192 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. Ideally, an open pedagogy project explicitly welcomes future participation and adaptation (Robbins, “Guidelines”).

      Timothy Robbins emphasizes this goal in his guidelines for contributors to the latest Rebus Community iteration of the Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature. In a distillation I find particularly elegant, he notes: "In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge" ("Guidelines: Section Introductions.") 

    1. “But then again,” a person who used information in this way might say, “it’s not like I would be deliberately discriminating against anyone. It’s just an unfortunate proxy variable for lack of privilege and proximity to state violence.”[10]

      In the current universe, Twitter also makes a number of predictions about users that could be used as proxy variables for economic and cultural characteristics. It can display things like your audience's net worth as well as indicators commonly linked to political orientation. Triangulating some of this data could allow for other forms of intended or unintended discrimination.

      I've already been able to view a wide range (possibly spurious) information about my own reading audience through these analytics. On September 9th, 2019, I started a Twitter account for my 19th Century Open Pedagogy project and began serializing installments of critical edition, The Woman in White: Grangerized. The @OPP19c Twitter account has 62 followers as of September 17th.

      Having followers means I have access to an audience analytics toolbar. Some of the account's followers are nineteenth-century studies or pedagogy organizations rather than individuals. Twitter tracks each account as an individual, however, and I was surprised to see some of the demographics Twitter broke them down into. (If you're one of these followers: thank you and sorry. I find this data a bit uncomfortable.)

      Within this dashboard, I have a "Consumer Buying Styles" display that identifies categories such as "quick and easy" "ethnic explorers" "value conscious" and "weight conscious." These categories strike me as equal parts confusing and problematic: (Link to image expansion)

      I have a "Marital Status" toolbar alleging that 52% of my audience is married and 49% single.

      I also have a "Home Ownership" chart. (I'm presuming that the Elizabeth Gaskell House Museum's Twitter is counted as an owner...)

      ....and more

    2. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them.

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/undissertating19c/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=12" width="959" height="353" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

    3. browsers and apps are able to log a wide range of user engagement events such as clicks, scrolling, or points when users’ cursors travel over a particular place on the page

      As of 2019, the website clickclickclick.click playfully dramatizes what your browser can tell people about your interactions with it.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. This content is password protected

      This content is still under development. Please check back soon for the official version! If you would like to be a beta-reader for this section, I'd welcome your thoughts. Feel free to contact me at nsalmon [at] wisc [dot] edu.

    2. “But then again,” a person who used information in this way might say, “it’s not like I would be deliberately discriminating against anyone. It’s just an unfortunate proxy variable for lack of privilege and proximity to state violence.

      In the current universe, Twitter also makes a number of predictions about users that could be used as proxy variables for economic and cultural characteristics. It can display things like your audience's net worth as well as indicators commonly linked to political orientation. Triangulating some of this data could allow for other forms of intended or unintended discrimination.

      I've already been able to view a wide range (possibly spurious) information about my own reading audience through these analytics. On September 9th, 2019, I started a Twitter account for my 19th Century Open Pedagogy project and began serializing installments of critical edition, The Woman in White: Grangerized. The @OPP19c Twitter account has 62 followers as of September 17th.

      Having followers means I have access to an audience analytics toolbar. Some of the account's followers are nineteenth-century studies or pedagogy organizations rather than individuals. Twitter tracks each account as an individual, however, and I was surprised to see some of the demographics Twitter broke them down into. (If you're one of these followers: thank you and sorry. I find this data a bit uncomfortable.)

      Within this dashboard, I have a "Consumer Buying Styles" display that identifies categories such as "quick and easy" "ethnic explorers" "value conscious" and "weight conscious." These categories strike me as equal parts confusing and problematic: (Link to image expansion)

      I have a "Marital Status" toolbar alleging that 52% of my audience is married and 49% single.

      I also have a "Home Ownership" chart. (I'm presuming that the Elizabeth Gaskell House Museum's Twitter is counted as an owner...)

      ....and more

    3. browsers and apps are able to log a wide range of user engagement events such as hyperlink clicks, scrolling, or points when users’ cursors travel over a particular place on the page

      As of 2019, the website clickclickclick.click playfully dramatizes what your browser can tell people about your interactions with it.

