993 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Weeks later, Trump signed the CLOUD Act into law, which gave US law enforcement more legal pathways to pursue data stories overseas. The provision was tucked into the $1.3 trillion spending bill Trump signed to avoid a federal government shutdown. With the new law on the books, federal prosecutors went back to court in and asked for another warrant to get the materials that Google refused to turn over. In an April 2018 affidavit, the FBI agent argued that "providers are required to disclose data even if it is stored abroad" under the new law. The judge approved the new search warrant later that day, giving investigators access to additional information from Google, including Cohen's emails, attachments, address book and files stored on Google Drive.

      Wow. What if it was a pole got that snuck in the bill for this very reason? Or was it just luck?

  2. Mar 2019
  3. Feb 2019
    1. “(There is) $65 million for studying salmon. Man, you can go to the Red Lobster and study it for $12.95,” he said. “That’s ridiculous … We didn’t do anything, just spent you all’s money. It’s a disgrace.”

      This makes Tim Burchett look as dumb as he actually is. This kind of logic is dumbfoundingly stupid, particularly from an elected official.

    1. Thethrillofthinking,thepleasureofthought

      then is it as marvellous a thing in him, . . .

      Intellectual exciting for Melville.

    2. Euclid

      The Free Masons seem attracted to him.

      Some Euclid Background

    3. hisgreatnovel
    4. Melville
    5. syllogisms

      More info

      The classic example:

      All whales are animals that breathe by means of lungs.<br> All whales are mammals.<br> All whales are animals that breath by means of lungs.<br>

      In the Prior Analytics, Aristotle presents the first system of logic, the theory of the syllogism (see the entry on Aristotle's logic and ch. 1 of Lagerlund 2000 for further details). A syllogism is a deduction consisting of three sentences: two premises and a conclusion. Syllogistic sentences are categorical sentences involving a subject and a predicate connected by a copula (verb). These are in turn divided into four different classes: universal affirmative (A), particular affirmative (I), universal negative (E) and particular negative (O), written by Aristotle as follows:

      A – A belongs to all B (AaB) I – A belongs to some B (AiB) E – A does not belong to any B (AeB) O – A does not belong to some B (AoB)

    6. bestiaries

      A Medieval term

      The bestiary, or "book of beasts", is more than just an expansion of the Physiologus, though the two have much in common. The bestiary also describes a beast and uses that description as a basis for an allegorical teaching, but by including text from other sources it goes further; and while still not a "zoology textbook", it is not only a religious text, but also a description of the world as it was known.

      The bestiary manuscripts were usually illustrated, sometimes lavishly, as for example in the Harley Bestiary and the Aberdeen Bestiary; the pictures served as a "visual language" for the illiterate public, who knew the stories - preachers used them in sermons - and would remember the moral teaching when they saw the beast depicted. Bestiary images could be found everywhere.

    1. You may seen on Inside

      This is getting worse than a high school essay.

    2. “Having played in that offense, they don’t have an answer for all-out pressure,” Hoyer says. “Their answer is for the quarterback to make a play.” BENOIT: Super Bowl LIII Tale of the Tape: Two Dominant Defenses, Gurley’s Disappearance and the Real MVP The flip side? In this cat-and-mouse game, the Patriots knew McVay’s offense had different ways it could crush all-out pressure, so Flores had to be judicious about calling it. New England showed pressure a ton, but didn’t send everyone much at all.

      What the hell? This totally contradicts itself, it seems. I've read it now three times, and I still can't figure out the hell it means.

    3. At Devin McCourty’s kitchen table on Friday, the the brothers brought up Hoyer’s value, Devin remembers a moment a moment during the team’s preparation for Kansas City in October when the first defense showed the scout team a blitz look that had all 11 defenders within 10 yards of the line of scrimmage.

      What the hell?

  4. Jan 2019
    1. ItallowsustothinkofHegelasatheoristwhomadepossibletheinsightsthat“alltruthsareatbestmomentary,situational,andmarkedbyahistoryintheprocessofchangeandtransformation,”that“conceptsarenotautonomousbutratherrelational,”andthatthe“philosophicalproblem”is,“namely,thatofrepresentation,anditsdilemmas,itsdialectic,itsfailures,anditsimpossibility.

      This is the key to it all.

