1,106 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2020
    1. And if that were not enough, the Bloomian reader will immediately recognize “yet once more” as the first three words of Milton’s “Lycidas,” a pastoral elegy whose speaker resists assimilation by the conventions he employs in an effort to assert a place and an identity of his own not already occupied by history.

      The goal I have for my writing classes.

  3. Jan 2020
    1. manity with

      as;ldkjfa;lskdfja;lskdjf

    2. we should no longer wonder

      lkasdjfa;lksdjf;alksdjf;alksdjf;

    3. New Literary History, 2016, 47: 67–82Getting Rid of the Appearance-Reality DistinctionRichard Rorty*Common sense distinguishes between the apparent color of a thing and its real color, betwee

      Test

    Annotators

    1. the unrelateable is necessarily ineffable and unknowable.

      Language is perception; meaning comes from relationships.

    2. He asked us to see, as he put it in The Twilight of the Idols, that “the true world” is a fable, a myth concocted by Parmenides and Plato.

      Yes!

    3. But whereas the idealists thought that philosophy could answer questions about the nature of Reality that empirical sci-ence could not, Nietzsche just wanted to stop people from posing such questions.

      Where Nietzche breaks from the Idealists

    4. Both sets of proposals, for a time at least, served those purposes well. The question of whether either or both got reality right need not arise.

      Very important point, it seems!

    5. In what follows, I shall be rehearsing some arguments put forward by Wittgenstein, and some others developed by Wilfrid Sellars, Donald Davidson, and Robert Brandom. I think that these arguments help give a plausible sense both to the claim that nature itself is a poem that we humans have written, and to the claim that the imagination is the principle vehicle of human progress.

      Thesis

    6. cogni-tive scienc

    7. Mentalese,

      Mentalese

      Often called Mentalese, the mental language resembles spoken language in several key respects: it contains words that can combine into sentences; the words and sentences are meaningful; and each sentence’s meaning depends in a systematic way upon the meanings of its component words and the way those words are combined.

    8. The Nietzschean view I have been sketching is often described as the doctrine that everything is “constituted” by language, or that everything is “socially constructed,” or that everything is “mind-dependent.”
    9. Rationality is a matter of making allowed moves within language games.

      Rationality is linguistic

    10. We only begin to have knowledge when we can formulate such thoughts as this thing has a different color than that, but the same shape.

      Meaning comes from relationships.

    11. Defenders of the Platonic tradition
    12. eschatology
    13. s inseparable from the Cartesian story about the spectator sitting in a little theater inside the skull, watching represen-tations come and go, giving them names as they pass. Sellars parodied that account when he described a child mind confronting the manifold of sense. “Ah,” this mind says to itself, “there it is now! And another one! And another—a splendid specimen! By the methods of Mill, thismust be what Mother calls ‘red’!”

      See Swift and Rabelais

    14. Getting the word “red” into circulation was a feat on a par with Newton’s persuading people to use the term “gravity.”

      Amazing

    15. It is the ability to use persuasion to get what one wants.

      rhetoric as human

    16. Unlike Hegel, and like Emerson, Nietzsche is making a purely negative point

      Adorno?

    17. Nachlass,
    18. He spells out his point by saying:

      Does this argue against O-O-O?

    19. commonplace,

      there's that word again!

    20. The Gay Science,
    21. The distinction between fantasy and imagination is between novelties that do not get taken up and put to use by one’s fellows and those that do.

      Let's ponder this a second, shall we?

      This statement reminds me of the old saying that the only difference between "crazy" and "eccentric" is money.

    22. “unmediated by language”

      "unmediated by language" The Judeo / Christian myth supports this, no?

    23. At the heart of philosophy’s quarrel with poetry is the fear that the imagination goes all the way down—that there is nothing we talk about that we might not have talked of differently.

      This differentiates Analytic Philosophy from Theory.

    24. t is the ability to use persuasion to get what one wants.

      Humans as the only rhetorical beings.

    25. For there is no such thing as the acquisition of information until there is language in which to formulate that information.

      Language is Perception.

    26. He was equally contemptuous of the more sophisticated Kantian idea that an unknowable non-spatiotemporal thing-in-itself lurks behind the phenomenal world.