    4. This content is password protected.

      This section of Undissertating is in development is not yet published to a wider readership, but will be soon.

      If, however, you're excited to chat about it in advance, please feel free to reach out on Twitter at @Naomi_Salmon and we can figure out a mode of conversation from there!

    1. This content is password protected

      This content is still under development. Please check back soon for the official version! If you would like to be a beta-reader for this section, I'd welcome your thoughts. Feel free to contact me at nsalmon [at] wisc [dot] edu.

    1. information privilege

      Char Brooks's 2014 post "On Information Privilege" examines this topic from Brooks's perspective as a librarian and educator.

      Duke University's Library 101 Toolkit provides additional information, classroom activities, student readings, and a CC-BY-NC-licensed infographic about information privilege. (Click infographic hyperlink for larger version.)

      Works Cited:

      Brooks, Char. "On Information Privilege" Infomational, 1 December 2014, https://infomational.com/2014/12/01/on-information-privilege/. Permalink: perma.cc/Y7AT-C6VZ.

      "Information Privilege." Library 101 Tookit, Duke University, 13 August 2018, https://sites.duke.edu/library101_instructors/2018/08/13/information-privilege/. Permalink: perma.cc/DNY3-HHUM.

    1. contributing new media to the text

      <iframe title="vimeo-player" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/70518465" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> This Huntington video shows a strategy that grangerizers often used to embed images within existing texts.

      How to Inlay a Print [in-gallery video] (EXHIBITIONS | Illuminated Palaces) from The Huntington on Vimeo.

    2. Reading Histories

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    3. Marginalia

      Remi Kalir and Antero Garcia are in the process of revising and gathering feedback on their forthcoming book, Annotation. The early drafts of this book came out after I first composed this section of The Woman in White: Grangerized. I'm thrilled to be reading Kalir and Garcia's text in the present and am looking forward to drawing in some of their points in this critical edition. Future additions of this chapter will reflect their thoughtful, exciting work!

    1. separate public domain illustrations

      The main source images for this collage:

      Borrow, George Henry, and E. J. Sullivan. "I did not like reviewing at all--it was not to my taste." Lavengro, Macmillan and Co., London, 1896, p. 296. British Library Flickr, HMNTS 012621.h.20. Accessed 1 February 2018.

      Dodge, Mary Elizabeth. "A Terrible Tiger." When Life is Young: a Collection of Verse for Boys and Girls, Century Co., 1894, New York, p. 201. British Library Flickr. Accessed 1 February 2018.

    2. Specialty areas that present a more level playing field for access to the primary and secondary sources at the heart of their conversations have the potential to be more inclusive than others

      Jeff Spies of the Center for Open Science provides an anecdote about this process at work in other fields in an interview with documentarians for the film Paywall. He notes:

      "Research efficiency comes with increases in quality, increases in inclusivity, increases in diversity, increases in innovation. . . . I had a visit to the University of Belgrade a few years ago, and I was meeting with grad students before my lecture, and we were going around the room talking about what each researcher did and were working on for their thesis. And almost everyone in the room was working on implicit cognition. And it was amazing that there were so many students working on this particular area of research, and so I said, 'Why are all of you doing this? How has that become this be the area that's so popular?' And the immediate response was, 'Well, we can access the literature in this area.' 'What do you mean?' I said. 'Well, there is a norm of all the leading researchers in your field: all of you put your papers online. So, we can find them and we can know what’s going on right now in this literature that we can’t get access to in other sub-disciplines.' I was blown away by that, right? That they made some decisions about what to study based on what they could access (Paywall 00:16:19 - 00:17:54)

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    1. And the best part is, you don’t have to worry about overlooking anyone since over two million students at 2,000 schools and 90 countries use Piazza and have opted-in to be discovered by employers.

      "You don't have to worry about overlooking anyone"... except the students who have personal reasons to be wary of opting into data collection about their learning.

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  3. Aug 2019
    1. How do you feel about writing in books?

      We welcome you to share your own answers to this question! (Opens in new window.)

      Below are participant responses to the survey questions.