    2. ThisAdornianideaofthreadingtheHegelianneedle

      Repeat with a difference

    3. desideratum
    4. extirpated
    5. indeliblylinguistic:dialectic.

      The dialectic is logos, linguistic.

    6. TheaimofthisbookistogetbehindthatmediatingscriminordertothinkaboutHegel’sworkdirectly,unencumberedbytheweightofHegelianismsandenergizedbyhisdaringappropriationofthedialecticofidentityanddifference.Itisalsotoindicatesomethingspecificbytheword“theory.

      Needs us to forget what we've falsely been taught about Hegel.

    7. Hegelresponsible

      What Hegel's critics say.

    8. Inthisbook,IdemonstratehowHegel’sdialecticemergedfromthephilosophicalpracticesofmedievalthinkers,mappingaspreciselyaspossiblethelineamentsofHegel’sdebtandtheimplicationsofacknowledgingthatdebt(chaps.1and2)

      Thesis.

    9. Hegelrecuperatesthedialecticofidentityanddifference

      Identity and Difference is what makes the Hegelian Dialectic.

    10. Fordialectic,likethewhale,regardstwodistinctpictures,twodifferentideas,andcombinesthemintoasinglethought.

      Definition of Hegelian Dialiectic

    11. Thethrillofthinking,thepleasureofthought,comesinthismomentof“combining...twodistinctprospects”acrossthegreatexpanse,overcomingnothingnessinturn.
    12. Fortoseetwothingsatonceispossibleonlyontwoconditions:

      The problem that the Hegelian dialectic solves.

    1. Collective bargaining in action. And, more importantly perhaps, this puts Unions as a power to the people backstop. The action of Federal Employees, unionized, who could just stop showing up without fear of being fired is what we should be selling.

    1. there's always a race to be the last one to talk to Haslam before a big decision

      Sounds like Trump!

    2. Haslam told the group he felt Jackson could relate better to players.

      He's trying?

    1. But of course I can never be sure if the guy actually believes what he's saying or is just fucking around.

      Exactly!

  5. Dec 2018
  6. Nov 2018
    1. And where we normally approach such environments as fi xed, I treat them here as plastic, made by particular human

      What does he mean here?

    Annotators

    1. "Ah seen de pitchers of Henry Ford and he's a spare-built man and Rockefeller look lak he ain't got but one gut.

      Heroic figures? Icons?

    Annotators

    1. The original Americans who came over from Europe and founded this country

      This makes no sense. How can one be original but not be original?

    1. carte blanche leash

      Please don't let this become a thing: carte blanche leash.

    2. The Uber took a ‘weird way,’ is code for a girl really ran 20 minutes late.

      And is a stupid person's way of making a bad excuse, since all ride services use Waze or GMaps.

    3. Founding Farmers
    4. “It just seems like she’s playing a character,” she says. “I just wonder, if those views had not started gaining her attention, would we be getting this version of Britt McHenry?”

      Bingo!

    5. “I always try to give people the benefit of the doubt, and I wish sometimes that was reciprocated for me, because I had to work really hard

      Classic white aggrievement. Nowhere does she feel bad for the other human. She's all, "me me me!"

    6. That’s why I have a degree and you don’t” and “Maybe if I was missing some teeth they would hire me, huh?
    7. Tennys Sandgren
    1. The researchers hypothesized that, because students can type faster

      Her evidence for why students learn less with laptops

    2. Laptops distract from learning, both for users and for those around them

      Supporting evidence for why she wants to ban laptops.

    3. They also tend to earn worse grades

      2nd reason she wants to ban laptops.

    4. college students learn less when they use computers or tablets during lectures.

      First reason she wants to ban laptops.

    1. of R

      asdfasdfasdf

    Annotators

    1. DAVIDFLEMINGRevitalizing the Public Spherein Metropolitan AmericaCityo

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    2. City of R

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    Annotators

    1. City of

      yrtesfdgsfdgsdfgsdfgsdfg

    2. ity

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    Annotators

    1. DAVIDFLEMINGRevitalizing the Public Spherein Metropolitan AmericaCity

      asdfasdfaksdfj;alks/dfj

    2. City of RhetoricFleming, David. City of Rhetoric : Revitalizing

      asdfasdfgasdf

    3. City of

      asdfasdfasdfasdfasdf

    4. of Rhet

      asdfasdf

    Annotators

    1. City

      Testing

    Annotators

    1. That’s a discourse whose rhetorical modality or temporality is the future anterior. It is the threat of the catastrophe that will have been ours if we do not do X, Y, and Z. So you have this phantasmatic production of the apocalypse.