      Noeumenal

    27. that a thing freed from all relationships would still be a thing . . . .”

      Meaning comes from putting two things in relation to each other.

    28. Just as the Enlightenment had deified Reason, so Shelley and other Romantics deified what I have been calling “the Imagination.”

      What is revolutionary about this?

    29. Emerson,
    30. William James

    31. Romanticism

      " a thesis about the nature of human progress. "

    32. idealism

      Idealism=a meta-physical thesis about the ultimate nature of reality,

    33. Before we can rid ourselves of ontology, we are going to have to get rid of the idea of nonlinguistic access.

      Why?

    34. When it comes to Reality, however, there is no such thing as common sense.

      Reality and Commonsense don't align.

    35. Donald Davidson

      Bio

    36. Ontology is more like a playground than like a science.

      What does this mean?

    37. cognitive access

      What does this mean?

    38. Ever since Plato, there have been people who worried about whether we can gain access to Reality, or whether the finitude of our cognitive faculties makes such access impossible.

      The question!

    39. by replacing opinion with knowledge

      How? What's the distinction?

    40. that their imaginations were more limited than ours.

      How does the imagine and reality intersect here, i.e. Language is Perception?

    41. We would express our sense of finitude not by comparing our humanity with something nonhuman but by comparing our way of being human with other, better ways that may someday be adopted by our descendants.

      How does getting rid of the Reality-Appearance distinction help us do this?

    1. a dangerous virus without a vaccine.

      That's Rhetoric, though . . . but with velocity . . .

    2. “privacy” policies are actually surveillance policies.

      Name change = perception change

    1. Brandon’s love for his community and frustration at seeing friends, family members and local businesses forced out while simultaneously watching the community become overrun by homelessness, trash, drugs and crime is what drove him to challenge Ted Lieu and put an end to the failed policies that are destroying not just coastal Los Angeles, but communities all over the nation.

      What an asshole.

  4. Dec 2019
    1. PechaKucha began because, well, because people talk too much!

      Interesting.

  5. Oct 2019
  6. Sep 2019
    1. Under the pen of Aaron Sorkin, the messy world of American politics seems solvable.

      I don't think you watched the show.

    1. These items connect an essay to a longer lineage of writers and working with these gears helps understand what kind of machine you’re working with

      They also define the Interpretative Community:

      LAST TIME I ended by suggesting that the fact of agreement, rather than being a proof of the stability of objects, is a testimony to the power of an interpretive community to constitute the objects upon which its members (also and simultaneously constituted) can then agree.

      from "What Makes an Interpretation Acceptable?"

    2. HOW one constructs a problem IS the problem

      So well put.

    1. CHAPTER5ACADEMICARGUMENTSISaidThatFirst:BeingOriginalIFYOU

      Testing

    Annotators

    1. the need to join, in a reasoned way, a conversation of differing voices.

      Joining a conversation.

    2. Whether I ’ m for or against.

      But who cares, right?

    3. they do not see that a thesis implies a counterthesis and that the presence of opposing or alternative voices implies a view of knowledge as dialogic, contingent, ambiguous, and tentative.

      A=B

    4. Although experts largely agree on what critical thinking means, they often disagree on how to teach it or to assess it.

      They Say / I say

    5. This metapho
    6. It is the challenge of faculty across the disciplines, along with their colleagues in writing pro-grams and writing centers — to show them other ways of imagining writing.

      Thesis

    7. To put it another way,

      Metacommentary

    8. The problem with traditional writing instruction was that it led to a view of writing as a set of isolated skills unconnected to an authentic desire to converse with interested readers about real ideas.

      Too constructed.

  7. Aug 2019
    1. Give both men 30 seconds to solo, and Frusciante would blow Young off the stage, just as Duane Allman would blow Frusciante off the stage. Young is something else, though.
    1. Even if you choose not to use Wi-Fi services we make available at MGM Resorts, we may still collect information concerning the precise physical location of your mobile device within and around MGM Resorts for non-marketing purposes. 

      Holy cow

    1. s led by sociopaths who politicized language,

      Peggy Noonan doing her best 18th Brumaire rip off.That's right, Peggy Noonan is stealing from Marx.