      Click the "more" button at the bottom right corner of this annotation to see additional survey responses. You can also [view the results in a larger page] (https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/back-matter/poll-results/). (Opens in new window)

      If you see error messages in the frames below, try opening this text in another browser.

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  4. May 2019
    1. The English intellect is sound, so far as it goes,” he continued, seating himself at the table; ” but it has one grave defect—it is always cautious in the wrong place.”

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to these lines in a series of excerpts about Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. When an English jury has to choose between a plain fact, on the surface, and a long explanation under the surface, it always takes the fact, in preference to the explanation.

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to this sentence in a series of excerpts about Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. Any woman who is sure of her own wits, is a match, at any time, for a man who is not sure of his own temper.

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to this sentence in a series of excerpts about Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. Men little know, when they say hard things to us, how well we remember them, and how much harm they do us.

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to these lines in a series of excerpts about Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    2. Women can resist a man’s love, a man’s fame, a man’s personal appearance, and a man’s money; but they cannot resist a man’s tongue, when he knows how to talk to them.[

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to this sentence in a series of excerpts about Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service.

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to this final sentence in a series of excerpts used to illustrate Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. There are many varieties of sharp practitioners in this world, but, I think, the hardest of all to deal with are the men who overreach you under the disguise of inveterate good humour. A fat, well-fed, smiling, friendly man of business is of all parties to a bargain the most hopeless to deal with. Mr. Merriman was one of this class.

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to these lines in a series of excerpts used to illustrate Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. When two members of a family, or two intimate friends, are separated, and one goes abroad and one remains at home, the return of the relative or friend who has been travelling, always seems to place the relative or friend who has been staying at home at a painful disadvantage, when the two first meet

      The September 8, 1860 Literary Gazette review of The Woman in White calls attention to these lines in a series of excerpts used to illustrate Wilkie Collins's style and characterization.

    1. The extra-illustration fad started in eighteenth-century England as a way for gentlemen to demonstrate their wealth and taste by essentially recreating a book with costly prints
    2. Extra-illustrators took apart existing books, inserting pictures, autographs, and other material with some relationship to the original, often having them expensively rebound. In an extra-illustrated theater history, for example, a reference to the actor "Garrick's drama of 'Gulliver in Lilliput'" is followed by three small pictures of Jonathan Swift (each mounted on a full page), playbills, a two-page print depicting Gulliver at Brobdingnag and a series of other tangentially related illustrations. When an extra-illustrator was done with it, a 250-page book might have been enlarged to ten volumes. Extra-illustration transformed ordinary books into a frame or armature for the compiler's collection of visual images; sometimes the leaves of the original text are hard to find between the pages of prints.
    3. To ensure that the extra-illustrated book would not be mistaken for a scrapbook, one authority explained that grangerizers should add magazine and newspaper articles only if they had the paper split (literally separating its front and back faces), so that type appeared only on one side—something the average scrapbook-maker could not afford. Such an article would evidently be valued for its now specialized visual qualities and the expense of preparing it for extra-illustration, not just for its particular content.
    1. Inscribed gift books also supported later efforts to promote women’s rights (Rappoport 10)

      Writing inscriptions and irreverent marginal notes in books also has a role in feminist activism today. As one example, the Double Union feminist coding space in San Francisco, USA, has a copy of the book Lean In on its shelves that participants are invited to write critiques in together.

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=16" width="959" height="1463" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

      For more information, see Rebecca Greenfield's article, "Why Silicon Valley Needs The Coder Grrrls Of Double Union, The Feminist Hacker Space." Fast Company, 14 July 2014, https://www.fastcompany.com/3031944/why-silicon-valley-needs-the-coder-grrrls-of-double-union-the-feminist. Permalink: https://perma.cc/462U-ER3L

    1. Limited reading platforms are especially frustrating at a time when new trends in application development are expanding how writers can speak to one another in the margins, extra-illustrate their notes, or reorganize and juxtapose quotations in a dynamic network.

      Two examples of such platforms:

      1. Hypothes.is, the social annotation app where this very note lives, and
      2. the LiquidText app (pictured below and in text), a program that allows scholars to view all of their highlights within a document at once, quickly copy-paste for notetaking, organize their notes into a mind-map, and draw on all of these notes using a stylus.