      This is a way to consider this Referendum:

      Shall property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?

    2. itself as not political.

      Such a key concept, I think. In fact, I'd say this is the US Dividing line.

    3. culture industry

      Theodor Adorno, The Culture Industry

    4. Enola Gay controversy
    5. calculative and meditative

      Here's a random student's thought on this:

    6. that text again
    7. Martin Heidegger

      Martin Heidegger A very important philosopher. Most recently, his work has inspired a relatively new movement, Object-Oriented Ontology.

    8. IBM Selectric.
  7. Oct 2018
    1. y friend, classmate, and floormate, Eryka,

      ;weiarjq;lwkaejra;lsdkfj

    2. ertain aspects,

      This is my annotation.

    1. I opened it, and saw it was a savings' bank.

      Saving money.

    2. deshabille
    3. Ginger Nut
    4. Spitzenbergs
    5. potations
    6. obstreperousness
    7. execrable
    8. pantaloons
    9. a dun,
    10. blazonry
    11. anthracite.
    12. cannel coal
    13. deficient in what landscape painters call "life."

      So mediated

    14. But this is by the way.

      He doth protest too much!

    15. Master in Chancery
    16. not unemployed

      Why the double negative?

    17. John Jacob Astor

      The United States's first multimillionaire

    18. Imprimis
    1. Where you stand on this debate ultimately depends, like many fraught issues, not so much on facts but on ideas and ideology, and how you think about race, about fairness, about meritocracy.

      Pathos wins out.

  8. onlinelibrary-wiley-com.proxy.library.georgetown.edu onlinelibrary-wiley-com.proxy.library.georgetown.edu
    1. object world but not upon object relationships, for the nar-rator is both a social man and a solitary man –

      asdfasdf

    2. 3 A Guide to M elville ’ s “ B artleby, the S crivener ” Steven T. Ryan Let ’ s begin with possibly the best dash in American literature: I seldom lose my temper; much more seldom indulge in dangerous indignation at wrongs and outrages; but I m

      test

    1. Overwhelmed at the last, Job finally places his hand upon his mouth and succumbs to Authority, and is re:.

      Does he relent, though?

    Annotators

    1. [14] With kings and counsellers of the earth, which built desolate places for themselves;

      "Eh! -He's asleep, aint he?" "With kings and counselors," murmured I [the Lawyer] (614)

    2. [15] Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him.

      Dan Vogel: Bartleby / Job / America The Midwest Quarterly; Pittsburg Vol. 35, Iss. 2, (Winter 1994): 151.: 151.)

      "Bartleby is a picture of the new typology: "motionless [the Lawyer/Narrator describes him] ... pitiably re-spectable, incurably forlorn" (549)-like Job on his dungheap enduring the rigors and loneliness of alienation. It was not the patience of Job that impressed Melville; it was his perseverance. Significantly, in 1849, Melville had marked Job 13.15 in his new copy of the Bible, and underscored the last clause in it: ''Though he slay me, yet will I trust in him: but I will maintain mine own ways before him" (Leyda, I: 369). This ancient non-hero's heroism lay in his persistent refusal to accept the appeal to conventional compromises with bitter reality that are spouted by his four friends.

    1. A theory, in short, is some-thing a practitioner consults when he wishes to perform correctly, withthe term "correctly" here understood as meaning independently of hispreconceptions, biases, or personal preferences.

      Fish's definition of a theory.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. The conceptual vocabulary of the law, Felix Cohen, lawyer and legal realist,  complained, refers not to items in the world, but to items within its own lexicon;  the vocabulary (and therefore the law) is entirely self-enclosed, and as a result its  terms are not truly explanatory because they never come into contact with the so-  cial realities they purport to order.

      X

    2. , constraint

      Constraints

    3. In  what I earlier named a bounded-argument space these controls do not have to be  imposed by will because they are built into the structure of the discursive situation.  In a bounded-argument space, the things one is obliged to say and the things one  is forbidden to say are known in advance, either because they are set down in a list  of rules or because they are part of the tacit knowledge internalized by every  competent practitioner.

