image only contains 200 pixels horizontally, but the browser stretches it to 400px wide or even farther!Luckily, you’ll see there’s an easy “fix” there at the end: our old good friend the width attribute!<img src="example.gif", srcset="example.gif 200w" sizes="(min-width: 400px) 400px, 100vw" width="200" /* <=== TA-DA! */ class="logo">As long as you can specify the width attribute so it reflects the true maximum size of your largest image, you won’t run into this problem of having sizes make your image wider than it naturally should go.
    2. The selected source size affects the intrinsic size of the image (the image’s display size if no CSS styling is applied).
    3. Of course in the world of responsive images, we put constraints on our images with CSS:img { max-width: 100%;}Now the image appears at it’s natural size unless it’s constrained by the parent container! Excellent.
    1. A common practice in email marketing is to use images for everything in the email: graphics, illustrations, copy, links, and buttons. Although this can be efficient (slice, dice, and send it on its way), it’s another huge problem for subscribers relying on screen readers. The typical image-based email has a lot of information that can’t be parsed by a machine. What’s more is that a lot of email clients disable images by default, too.
    1. And what’s more, a growing number of email readers are even voluntarily turning off images in their emails to reduce load time and improve email speed. Google recently revealed that 43% of Gmail users actually don’t read emails with background images on.
  27. Apr 2021
    1. It should be defined inline. If you are using the img tag, that image should have semantic value to the content, which is why the alt attribute is required for validation. If the image is to be part of the layout or template, you should use a tag other than the img tag and assign the image as a CSS background to the element. In this case, the image has no semantic meaning and therefore doesn't require the alt attribute. I'm fairly certain that most screen readers would not even know that a CSS image exists.

      I believed this when I first read it, but changed my mind when I read this good rebuttal: https://hyp.is/f1ndKJ5eEeu_IBtubiLybA/stackoverflow.com/questions/640190/image-width-height-as-an-attribute-or-in-css

    2. Ah yes, excactly the right answer. Img tags are for information, css backgrounds are for layout.
  28. Mar 2021
    1. He introduces the idea of the apophatic: what we can't put into words, but is important and vaguely understood. This term comes from Orthodox theology, where people defined god by saying what it was not.

      Too often as humans we're focused on what is immediately in front of us and not what is missing.

      This same thing plagues our science in that we're only publishing positive results and not negative results.

      From an information theoretic perspective, we're throwing away half (or more?) of the information we're generating. We might be able to go much farther much faster if we were keeping and publishing all of our results in better fashion.

      Is there a better word for this negative information? #openquestions

  29. Feb 2021
  30. parsejournal.com parsejournal.com
    1. Their modes of operating present an image of how thinking takes shape in and through material and embodied practice
    2. short prose texts that aim to evoke mental images as a result of how they engage their readers.
  31. Jan 2021
    1. Snaps each pick a ‘base’, for example, Ubuntu18 (corresponding to the set of minimal debs in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS). Nevertheless, the choice of base does not impact on your ability to use a snap on any of the supported Linux distributions or versions — it’s a choice of the publisher and should be invisible to you as a user or developer.

      Snaps sound a lot like container images in this respect.

  32. Oct 2020
  33. Jul 2020
    1. One way around this is simply linking to each SVG with an <img> tag, instead of embedding the actual SVG in the DOM. This way, the virtual DOM only needs to track one node per image, instead of hundreds for each SVG. Inline SVG [above] vs linked SVG. But in doing so we’ve crippled our ability to manipulate our SVGs. No longer can we add stroke, move shapes, remove nodes or change fill. In short, if you want :hover to change the fill color, you’re back in the stone age.
    1. You know the trade-off. Use the img tag to display an SVG, and you get clean markup — at the cost of styling the SVG using its properties like fill, stroke, SVG filters and more.
  34. Jun 2020
    1. Image license: CC0 1.0 Universal; Patrick Hochstenbach

      Add alt text. Use TASL (Title Author Source License) citation format.

    2. Melanie Imming, & Jon Tennant. (2018, June 8). Sticker Open Science: just science done right. Zenodo. https://zenodo.org/record/1285575#.XDebSM17lPY

      Add alt-text to images to make them accessible to people using screen readers.