      Screenshot subject: Cronin, Catherine. Openness and praxis: A situated study of academic staff meaning-making and decision-making with respect to openness and use of open educational practices in higher education. 2018, PhD Dissertation, National University of Ireland--Galway. http://hdl.handle.net/10379/7276. (CC-BY-NC-ND)

      A personal anecdote: before I started working with these apps, I spent a long time pasting physical cutouts from texts onto a huge scroll of butcher paper that would fill my living room. Being able to spatially organize ideas using string and sticky-notes or nonlinear note-taking apps is important to my own research process.

  5. Apr 2019
    1. 5 May 1860

      The day before this installment hit the shelves, the Hull Packet and East Riding Times (a periodical published in a town in Yorkshire, England) weighed in on Collins's use of letters and found documents in his novel:

      In All the Year Round, Mr Wilkie Collins, whose Antonina made him suddenly famous, is continuing his most exciting story of “The Woman in White” Usually novels composed of extracts from the letters and diaries of the characters moving in the story, are failures: and to this rule Sir Walter Scott’s Red Gauntlet, even, is no exception. Mr Wilkie Collins, is, however, a great artist in the mechanical development of a story, and, therefore, in spite of the continued extracts from “Miss Halcombe’s diary,” and “Walter Hartright’s journal,” and “Miss Michelson’s narrative,” “The Woman in White,” holds the reader in breathless suspense, and we venture to say that the thousands might be multiplied by many tens who, week after week, and month after month, feel it one of their pressing anxieties to know through what new tribulations Mr. Wilkie Collins’s imaginary heroines will have to pass. In other articles in All the Year Round too much of the mannerism which characterized the papers in Household Words is apparent. Mr. Dickens’s own papers “The Journeys of the Uncommercial Traveller,” are interesting enough, but the imitation of Mr Dickens’s style in the same periodical are often sadly dull and wearisome.

      "Literature." Hull Packet and East Riding Times [Hull, England] 4 May 1860: n.p. 19th Century British Newspapers. 7 Apr. 2015.

    1. Why rock the boat?

      Cliff's notes: The boat is too small and it is leaking.

    2. It’s become a truism that to compose an academic text is to participate in an active and ongoing conversation

      Kenneth Burke's metaphor of the 'unending conversation' of scholarship is a touchstone reference for many writers:

      Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress.

      Burke, Kenneth. Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action. Louisiana State University Press, 1941, pp. 110-111.

    3. Surely, this is the sort of person who unleashes his work into the world only when the forces of his genius have wrought something polished, whole, and final.

      Google image search provides anecdotal support for this point.

      Typing "scholar" into a Google search brings back a series of images of male scholars who are the only people in the frame.

      Note: I conducted this search in an incognito browser to lessen the likelihood that my previous search history would shape my present search results.

      Link to enlarged image. [Opens in new window.]

  6. Mar 2019
    1. As publishing giant Cengage itself boasts in its March 2018 report to shareholders, “In contrast to print publications, our digital products cannot be resold or transferred. We therefore realize revenue from every end user” (“Annual Report” 6). 

      Predictably, Cengage's 2018 Annual Report also assures stockholders that it has a plan to increase profits in this area:

      We plan to continue to aggressively invest in the growth of our digital products and platforms while increasingly focusing and incentivizing our Go-To-Market team in this area" (6).

    2. Commentators were quick to notice that Elsevier’s description places emphasis on the “business” and the “customer;” the “commercial goals” of the publisher and the importance of “compliance,” “upward reporting,” “extracting data, and “deliverables.” Likewise—in this listing, at least—being “viewed as an organization which supports OA” appears to take priority over actually supporting OA.

      Just for fun: If we use the Voyant Word Cloud Visualizer tool to examine the Elsevier Open Access job posting, we can see the most common words in the listing (pictured here):

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/undissertating19c/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=10" width="959" height="840" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

      Topping the list: OA (8 occurrences), policy (8), team (7), access (6), analysis (6), business (6), identify (5), management (5), strategy (5), and support (5).