      Bounded Space definition

  9. Sep 2018
    1. If ever there were a newspaper headline custom-made for Jay Leno's monologue, this was it. Kids taking on McDonald's this week, suing the company for making them fat. Isn't that like middle-aged men suing Porsche for making them get speeding tickets? Whatever happened to personal responsibility?

      They say / Standard View

    1. THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN HAS BECOME, in two senses,an extraordinary preoccupation of the United States.

      Standard View

    Tags

    Annotators

  10. www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu
    1. students moving from FYC into other writing sites use what they have learned in the FYC class to help them complete other writing tasks

      How and if students transfer FYC skills.

    2. Our research took place at Florida State University (FSU), a large, flag-ship, Research–1 institution in the Southeast US, had IRB approval and spanned two semesters totaling thirty-five weeks, over the fall of 2009 and the spring of 2010.
    3. it was the language of the TFT course that pro-vided students with the passport to writing across multiple sites.

      "it was the language"?

    4. third,
      1. Teaching for Transfer
    5. second
      1. Cultural Studies & Media
    6. irst, an Expressivis

      1) Expressivist

    7. we pursue this question by comparing the content taught in three different sections of first-year composition and explor-ing the efficacy of each in supporting students’ transfer of writing knowl-edge and practice.

      The Method

    8. we have yet to fully explore if or how the content in a first-year composition class influences the writing knowledge and practice students develop in such a setting, and thus the knowledge and practice they can use in other sites of writing

      Transfer, definition of

    1. Abstract space is the product of a homogenizing power that as-pires to make space entirely transparent and legible, leaving no room for alternative voices.

      Rhetoric of Space and Place.

    1. ects is socially determined, and linguistic and socialprestige and stigma are intertwined. While linguists do not see these arguments asparticularly new or particularly provocative, the reaction from manyNew YorkTimesreaders appears to have been outrage.

      asdfZDFvcZXcZXc

    Annotators

    1. They should be given every right in the world, and anybody who wants to hurt them is bad.

      The classic ending which on the surface states the view the public's version of itself demands, said to undercut what the speaker has just actually said. The challenge I have with Norm is what is his own intention with it? And to me that's what makes him interesting.

      See, "He's a good man," in reference to president of NBC, who had just fired him:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tudRETrphxk

    2. Because stand-up is a form and to subvert something, you have to do it perfectly first. I remember somebody showed me a talk show with “subversion” in it — the guy chainsawed his desk. It was so stupid. Why did you build a desk in the first place if you were only going to chainsaw it? Don’t have a fucking desk! You just want little drops of subversion. Letterman in the ‘80s would be 90 percent a great talk show and then 10 percent subversion. If you get to 30 percent subversion, you’re in Andy Kaufman land. If you get to 70 percent, you’re a guy on the streets screaming at people. What are you trying to subvert anyway? Entertaining people? It’s absurd.

      James Joyce: Dubliners precedes Finnegan's Wake.

    1. At one point, Jane Fonda chides Macdonald. “I know you’ve done enough research to know [better],” she tells him, after he makes an intentional mistake about the role of a love interest in one of Fonda’s films. “I need no research to talk to you,” Macdonald responds, “because I’ve grown up with you. I’ve Jazzercised.” “That’s not what I did,” Fonda replies, referring to her workout videos, which were called Jane Fonda’s Workout. “Oh yeah, I know,” Macdonald says, “but they later called it ‘Jazzercise.’ They stole your idea.” Fonda nods, still slightly confused about what this conversation is about. It’s hard to blame her.

      Yeah, those jokes smoked right by you. The thing about being a critic is you need to understand what your critiquing or you look amateur.

    1. Because that’s just how we did it because we were men and this was our little terms of endearment. When I got mixed up with actors, I started doing that with them and they took it very personally because that’s not the way they operate. They’re more womanish, you know? So it wasn’t my fault! (l

      Norm Sexism

    1. Although the Phaedrus also criticizes the rhetoric of the day,4 it explains what an art of rhetoric would be: the speech of the true rhetorician is based on knowledge of the soul and its different forms and of the kinds of speeches appropriate to eac

      Plato's version of rhetoric

    2. e. Rhetoric is the counterpart of cookery, Socrates says, for just as cookery provides pleasure for the body with no regard for what truly benefits it, rhetoric gratifies the soul without considering its good. Consequently, rhetoric is ignoble flattery rather than art, both because it aims at the pleasant and also because it cannot give a rational account of its own activity.

