26 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
  2. Dec 2021
    1. “I could fit this in my pocket,” I thought when the first newly re-designed @parisreview arrived. And sure enough editor Emily Stokes said it’s was made to fit in a “large coat pocket” in the editor’s note.

      I've been thinking it for a while, but have needed to write it down for ages---particularly from my experiences with older manuscripts.

      In an age of print-on-demand and reflowing text, why in goodness' name don't we have the ability to print almost anything we buy and are going to read in any font size and format we like?

      Why couldn't I have a presentation copy sized version of The Paris Review?

      Why shouldn't I be able to have everything printed on bible-thin pages of paper for savings in thickness?

      Why couldn't my textbooks be printed with massively large margins for writing notes into more easily? Why not interleaved with blank pages even? Particularly near the homework problem sections?

      Why can't I have more choice in a range of fonts, book sizes, margin sizes, and covers?

  3. Nov 2021
  4. Sep 2021
    1. Each was a small library in its own right, with slabs of text arranged in monumental double columns. The Great Books of the Western World were what books should not be: an antidote to pleasure.

      This reminds me that books should have massively larger margins for writing notes.

    1. Most of us were taught as children to treat books as something sacred—no folding the page corners, and no writing in the margins, ever.

      Most Medieval manuscripts specifically left wide columns of space to encourage readers to mark up their texts.

      cross reference: Medieval notepads - Khan Academy

      <small>Detail, London, British Library, Harley MS 3487 (13th century)—[source](http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/ILLUMIN.ASP?Size=mid&IllID=16790)</small>

  5. Aug 2021
    1. The most common and sensible location for putting down thoughts, critique or notes was the margin of the medieval book. Consider this: you wouldn’t think so looking at a medieval page, but on average only half of it was filled with the actual text. A shocking fifty to sixty percent was designed to be margin. As inefficient as this may seem, the space came in handy for the reader. As the Middle Ages progressed it became more and more common to resort to the margin for note-taking.
    1. Like so manynaturalists of the Enlightenment, he was familiar with a wide variety of textual techniques, manyof which were direct descendants of the compositional and pedagogical tools used to harness themnemonic utility of words inscribed on the clean spaces of erasable surfaces such as librellos dememoria and chalk boards, or upon more permanent forms of print such as commonplace books(adversaria), cabinet labels, marginaliaand printed books.

      Some interesting concepts to explore here.

  6. Mar 2021
  7. Oct 2020
  8. Sep 2020
    1. At this point, you start to engage your mind and dig into the work required to understand what’s being said. I highly recommend you use marginalia to converse with the author.

      From the linked article

      Full ownership of a book only comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it— which comes to the same thing— is by writing in it.

      Really love that quote - the idea of [[marginalia]] is to write in the margins, take notes as you read - to ask questions and answer them, and context around the highlights.

      In turn, [[make the book your own]]

  9. Sep 2019
    1. contributing new media to the text

      <iframe title="vimeo-player" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/70518465" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> This Huntington video shows a strategy that grangerizers often used to embed images within existing texts.

      How to Inlay a Print [in-gallery video] (EXHIBITIONS | Illuminated Palaces) from The Huntington on Vimeo.

    2. Marginalia

      Remi Kalir and Antero Garcia are in the process of revising and gathering feedback on their forthcoming book, Annotation. The early drafts of this book came out after I first composed this section of The Woman in White: Grangerized. I'm thrilled to be reading Kalir and Garcia's text in the present and am looking forward to drawing in some of their points in this critical edition. Future additions of this chapter will reflect their thoughtful, exciting work!