  8. Jul 2019
  9. Jun 2019
  10. www.joinhoney.com www.joinhoney.com
    1. Honey’s products do not support Do Not Track requests at this time, which means that we collect information about your online activity while you are using Honey’s products in the manner described above.

      So even if you ask us not to track you, we will anyway.

    2. Once you delete your profile, there is no longer any data attributable to you.

      Which means they do not delete all your information.

    3. After you have terminated your use of Honey’s products, we will store your information in an aggregated and anonymised format.

      We keep your info forever, in other words.

    4. as long as is required

      Which is?

    5. That means while you are using the Extension and Honey is saving you money,

      Slickly written. These dudes are good!

    6. we believe

      Trust us!

    7. While you are using the Extension, this does NOT include any information from your search engine history or from your email.

      Trust us!

    1. if they pay rent on time

      So now corporations get to know if you pay your rent on time?

    2. “We can predict if residents are happy based on their digital interactions with the service, which gives us more information about whether they will renew their leases,” says Zego CEO Adam Blake.

      happy? Defined as? Lisa Feldman Barrett, the Neuroscientist and author of How Emotions are Made, argues that emotions are constructed. In other words, who gets to say what is "happy"? Adam Blake does?

  11. May 2019
    1. forced out by the majority group, I believe it merits a moment of our thought. Why is this occurring? How are those being gentrified affected? Should this be addressed? How so? These are the types of questions we should be asking ourselves so that we as a society can make more intentional, informed decisions in the future rather than acting as if all of our actions occur in a vacuum where no such thing as a ripple effect exist.

      Good conclusion.

    2. no longer afford to live there.

      Good link. Interestingly, it references Whitman-Walker, which has now also sold out to Condos . . .

    3. However, the increasing prices in Dupont Circle are not only affecting businesses; they are affecting people too.

      Strong transition

    4. close, including Schwartz Pharmacy, Janus Theater, and Larimer’s market

      Good.

    5. strongly indicates

      Well, some might counter that this is a small sample size, so are those two others already flush with cash? Or are they taking a different approach?

    6. due to the fact that

      because

    1. It continues today with a half dozen offices in the region, and while it serves all clients, regardless of identity, it maintains its commitment to LGBT-oriented care.

      Not any more!

  12. Apr 2019
    1. the Saturn AURA
    2. I Love the 90s
    3. I Love the 80s,
    4. I Love the 70s
    5. d, however, t

      Transition / connecting words

    6. Think, say, of the recent TV commercial for the Saturn AURA

      Explains the Quote.

    7. First, "postmodernism is the consumption of sheer commodification as a process."

      Textual evidence.

    8. Marxism, as Jameson formulates it,

      Positionality

    9. For Jameson,

      Uses voice markers to show positionality.

    10. "Wait, tell me one more time. What’s postmodernism?"

      First sentence states the problem

    11. In Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (1991), J
    12. Marxism? Yes, relax:

      Entertaining objections

  13. Mar 2019
    1. Weeks later, Trump signed the CLOUD Act into law, which gave US law enforcement more legal pathways to pursue data stories overseas. The provision was tucked into the $1.3 trillion spending bill Trump signed to avoid a federal government shutdown. With the new law on the books, federal prosecutors went back to court in and asked for another warrant to get the materials that Google refused to turn over. In an April 2018 affidavit, the FBI agent argued that "providers are required to disclose data even if it is stored abroad" under the new law. The judge approved the new search warrant later that day, giving investigators access to additional information from Google, including Cohen's emails, attachments, address book and files stored on Google Drive.

      Wow. What if it was a pole got that snuck in the bill for this very reason? Or was it just luck?

  14. Feb 2019
    1. “(There is) $65 million for studying salmon. Man, you can go to the Red Lobster and study it for $12.95,” he said. “That’s ridiculous … We didn’t do anything, just spent you all’s money. It’s a disgrace.”

      This makes Tim Burchett look as dumb as he actually is. This kind of logic is dumbfoundingly stupid, particularly from an elected official.

    1. Thethrillofthinking,thepleasureofthought

      then is it as marvellous a thing in him, . . .

      Intellectual exciting for Melville.

