26 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. mes noted oftener than absolutely necessary, and some transitions arc of necessity omitted. It i

      more embodied rhetoric

    2. very vuricty of o

      Interesting here the interconnectedness of language and the body -- an embodied rhetoric. Physical gestures find root in classical rhetoric, but this seems to be the most explicit example of it in the readings we've encountered so far in this class.

      As kmurphy1 has noted, there's also a move to contextualize rhetoric and language against growing interests in the (literal) mechanics of the body. Astell makes a similar pivot with her use of the word "Particles" to describe aspects of language and her machine-body metaphor.

    1. voice and gesture

      Ok, I don't know that Locke would disagree, but Sheridan is specifically including the vocal chords and limbs, that is, the body, in the sphere of the rhetorical.

    1. .

      I actually wasn't aware of the psychological associations with "histrionics." Being a nerd who watches commentaries for animated films, histrionics is often a term used to describe an animator's bad habit of constantly making the model move. You'll see this a lot in traditionally animated films, where motions are exaggerated -- it's typically done because our eye reads a non-moving animated character as flat and lifeless. I know gestures were a key part of classical rhetoric, so is this what Hume is advocating for here, an increased focus on the rhetoric of physicality?

  2. Jan 2019
    1. This understanding of matter animates the compos-ition of posthuman subjects of knowledge – embedded, embodied andyet flowing in a web of relations with human and non-human others.

      embedded, embodied, yet flowing

      the phrasing feels like a return to the feminist lens, somehow, though I'm not sure I can articulate quite how.

    1. embodied information,”

      As information has become more ubiquitous and trivial, an important sense of the word has faded. "Information" is something "put in a form" or something "that forms."

      It's fascinating to think about how information forms us, and how outsourcing that also changes us.

      Note also that Brooke calls for "a return." This is a great fact to keep in my back pocket for the common misconception of posthumanism as "after human crazy cyborg thingy." No, Brooke, a posthumanist, says "go back."

  3. Dec 2018
    1. Embodied Interaction is interaction with computer systems that occupy our world, a world of physical and social reality, and that exploit this fact in how they interact with us

      Definition of embodied interaction

  4. Aug 2018
    1. Plotline 3: Making life sensible is as much about who we are as about narrating events and experiences

      Later in this section, Cunliffe and Coupland write:

      "In summary, ‘making life sensible’ is a complex interweaving of self-other, of retrospective and prospective, discursive and embodied, routine and creative, explicit and intuitive sensemaking."

      The narrating process is a "a complex interweaving of self-other, of retrospective and prospective, discursive and embodied, routine and creative, explicit and intuitive sensemaking."

      Identity construction (who am I?, who are you?, who do I want to be in the future?) is an important factor here as the foundation by which socially constructed sensemaking is generated and justifications (narrative rationality) are staked out.

      It's also incredibly messy, social, and contradictory -- all simultaneously.

    2. Plotline 2: Making our life sensible enough to go on is an embodied process

      The embodied process involves how we our bodies (everything except cognitive function) to make sense of our surroundings/situations. This embodied process includes emotions, physical self, language, gestures, actions, and lived experiences.

    3. Our theorization of embodied sensemaking differs from, and extends, current work in three main ways. First, we define embodiment more broadly than emotion – as bodily sensations, felt experiences, emotions and sen-sory knowing; second, we situate embodiment in lived experience not as abstracted from, and able to be generalized across, experience; and third, we argue that embodiment is an integral part of sensemaking.

      Description of embodied narrative sensemaking. Cunliffe and Coupland refer to these as plotlines:

      "Plotline 1: Making life sensible occurs in polyphonic, responsive and ongoing moments of embodied narrative performance"

      "Plotline 2: Making our life sensible enough to go on is an embodied process"

      "Plotline 3: Making life sensible is as much about who we are as about narrating events and experiences"

    4. Ricoeur (e.g. 1988) because he sees narrative theory as a form of making sense in and across time that involves personal and community identit

      Ricoeur claims there are temporal elements to sensemaking

      Get this paper

    5. Merleau-Ponty (2004 [1962], 2004 [1948]) because of his theorization of the relationship between perception and embodi-ment.