    3. open-access publications

      George Cham, the author/illustrator behind PhD Comics, created a visual explainer video that unpacks the rationale behind open access:

      <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L5rVH1KGBCY" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    4. in a 2019 UC-Berkeley news bulletin about the decision not to sign a new contract, Librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason informed the community that during renegotiations, the university had expressed an interest in reducing their Elsevier subscription fees, which were by this point “25 percent of UC system-wide journal costs” (Kell).

      If you'd like a bigger picture of the University of California System's other publisher relationships, economics professor Ted Bergstrom has requested and hosted these contracts on his journal-tracking website:

    5. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the consumer price index for college textbooks increased by 88% between 2006 and 2016.

      Many thanks to Steel Wagstaff for sharing this resource with me.

      To see a tiny, interactive version of this chart, click the "More" option at the bottom of this marginal annotation and scroll down in the iframe below.

      To view the Bureau of Labor Statistics' interactive chart in full-screen mode, visit the live or permalink version of the 2016 report "College tuition and fees increase 63 percent since January 2006."

      To learn more about the data displayed, see "How BLS Measures Price Change for College Tuition and Fees in the Consumer Price Index."

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/undissertating19c/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=8" width="958" height="1096" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

    1. flexible policy frameworks

      'Morally flexible policy frameworks,' perhaps?

      Because here's what happened when the UC system tried to negotiate open publishing agreements for its scholars within a new contract. First, they gave UC librarians an astronomically high price for open access publishing. University Librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason writes:

      We also wanted a contract that integrated a paid subscription with open access publishing fees. It would have been a transformative agreement, one that would shift payments for reading journal articles into payments for publishing them, and publishing them open access.

      Elsevier eventually offered to do something like what we wanted, for open access, but they wanted to charge us a lot more. Our current calculations are that they would have increased the amount of our payments by 80 percent — an additional $30 million over a three-year contract.

      Next, Elsevier tried to manipulate members of the UC community to see them as team players.

      Elsevier made a new, quite complex, but novel proposal to us at the end of January. On Monday, our negotiating team gave them a written response outlining our appreciation for Elsevier’s effort, but saying that conditions had to be met for us to sign a contract, and that we thought we were pretty far apart. We knew if they couldn’t accommodate us, there was not much point in continuing to negotiate at this time.

      Elsevier wanted to keep meeting with us, and we have a meeting scheduled for tomorrow (Friday), but yesterday they approached our faculty directly — faculty who are editors of Elsevier journals, who they have working relationships with — and also the media, and presented a rosy view of the offer they’d made to us. Their characterization of the offer left things out, and they didn’t mention what we’d proposed as conditions. They went public with it. So, we announced the end.

      Best not to repeat that strategy, I'd say.

    2. especially on compliance topics;

      There's a lot of focus here on compliance and monitoring, isn't there...

    3. • Plan and build excel models to better understand key business issues

      Heather Morrison does a nice job of putting this into context:

      It appears as though the tendency towards aggregation by both publishers and libraries is converging towards open access. If all of the works of a publisher, the “big deal” are available to researchers at every university in a country, this may seem similar to open access, and occasionally people will refer to this as open access.

      Elsevier (2011) even has a term for this: universal access. The basic idea is that if everyone who can afford to subscribe or pay–per–view to Elsevier’s resources does, and this is supplemented by a little bit of charitable access, then everyone has access. On the surface, this sounds plausible, at many libraries, the online environment has meant greatly expanded access. Many a small library has greatly expanded their journal offerings in the online environment.

      The major problem with this is who owns the information. Elsevier is a corporation, an organization with a mission of maximizing profits to shareholders. As long as Elsevier continues a policy of full copyright transfer by authors, Elsevier is free to define the payment terms of its universal access. That is, everyone can have access — provided that they are willing to pay on Elsevier’s terms. Or, Elsevier could abandon this approach altogether in favor of another seen as more profitable. If Elsevier is generally selling site wide licenses to libraries rather than pay–per–view, it is much more likely because this is how Elsevier reaps the most financial benefit, not because pay–per–view is less compatible with universal access. In 2010 Elsevier made £724m (US$1.1 billion) on revenues of £2 billion (as reported repeatedly in the Economist [8). What if a wealthy country or group of countries (or even a group of oligarchs) were to offer Elsevier £3 billion annually to provide them with exclusive access to the works owned by Elsevier?