    2. Euclid

      The Free Masons seem attracted to him.

      Some Euclid Background

    3. hisgreatnovel
    4. Melville
    5. syllogisms

      More info

      The classic example:

      All whales are animals that breathe by means of lungs.<br> All whales are mammals.<br> All whales are animals that breath by means of lungs.<br>

      In the Prior Analytics, Aristotle presents the first system of logic, the theory of the syllogism (see the entry on Aristotle's logic and ch. 1 of Lagerlund 2000 for further details). A syllogism is a deduction consisting of three sentences: two premises and a conclusion. Syllogistic sentences are categorical sentences involving a subject and a predicate connected by a copula (verb). These are in turn divided into four different classes: universal affirmative (A), particular affirmative (I), universal negative (E) and particular negative (O), written by Aristotle as follows:

      A – A belongs to all B (AaB) I – A belongs to some B (AiB) E – A does not belong to any B (AeB) O – A does not belong to some B (AoB)

    6. bestiaries

      A Medieval term

      The bestiary, or "book of beasts", is more than just an expansion of the Physiologus, though the two have much in common. The bestiary also describes a beast and uses that description as a basis for an allegorical teaching, but by including text from other sources it goes further; and while still not a "zoology textbook", it is not only a religious text, but also a description of the world as it was known.

      The bestiary manuscripts were usually illustrated, sometimes lavishly, as for example in the Harley Bestiary and the Aberdeen Bestiary; the pictures served as a "visual language" for the illiterate public, who knew the stories - preachers used them in sermons - and would remember the moral teaching when they saw the beast depicted. Bestiary images could be found everywhere.

    1. You may seen on Inside

      This is getting worse than a high school essay.

    2. “Having played in that offense, they don’t have an answer for all-out pressure,” Hoyer says. “Their answer is for the quarterback to make a play.” BENOIT: Super Bowl LIII Tale of the Tape: Two Dominant Defenses, Gurley’s Disappearance and the Real MVP The flip side? In this cat-and-mouse game, the Patriots knew McVay’s offense had different ways it could crush all-out pressure, so Flores had to be judicious about calling it. New England showed pressure a ton, but didn’t send everyone much at all.

      What the hell? This totally contradicts itself, it seems. I've read it now three times, and I still can't figure out the hell it means.

    3. At Devin McCourty’s kitchen table on Friday, the the brothers brought up Hoyer’s value, Devin remembers a moment a moment during the team’s preparation for Kansas City in October when the first defense showed the scout team a blitz look that had all 11 defenders within 10 yards of the line of scrimmage.

      What the hell?

  15. Jan 2019
    1. ItallowsustothinkofHegelasatheoristwhomadepossibletheinsightsthat“alltruthsareatbestmomentary,situational,andmarkedbyahistoryintheprocessofchangeandtransformation,”that“conceptsarenotautonomousbutratherrelational,”andthatthe“philosophicalproblem”is,“namely,thatofrepresentation,anditsdilemmas,itsdialectic,itsfailures,anditsimpossibility.

      This is the key to it all.

    2. ThisAdornianideaofthreadingtheHegelianneedle

      Repeat with a difference

    3. desideratum
    4. extirpated
    5. indeliblylinguistic:dialectic.

      The dialectic is logos, linguistic.

    6. TheaimofthisbookistogetbehindthatmediatingscriminordertothinkaboutHegel’sworkdirectly,unencumberedbytheweightofHegelianismsandenergizedbyhisdaringappropriationofthedialecticofidentityanddifference.Itisalsotoindicatesomethingspecificbytheword“theory.

      Needs us to forget what we've falsely been taught about Hegel.

    7. Hegelresponsible

      What Hegel's critics say.

    8. Inthisbook,IdemonstratehowHegel’sdialecticemergedfromthephilosophicalpracticesofmedievalthinkers,mappingaspreciselyaspossiblethelineamentsofHegel’sdebtandtheimplicationsofacknowledgingthatdebt(chaps.1and2)

      Thesis.

    9. Hegelrecuperatesthedialecticofidentityanddifference

      Identity and Difference is what makes the Hegelian Dialectic.