      Unsure about whether Merleau-Ponty's work also includes a temporal element. Get the paper.

    6. Specifically, we argue that making life sensible:• occurs in embedded narrative performances – in the lived experience of everyday, ordinary interactions and conversations with others and ourselves;• is temporal, taking place moment-to-moment within and across time and space;• encompasses polyphony as we attempt to interweave multiple, alternative and contested narratives and stories;• is an ongoing embodied process of interpretation of self and experience in which we cannot separate ourselves, our senses, our body and emotions

      Four features of everyday sensemaking:

      • lived experience

      • temporal

      • polyphonic

      • embodied

    7. Our contribution lies in extending the work on sensemaking theory to include the notion of embodied narrative sensemaking, which posits that whether we are aware of it or not, we make our lives and ourselves ‘sensible’ through embodied (bodily) interpreta-tions in our ongoing everyday interactions.

      Extension of sensemaking theory

  5. Jul 2018
    1. Unlike the movement of the body, in scholarship we can—and often do—look at one piece of a system of communication without seeing its relationship to others.

      But is that a good thing, to decontextualize?

    2. as a force which connects us to the universe, and as a force which allows our body to make meaning from this connection. What we can understand from such a connection includes the distinction between our self and other selves, or our self and the rest of the world, but also, importantly, our relationship to the world, to other bodies in the world

      embodiment as Identity formation:

    3. Embodied rhetoric
  6. Sep 2017
    1. This is equivalent to what Montessori was saying: If you want to live in the 21st century, you’d better embody it. You can’t teach it in a classroom. And so, Papert was saying, “Hey, this is math. It’s not just learning math. It’s an environment. It has all these things.”
  7. May 2017
    1. Spiders appear to offload cognitive tasks to their webs, making them one of a number of species with a mind that isn’t fully confined within the head.
  8. Apr 2017
    1. I change myself, I change the world.

      With my earlier post about Anzaldua paralleling her body with her language, here, she uses that connection with other bodies connected by language and imagination.

    2. Ethnic identity is twin skin to linguistic identity-I am my language.

      Play that off with Douglass whose body was a text and his text was compromised from his body, here, Anzaldua parallels insulting her language with suffering physical harm.

    3. My mouth is a motherlode.

      I really like that this section, that is very much concerned with location and identity, starts with identifying the mouth and tongue as a location for rhetoric. It also identifies it with a metaphor of wealth, that there's an internal treasure that is being pulled from her.

  9. Mar 2017
    1. Write! and your self-seeking text will know it-self better than flesh and blood, rising, insurrec-tionary dough kneading itself, with sonorous, perfumed ingredients, a lively combination of flying colors, leaves, and rivers plunging into the sea we feed.

      Another line building on the use of texts to construct the self, and I'm interested in her move to go from "flesh and blood" to baking bread to this autumnal estuary. Less of a singular organism to a networked ecosystem, perhaps?

    2. In fact, she physically materializes what she's thinking; she signifies it with her body.

      We've talked a lot about embodied rhetoric for women, and the importance of acknowledging a rhetor's body, actions, and delivery as much as their words. But I'm also interested in this because Cixous' writing style is extremely animated: this almost sounds like a speech.

      Also, this reminds me of Kathryn's comment on Sarah Mallet using her seizures to legitimize her preaching.

  10. Feb 2017
    1. taking me as his text;

      Resonance with Rickert and Foucault, but I like the parallelism here: as an autobiography, Douglass constructs himself rhetorically, and within the text, Garrison rhetorically disseminates Douglass. There's an interconnectivity of body and speech here that's very interesting.

  11. Jul 2016
    1. The body matters to learning.

      PhysEd teachers have a lot to teach us. We may mention this, paying lipservice to the notion of embodied learning. But it’s remarkable how “heady” we all remain in pedagogical spheres.