  35. May 2020
    1. The main caveat to note is that it does use musl libc instead of glibc and friends, so certain software might run into issues depending on the depth of their libc requirements. However, most software doesn't have an issue with this, so this variant is usually a very safe choice.
    2. See this Hacker News comment thread for more discussion of the issues that might arise and some pro/con comparisons of using Alpine-based images.
    1. Image consumers can enable DCT to ensure that images they use were signed. If a consumer enables DCT, they can only pull, run, or build with trusted images. Enabling DCT is a bit like applying a “filter” to your registry. Consumers “see” only signed image tags and the less desirable, unsigned image tags are “invisible” to them.
    1. In the examples below, we are using Docker images tags to specify a specific version, such as docker:19.03.8. If tags like docker:stable are used, you have no control over what version is going to be used and this can lead to unpredictable behavior, especially when new versions are released.
    1. It is a multi-stage image which reproduces the following operations:Construction of the artefacts in a build imageAvailability of the compilation process in a minimal image
  36. Sep 2019
  37. Aug 2019
  38. May 2019
    1. Florentine

      Florentine represents the political scene of Italy at the time and the physiology that ended up getting Dante exiled. Dante considered the Florentine politics to be mischievous, which is why he put a character that represented this in The Inferno. After being exiled, along with many others, Dante considered the results of the politics to be a sin.

    2. INFERNO VIII↩⚓✪ The Fifth Circle. Intemperance in Indignation⚓✪ The Wrathful and Sullen. Styx. The City of Dis

      The City of Dis refers to the walls that encompasses all of lower hell where the serious sins are punished. Dis, also known as Pluto, is one of the kings of the underworld. Dis represents Lucifer and the lower circles of his infernal realm. It is in The Inferno because it is where the worst sinners reside and is imperative to Dante’s portrayal of his own version of hell.

  39. Jan 2019
  40. Oct 2018
    1. discover other ways of knowing

      or to express other ways to communicate information as through images

  41. Sep 2018
    1. Down the ravine

      Wright never allows us to forget how the imagery is coming to him and no one else. He is the intermediary. He sees. He hears. He observes.

  42. Mar 2018
    1. Pros:

      1.The map and text work together well, The map provides a graphic which gives support the information in the text. The text gives additional information which provides additional context for the map graphic. 2.The graphics and map are properly labeled and are free of misspellings and grammatical errors. The Legend contains are required information for the map to be accurately read.

      Cons:

      1. Personally, I do not like the added graphics of the otter fetuses and otter ovaries added to this map. In my opinion the images of the harvested fetuses give a weight to those graphics which should be playing a secondary role to the role of average otter ages. The author should be aware that images like these might distract the attention of a reader from the rest of the content.
      2. The location of some of the names of the river basins could be moved for easier identification. Some of the labels on the map are well done, but three or four of them aren't as easy to spot or harder to read and could benefit from being moved to a different location.
  43. Dec 2017
    1. Scientists across the world were asked to submit their images to the 2017 Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition and they sent in more than 1100 images – our highest amount so far.

      These are so cool!

  44. Nov 2017
    1. Yes we do have a Wordpress plugin, available here: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/cloudinary-image-management-and-manipulation-in-the-cloud-cdn/. While you don't need to install any image software on your server, you will need to register for a (free) Cloudinary account to use the plugin and start uploading images to the cloud.

      If you have existing images, presumably you need to re-upload these, I think

  45. Dec 2016
  46. Oct 2016
    1. A heap of broken images

      I think this line refers to the poem itself. The poem is full of images as it moves, and often they feel disparate and negative, like "dead land" next to "breeding lilacs" in the opening two lines. The poem is a pile of fragments brought together. The fragments interact within the pile or the poem to create meaning.

  47. Jul 2016
    1. "In December, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website. It demanded payment of $120. This was how Highsmith came to learn that stock photo agencies Getty and Alamy had been sending similar threat letters and charging fees to users of her images, which she had donated to the Library of Congress for use by the general public at no charge."

  48. Apr 2016