    10. Fordialectic,likethewhale,regardstwodistinctpictures,twodifferentideas,andcombinesthemintoasinglethought.

      Definition of Hegelian Dialiectic

    11. Thethrillofthinking,thepleasureofthought,comesinthismomentof“combining...twodistinctprospects”acrossthegreatexpanse,overcomingnothingnessinturn.
    12. Fortoseetwothingsatonceispossibleonlyontwoconditions:

      The problem that the Hegelian dialectic solves.

    1. Collective bargaining in action. And, more importantly perhaps, this puts Unions as a power to the people backstop. The action of Federal Employees, unionized, who could just stop showing up without fear of being fired is what we should be selling.

    1. there's always a race to be the last one to talk to Haslam before a big decision

      Sounds like Trump!

    2. Haslam told the group he felt Jackson could relate better to players.

      He's trying?

    1. But of course I can never be sure if the guy actually believes what he's saying or is just fucking around.

      Exactly!

  16. Dec 2018
  17. Nov 2018
    1. And where we normally approach such environments as fi xed, I treat them here as plastic, made by particular human

      What does he mean here?

    Annotators

    1. "Ah seen de pitchers of Henry Ford and he's a spare-built man and Rockefeller look lak he ain't got but one gut.

      Heroic figures? Icons?

    Annotators

    1. The original Americans who came over from Europe and founded this country

      This makes no sense. How can one be original but not be original?

    1. carte blanche leash

      Please don't let this become a thing: carte blanche leash.

    2. The Uber took a ‘weird way,’ is code for a girl really ran 20 minutes late.

      And is a stupid person's way of making a bad excuse, since all ride services use Waze or GMaps.

    3. Founding Farmers
    4. “It just seems like she’s playing a character,” she says. “I just wonder, if those views had not started gaining her attention, would we be getting this version of Britt McHenry?”

      Bingo!

    5. “I always try to give people the benefit of the doubt, and I wish sometimes that was reciprocated for me, because I had to work really hard

      Classic white aggrievement. Nowhere does she feel bad for the other human. She's all, "me me me!"

    6. That’s why I have a degree and you don’t” and “Maybe if I was missing some teeth they would hire me, huh?
    7. Tennys Sandgren
    1. The researchers hypothesized that, because students can type faster

      Her evidence for why students learn less with laptops

    2. Laptops distract from learning, both for users and for those around them

      Supporting evidence for why she wants to ban laptops.

    3. They also tend to earn worse grades

      2nd reason she wants to ban laptops.

    4. college students learn less when they use computers or tablets during lectures.

      First reason she wants to ban laptops.

    1. of R

      asdfasdfasdf

    Annotators

    1. DAVIDFLEMINGRevitalizing the Public Spherein Metropolitan AmericaCityo

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    2. City of R

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    Annotators

    1. City of

      yrtesfdgsfdgsdfgsdfgsdfg

    2. ity

      sdfgsdfgsdfg

    Annotators

    1. DAVIDFLEMINGRevitalizing the Public Spherein Metropolitan AmericaCity

      asdfasdfaksdfj;alks/dfj

    2. City of RhetoricFleming, David. City of Rhetoric : Revitalizing

      asdfasdfgasdf

    3. City of

      asdfasdfasdfasdfasdf

    4. of Rhet

      asdfasdf

    Annotators

    1. City

      Testing

    Annotators

    1. That’s a discourse whose rhetorical modality or temporality is the future anterior. It is the threat of the catastrophe that will have been ours if we do not do X, Y, and Z. So you have this phantasmatic production of the apocalypse.

      This is a way to consider this Referendum:

      Shall property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?

    2. itself as not political.

      Such a key concept, I think. In fact, I'd say this is the US Dividing line.

    3. culture industry

      Theodor Adorno, The Culture Industry

    4. Enola Gay controversy
    5. calculative and meditative

      Here's a random student's thought on this:

    6. that text again
    7. Martin Heidegger

      Martin Heidegger A very important philosopher. Most recently, his work has inspired a relatively new movement, Object-Oriented Ontology.

    8. IBM Selectric.
  18. Oct 2018
    1. y friend, classmate, and floormate, Eryka,

      ;weiarjq;lwkaejra;lsdkfj

    2. ertain aspects,

      This is my annotation.