  10. Jun 2019
  11. mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu
    1. 1819 that Samuel Taylor Coleridge first used the term “marginalia,” from the Latin marginalis (or “in the margin”), when, as a literary critic, he wrote about another author’s work for Blackwood’s Magazine.
    2. The Scottish author Kenneth Grahame, best known for his novel The Wind in the Willows, observed in an 1892 essay, “The child’s scribbling on the margin of his school-books is really worth more to him than all he gets out of them.”7Kenneth Grahame, “Marginalia," Pagan Papers (1898), https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5319.
  12. May 2019
    1. Inscribed gift books also supported later efforts to promote women’s rights (Rappoport 10)

      Writing inscriptions and irreverent marginal notes in books also has a role in feminist activism today. As one example, the Double Union feminist coding space in San Francisco, USA, has a copy of the book Lean In on its shelves that participants are invited to write critiques in together.

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=16" width="959" height="1463" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

      For more information, see Rebecca Greenfield's article, "Why Silicon Valley Needs The Coder Grrrls Of Double Union, The Feminist Hacker Space." Fast Company, 14 July 2014, https://www.fastcompany.com/3031944/why-silicon-valley-needs-the-coder-grrrls-of-double-union-the-feminist. Permalink: https://perma.cc/462U-ER3L

  13. Sep 2018
    1. genuinely new

      Not totally new, right? I'm thinking of library book marginalia, and maybe used book mark-up, as well, per this screen capture of a Columbia Buy Sell Memes offering.

  14. Jul 2018
    1. Others more mild

      Milton is godlike in the sublime pathetic. In Demons, fallen Angels, and Monsters the delicacies of passion living in and from their immortality, is of the most softening and dissolving nature. It is carried to the utmost here.

    2. To be invulnerable in those bright arms,

      This same Sin, a female, and with a feminine instinct for the showy & martial is in pain lest death should sully Satan's bright arms.

    3. Their song was partial

      nothing can express the sensation one feels at 'Their song was partial &[c]. Examples of this nature are divine to the utmost in other poets—in Caliban 'Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments' &c[.] In Theocritus'———Polyphemus—and Homers Hym to Pan where Mercury is represented as taking his 'homely fac'd' to heaven. There are numerous other instances in Milton— 'Tears such as Angels weep'.

    4. Dear Daughter

      Satan's progeny [not highlighted by Keats, but stated in margin pp. 44-5]

    5. [Note in Keats's Hand Text circles around the outside margins (top, bottom, left, right) of the two pages, 44 and 45]

  15. Jun 2018
    1. This is due to a natural human reaction to “Google” someone before we meet them for the first time. Before we show up to teach a class, take a class, interview for a job, go on a date…we’ve been reviewed online. Other people use the trail of breadcrumbs that we’ve left behind to make judgements about us. The question/challenge is that this trail of breadcrumbs is usually incomplete, and locked up in various silos. You may have bits of your identity in Facebook or Twitter, while you have other parts locked up in Instagram, Snapchat, or LinkedIn. What do these incomplete pieces say about you? Furthermore, are they getting the entire picture of you when they uncover certain details? Can they look back to see what else you’re interested in? Can they see how you think all of these interests fit together…or they seeing the tail end of a feverish bout of sharing cat pics?

      I can't help but think that doing this is a form of cultural anthropology being practiced contemporaneously.

      Which is more likely: someone a 100 years from now delving into my life via my personal website that aggregated everything or scholars attempting to piece it all back together from hundreds of other sites? Even with advanced AI techniques, I think the former is far more likely.

      Of course I also think about what @Undine is posting about cats on Twitter or perhaps following #marginaliamonday and cats, and they're at least taking things to a whole new level of scholarship.


      [also on boffosocko.com]

  16. Mar 2017
    1. copying a manuscript of this kind proceeded at the rate of about one (two-sided) folio per day; pecia rentals typically lasted one week and involved about four folios.
  17. Dec 2016
  18. Oct 2016
    1. In a Hewlett Packard online survey of 527 college students at San Jose State University, 57 percent of students who responded said they preferred print materials to e-books when studying. When citing reasons for their preference, 35 percent of print users cited “note-taking ability” as a reason for preferring print vs. six percent of those who favored e-books.

      Great stat for hypothes.is..

  19. Oct 2014