      Rhetoric as bad.

    3. He wants to learn, in other words, how to "make the weaker argument the stronger" (Clouds, 112-115

      Rhetoric as slick

    1. ut thousands of begatsare only written on air,and they remain unnamed,born forgotten,or wrongly remembere

      Humans

    2. Ishtar.
    3. the Great Flood's blue-black

      Noah's Ark

    4. scripture and lore

      Culture / Ideology / Religion

    5. And a river godfashioned woman from a man's ri

      Referencing Genesis:

    6. Euphrates
    7. Tigris
    8. Go to the temple and find the Woman of Red Sashes.Bid her to use her charmsagainst the wild manwho frolics with the dumb brutes.

      hetero-normative ideology.

    9. till you are kneeling on the groundand gazing up at the sky.

      Prayer?

    10. dumb brutes of the forestand rejoice in their darkness

      differentiation between human and animal. Ideological.

    11. almost a man

      Why the distinction?

    12. our oldest law!

      Who is "our"? Inside game; cultural ideology. Universal, too?

    13. man-beast

      ideological?

    1. deliberative, forensic, and epideictic.

      The Greek epideictic means "fit for display." Thus, this branch of oratory is sometimes called "ceremonial" or "demonstrative" oratory. Epideictic oratory was oriented to public occasions calling for speech or writing in the here and now. Funeral orations are a typical example of epideictic oratory. The ends of epideictic included praise or blame, and thus the long history of encomia and invectives, in their various manifestations, can be understood in the tradition of epideictic oratory. Aristotle assigned "virtue (the noble)" and "vice (the base)" as those special topics of invention that pertained to epideictic oratory.

      Epideictic oratory was trained for in rhetorical pedagogy by way of progymnasmata exercises including the encomium and the vituperation.

      Sample Rhetorical Analysis: EPIDEICTIC ORATORY

      We can understand the dedicatory prefaces to early books and manuscripts as a species of epideictic oratory. Given the system of patronage that for so long made publication possible, one can understand the sometimes long-winded flattery of dedicatory epistles and prefaces. To praise a patron was to effect the possibility of obtaining sponsorship. One Renaissance entrepreneur inserted some 30 different dedicatory epistles into the front of different copies of his work, attempting to hedge his chances that this epideictic oratory would move at least one of his potential patrons, to whom he presented the copy.

    1. tekmeria
    2. persuasive in reference to some one

      Audience

    3. Now arguments that depend on examples are not less calculated to persuade, but those which depend upon enthymemes meet with greater approval.

      Enthymeme > Example

    4. Dialectic induction, in Rhetoric example; but when, certain things being posited, something different results by reason of them, alongside of them, from their being true, either universally or in most cases, such a conclusion in Dialectic is called a syllogism, in Rhetoric an enthymeme.

      Enthymeme = Syllogism = premise -> conclusion. Rhetorical Example = Dialectic Induction

    5. induction
    6. but where there is no certainty and there is room for doubt, our confidence is absolute

      The power of Authority, ethos. Think, Sacha Baron Cohen.

    7. in so far as it proves or seems to prove.

      Logos

    8. putting the hearer into a certain frame of mind

      Pathos

    9. moral character of the speaker

      Ethos

    10. Rhetoric then may be defined as the faculty of discovering the possible means of persuasion in reference to any subject whatever
    1. the orator should be able to prove opposites, as in logical arguments; not that we should do both (for one ought not to persuade people to do what is wrong), but that the real state of the case may not escape us, and that we ourselves may be able to counteract false arguments, if another makes an unfair use of them.

      The key sentence in this first section: truth exists; right exists; wrong exists.

    2. Nevertheless, Rhetoric is useful, because the true and the just are naturally superior to their opposites, so that, if decisions are improperly made, they must owe their defeat to their own advocates; which is reprehensible.

      Aristotle here argues that "truth" and "the just" are universally definable, discernable?

    3. wherefore one who divines well in regard to the truth will also be able to divine well in regard to probabilities

      What we might call "a fact."

    4. forensic

      Forensic Oratory

      Sometimes called "forensic" oratory, judical oratory originally had to do exclusively with the law courts and was oriented around the purposes of defending or accusing. The judicial orator made arguments about past events, and did so with respect to the two special topics of invention described by Aristotle as appropriate for this branch of oratory, the just and the injust (or the right and the wrong).

