13 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. It was indeed a paradise

      At this moment the Creature appears more strongly associated with Adam than with Satan, apparently born into a "paradise."

    2. Pandæmonium

      Pandaemonium ("All demons" in Latin), was the capital of Hell in Milton's Paradise Lost (II.119-69).

    3. Like Adam

      From Milton's poem the Creature imagines himself as an Adam created by an all-powerful god (Victor). Later in the paragraph, the Creature considers if a more apt comparison for his condition might be to Satan, cast out from his companions and protector.

    4. sent me forth to this insupportable misery

      The Creature compares himself to Milton's Satan in Paradise Lost, which he has previously heard when Felix read the poem aloud.

    5. Evil thenceforth became my good.

      The Creature refers to Satan's confession in Milton's Paradise Lost: "all Good to me is lost; / Evil be thou my Good" (4:109-110).

    1. While neither the feeling of remorse of self accusation mingled with my throes; although the contempt with I was treated also prevented any sublime defiance to have a place in my mind.

      The Thomas Copy qualifies the Creature's comparison of himself to Milton's Satan. Both are outcasts treated with contempt, but unlike Satan, the Creature suffers this condition without conceiving himself as proudly rebellious against his oppressors.

  2. Jul 2018
    1. Others more mild

      Milton is godlike in the sublime pathetic. In Demons, fallen Angels, and Monsters the delicacies of passion living in and from their immortality, is of the most softening and dissolving nature. It is carried to the utmost here.

    2. To be invulnerable in those bright arms,

      This same Sin, a female, and with a feminine instinct for the showy & martial is in pain lest death should sully Satan's bright arms.

    3. Their song was partial

      nothing can express the sensation one feels at 'Their song was partial &[c]. Examples of this nature are divine to the utmost in other poets—in Caliban 'Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments' &c[.] In Theocritus'———Polyphemus—and Homers Hym to Pan where Mercury is represented as taking his 'homely fac'd' to heaven. There are numerous other instances in Milton— 'Tears such as Angels weep'.

    4. Dear Daughter

      Satan's progeny [not highlighted by Keats, but stated in margin pp. 44-5]

    5. Pensive here I sat Alone;

      divine to the utmost

    6. 44
    7. [Note in Keats's Hand Text circles around the outside margins (top, bottom, left, right) of the two pages, 44 and 45]