22 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Aug 2019
  3. May 2019
    1. Florentine

      Florentine represents the political scene of Italy at the time and the physiology that ended up getting Dante exiled. Dante considered the Florentine politics to be mischievous, which is why he put a character that represented this in The Inferno. After being exiled, along with many others, Dante considered the results of the politics to be a sin.

    2. INFERNO VIII↩⚓✪ The Fifth Circle. Intemperance in Indignation⚓✪ The Wrathful and Sullen. Styx. The City of Dis

      The City of Dis refers to the walls that encompasses all of lower hell where the serious sins are punished. Dis, also known as Pluto, is one of the kings of the underworld. Dis represents Lucifer and the lower circles of his infernal realm. It is in The Inferno because it is where the worst sinners reside and is imperative to Dante’s portrayal of his own version of hell.

  4. Jan 2019
  5. Oct 2018
    1. discover other ways of knowing

      or to express other ways to communicate information as through images

  6. Sep 2018
    1. Down the ravine

      Wright never allows us to forget how the imagery is coming to him and no one else. He is the intermediary. He sees. He hears. He observes.

  7. Mar 2018
    1. Pros:

      1.The map and text work together well, The map provides a graphic which gives support the information in the text. The text gives additional information which provides additional context for the map graphic. 2.The graphics and map are properly labeled and are free of misspellings and grammatical errors. The Legend contains are required information for the map to be accurately read.

      Cons:

      1. Personally, I do not like the added graphics of the otter fetuses and otter ovaries added to this map. In my opinion the images of the harvested fetuses give a weight to those graphics which should be playing a secondary role to the role of average otter ages. The author should be aware that images like these might distract the attention of a reader from the rest of the content.
      2. The location of some of the names of the river basins could be moved for easier identification. Some of the labels on the map are well done, but three or four of them aren't as easy to spot or harder to read and could benefit from being moved to a different location.
  8. Dec 2017
    1. Scientists across the world were asked to submit their images to the 2017 Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition and they sent in more than 1100 images – our highest amount so far.

      These are so cool!

  9. Nov 2017
    1. Yes we do have a Wordpress plugin, available here: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/cloudinary-image-management-and-manipulation-in-the-cloud-cdn/. While you don't need to install any image software on your server, you will need to register for a (free) Cloudinary account to use the plugin and start uploading images to the cloud.

      If you have existing images, presumably you need to re-upload these, I think

  10. Dec 2016
  11. Oct 2016
    1. A heap of broken images

      I think this line refers to the poem itself. The poem is full of images as it moves, and often they feel disparate and negative, like "dead land" next to "breeding lilacs" in the opening two lines. The poem is a pile of fragments brought together. The fragments interact within the pile or the poem to create meaning.

  12. Jul 2016
    1. "In December, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website. It demanded payment of $120. This was how Highsmith came to learn that stock photo agencies Getty and Alamy had been sending similar threat letters and charging fees to users of her images, which she had donated to the Library of Congress for use by the general public at no charge."

  13. Apr 2016
  14. Jan 2016
    1. 180,000 public domain items from the New York Public Library Digital Collections. Photographs, stereoscopic photos, illustrations, maps, ancient texts, manuscripts, historical correspondence, sheet music, and more!

      http://api.repo.nypl.org/<br> https://github.com/NYPL-publicdomain/data-and-utilities<br> API and metadata

      http://nypl.org/publicdomain<br> More info, and some projects that use the API.

  15. Oct 2015
    1. why not annotate, say, the Eiffel Tower itself

      As long as it has some URI, it can be annotated. Any object in the world can be described through the Semantic Web. Especially with Linked Open Data.

  16. Sep 2015
    1. cool-looking map

      Maps make a great case for SVG. There are some neat libraries and tools to play with SVG maps but, more importantly, maps make it easy to understand that an image can be semantic.

      A couple of weeks before Shepazu posted this, was playing with SVG maps of contemporary Africa’s political boundaries. (Especially those used on Wikipedia; including some which separate South Sudan.) Been teaching African Studies (on occasion) for years, and maps of the continent tend to become important quite quickly.

      Those SVG maps with which I started playing were pretty neat in several respects. The fact that they were vector drawings instead of bitmaps meant that they easily be resized without causing visual artifacts. More importantly, though, each country was drawn as a named outline, so it was possible to play with them as separate objects.

      One thing I was trying to do is create an animation which would show where each country fits in a region of the continent, using this United Nations geoscheme. Doing so, eventually noticed that Sudan and South Sudan had been classified as part of different regions, which is an interesting tidbit which could lead to useful classroom discussions.

      Haven’t retraced all the steps but, at some point, I’ve used a Public Domain map of Africa from Wikimedia Commons (itself based on another Public Domain map), and ended up creating a simple animated version using Tumult’s Hype commercial HTML5 editor.

      It’s flawed in many ways, but for someone with almost no background in this things, it’s a significant accomplishment.

      (Surely, the same could be done through SVG itself. Haven’t been able to learn how to do so.)

      Playing with those maps taught me quite a few things. For instance, the benefits of a well-tagged image. And some rudimentary notions of CSS-based animations. Or the limitations linked to selecting rectangular sections of an image (with a large overlap between Northern and Western Africa, for instance).

      Static Map of African Regions The experience also gave me all sorts of ideas. Such as annotating parts of a well-structured image. Or uses for Open Street Maps. Or ways to embed interactive content (including quizzes) in Open Textbooks.

      The key point, perhaps, and what led me to Schepers’s work (including this deeply insightful SVG-based presentation and interactive infographic about annotations) is that Open Standards can open up fascinating opportunities for learning.

      W3C Annotation Architecture proposal So nice to be working at a standards-happy learning technology non-profit!

  17. May 2015
    1. Petr Pridal, from KlokanTechnologies, Switzerland, gave some insights into Georeferencer, another multi-platform, web based, collections viewer, but specifically designed for the presentation of maps. What makes Georeferencer different is the facility to create anchor points on each map that the user is viewing. This enables each map to move and zoom with the others simultaneously

      Could be interesting for displaying/interacting with GIS/geodata without leaving the browser.

  18. Mar 2015
  19. Jan 2014