      Sample Rhetorical Analysis: JUDICIAL ORATORY In his famous speeches against Catiline, Cicero blatantly and forcefully accused Catiline of forming a conspiracy that would undermine republican Rome. Although speaking to the senate, he might as well have been speaking in a legal court, for he employed the methods and topics of judicial oratory, as though he were the prosecutor and Catiline the hapless defendant. Although Cicero lacked the solid evidence we would expect in today's courtroom, his dynamic summoning of witnesses (including the personified Rome herself!) secured popular sentiment against Catiline, and the conspirator fled the city.

    5. deliberative

      Deliberative Oratory

      Sometimes called "legislative" oratory, deliberative oratory originally had to do exclusively with that sort of speaking typical of political legislatures. This sort of oratory was oriented towards policy and thus considered the future and whether given laws would benefit or harm society. Aristotle considered four special topics of invention, grouped in pairs, to pertain to deliberative oratory:

      The good and the unworthy The advantageous, and the disadvantageous. Deliberative oratory has come to encompass any communication for or against given future action.

      Sample Rhetorical Analysis: DELIBERATIVE ORATORY When Sir Thomas More was faced with the dilemma of deciding whether to sign the oath of loyalty to Henry VIII or to abstain and be charged with treason, he must have considered deeply the effects of either choice. Should he sign, he would save his life and his influential position as Lord Chancellor, thus saving himself to further influence his sovereign and his nation for good. Should he refuse to sign, he would probably die, but his death would serve the purpose of inspiring fidelity to the Church. His martyrdom would have the advantage of increasing piety. More must have so argued within himself, deliberating as though his mind were the parliament house, divided as to the best policy for his country. In the end he persuaded himself to allow himself to be martyred, and we are left to judge whether this did indeed prove to be an advantage or not. His example of moral backbone is generally regarded as his having succeeded in making the right choice. Still, we cannot know what More could have done should he have remained in the king's service longer.

    6. the artificial proofs,

      i.e. Constructed / learned vs Natural, organic.

    7. therefore, it is proper that laws, properly enacted, should themselves define the issue of all cases as far as possible, and leave as little as possible to the discretion of the judges

      Judges: too immediate and too subjective. Begs the question, too: Can language be so precise that it bends towards objectivity?

    8. Now, previous compilers of “Arts”4 of Rhetoric have provided us with only a small portion of this art, for proofs are the only things in it that come within the province of art; everything else is merely an accessory.

      Exigence

    9. dicast

      Definition of dicast : an ancient Athenian performing the functions of both judge and juror at a trial Origin and Etymology of dicast Greek dikastēs, from dikazein to judge, from dikē judgment First Known Use: 1820

    10. enthymemes

      More info here.

      1. The informal method of reasoning typical of rhetorical discourse. The enthymeme is sometimes defined as a "truncated syllogism" since either the major or minor premise found in that more formal method of reasoning is left implied. The enthymeme typically occurs as a conclusion coupled with a reason. When several enthymemes are linked together, this becomes sorites.

      Example

      We cannot trust this man, for he has perjured himself in the past. In this enthymeme, the major premise of the complete syllogism is missing:

      Those who perjure themselves cannot be trusted. (Major premise - omitted) This man has perjured himself in the past. (Minor premise - stated) This man is not to be trusted. (Conclusion - stated) 2.

      A figure of speech which bases a conclusion on the truth of its contrary. Example

      If to be foolish is evil, then it is virtuous to be wise. This also an example of chiasmus

  11. www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu
    1. ™invention∫

      Invention.

    2. Perhaps epideictic rhetoric isbest regarded as any discourse that does not aim at a speciÆc action but isintended to inØuence the values and beliefs of the audience.

      Epideictic rhetoric

    3. udicial, deliberative, epideictic

      Aristotle's three types of rhetoric

    1. Homogeneous groups — whether they are united by ethnic background, gender or some other commonality like politics — tend to come to decisions too quickly. They settle early on a most-likely scenario and don’t question their assumptions, since everyone at the table seems to agree with the broad outline of the interpretation.A 2008 study led by the management professor Katherine Phillips using a similar investigative structure revealed an additional, seemingly counterintuitive finding: While the more diverse groups were better at reaching the truth, they were also far less confident in the decisions they made. They were both more likely to be right and, at the same time, more open to the idea that they might be wrong.

      This. Tacit

  12. Aug 2018
    1. oblatum

      oblat.um VPAR 3 2 NOM S N PERF PASSIVE PPL

      oblat.um VPAR 3 2 VOC S N PERF PASSIVE PPL

      oblat.um VPAR 3 2 ACC S M PERF PASSIVE PPL

      oblat.um VPAR 3 2 ACC S N PERF PASSIVE PPL

      oblat.um SUPINE 3 2 ACC S N<br> offero, offerre, obtuli, oblatus V [XXXAX]<br> offer; present; cause; bestow;

    2. videtur.

      vid.etur V 2 1 PRES PASSIVE IND 3 S<br> video, videre, vidi, visus V (2nd) [XXXAX]<br> see, look at; consider; (PASS) seem, seem good, appear, be seen;

    3. pertinebat

      pertin.ebat V 2 1 IMPF ACTIVE IND 3 S<br> pertineo, pertinere, pertinui, pertentus V (2nd) [XXXAX]<br> reach; extend; relate to; concerns, pertain to;

    4. sedandam

      sed.andam VPAR 1 1 ACC S F FUT PASSIVE PPL sedo, sedare, sedavi, sedatus V (1st) [XXXDX] lesser settle, allay; restrain; calm down;

    5. optandum

      opt.andum VPAR 1 1 NOM S N FUT PASSIVE PPL opt.andum VPAR 1 1 VOC S N FUT PASSIVE PPL opt.andum VPAR 1 1 ACC S M FUT PASSIVE PPL opt.andum VPAR 1 1 ACC S N FUT PASSIVE PPL opto, optare, optavi, optatus V (1st) [XXXAX]<br> choose, select; wish, wish for, desire;

    6. maxime,

      maxi.me ADJ 1 1 VOC S M SUPER<br> magnus, magna -um, major -or -us, maximus -a -um ADJ [XXXAO]<br> large/great/big/vast/huge; much; powerful; tall/long/broad; extensive/spacious; great (achievement); mighty; distinguished; skilled; bold/confident; proud; full/complete/utter/pure; intense; loud; at high price; notable/famous; old; maxi.me ADJ 0 0 VOC S M SUPER<br> maximus, maxima, maximum ADJ [XXXAO]<br> greatest/biggest/largest; longest; oldest; highest, utmost; leading, chief; maxime ADV SUPER<br> maxime ADV [XXXAO]<br> especially, chiefly; certainly; most, very much; (forms SUPER w/ADJ/ADV);

    7. Quod

      qu.od PRON 1 0 NOM S N<br> qu.od PRON 1 0 ACC S N<br> [XXXAO]<br> who; that; which, what; of which kind/degree; person/thing/time/point that; who/whatever, everyone who, all that, anything that; any; anyone/anything, any such; unspecified some; (after si/sin/sive/ne); who?, which?, what?; what kind of?; quod ADV POS<br> quod ADV [XXXDX] lesser with respect to which; quod CONJ<br> quod CONJ [XXXDX] lesser because, as far as, insofar as; [quod si => but if];

    8. conentur,

      con.entur V 1 1 PRES SUB 3 P<br> conor, conari, conatus sum V (1st) DEP [XXXBO]<br> attempt/try/endeavor, make an effort; exert oneself; try to go/rise/speak;

    Annotators

    1. In other words, Trump picked this fight—obviously poltical—because he thinks he can win it, that it works for him.

    1. “Woman to woman, I shared a connection with Omarosa as a friend and a campaign sister, and I am absolutely shocked and saddened by her betrayal and violation on a deeply personal level,” she said. “I hope it’s all worth it for you, Omarosa, because some things you just can’t put a price on.”

      Oh, this is rich!

    2. “diversity outreach,”

      Racism a la Trump.

    1. Thespace of politics is filled by dispute, contingency, inconsistency, unreason,and passion: here the arts of persuasion rule. Rhetoric is thus the key tountangling the legal and extralegal tensions shot through life in the com-munity, where the networks of identity that make up the civic self intersectand blur together

      Stanley Fish all day.

    2. Cicero, always intensively studied for thelight his work sheds on the chaotic political developments of the 60sthrough the 40s BCEand on Hellenistic philosophy, has recently foundmore readers for his rhetorical and political theory.

      New emphasis on "rhetorical and political theory" in Cicero.

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    Annotators