      MORRISON, Heather. Economics of scholarly communication in transition. First Monday, [S.l.], may 2013. ISSN 13960466. Available at: https://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/4370/3685. Date accessed: 03 mar. 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v18i6.4370.

    4. - Perform insightful analysis and reporting on OA topics.

      Can we get a "such as?"

  7. Feb 2019
    1. No. 2

      Link to the Voyant "distant reading" tools for WIW No. 2.

      Image: Voyant Visualizer Wordcloud

    2. 3 December 1859

      Link to the Voyant "distant reading" tools for WIW No. 2.

      Image: Voyant Visualizer Wordcloud

    3. easy, unaffected self-reliance

      A "barnacle": Speaking from a 21st-century perspective, I love that Marian is allowed to be a competent woman who doesn't fulfill Walter's idea of feminine beauty.

      Walter, however, is very conflicted about her appearance and 'masculinity' in this scene. How does his reaction affect the way you view him as a character?

    1. His minimalist Javascript game “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition” recalls several of the punishments meted out to figures in Greek storytelling by inviting players to interact with digital dialog boxes.

      Iframe Embed of Pippin Barr's Javascript game “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition.”

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=14" width="919" height="943" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

      Barr, Pippin. “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition,” GitHub, 2019. Permalink.

    2. His minimalist Javascript game “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition” recalls several of the punishments meted out to figures in Greek storytelling by inviting players to interact with digital dialog boxes.

      Iframe Embed of Pippin Barr's Javascript game “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition.”

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=14" width="919" height="943" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

      Barr, Pippin. “Let’s Play Ancient Greek Punishment: UI Edition,” GitHub, 2019. Permalink.

    1. Open-Access Efforts

      George Cham, the author/illustrator behind PhD Comics, created a visual explainer video that unpacks the rationale behind open access: <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L5rVH1KGBCY" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    1. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson.

      In addition to co-authoring multiple texts on the subject, Mackey and Jacobson describe their development of this concept as well as their own experiences teaching with it in a 2018 Tea for Teaching podcast interview, which is freely accessible online. (Tea for Teaching interview transcript permalink.)

    2. Ideally, an open pedagogy project explicitly welcomes future participation and adaptation (Robbins, “Guidelines”).

      Timothy Robbins emphasizes this goal in his guidelines for contributors to the latest Rebus Community iteration of the Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature. In a distillation I find particularly elegant, he notes: "In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge" ("Guidelines: Section Introductions.") 

    3. Specialty areas that present a more level playing field for others to access the primary and secondary sources at the heart of our conversations have the potential to be more inclusive than others.[17]

      Jeff Spies of the Center for Open Science provides an anecdote about this process at work in other fields in an interview with documentarians for the film Paywall. He notes:

      "Research efficiency comes with increases in quality, increases in inclusivity, increases in diversity, increases in innovation. . . . I had a visit to the University of Belgrade a few years ago, and I was meeting with grad students before my lecture, and we were going around the room talking about what each researcher did and were working on for their thesis. And almost everyone in the room was working on implicit cognition. And it was amazing that there were so many students working on this particular area of research, and so I said, 'Why are all of you doing this? How has that become this be the area that's so popular?' And the immediate response was, 'Well, we can access the literature in this area.' 'What do you mean?' I said. 'Well, there is a norm of all the leading researchers in your field: all of you put your papers online. So, we can find them and we can know what’s going on right now in this literature that we can’t get access to in other sub-disciplines.' I was blown away by that, right? That they made some decisions about what to study based on what they could access (Paywall 00:16:19 - 00:17:54)

    4. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson

      In addition to co-authoring multiple texts on the subject, Mackey and Jacobson describe their development of this concept as well as their own experiences teaching with it in a 2018

      Tea for Teaching podcast interview, which is freely accessible online. (Tea for Teaching interview transcript permalink.)

    5. separate public domain illustrations

      The main source images for this collage:

      Borrow, George Henry, and E. J. Sullivan. "I did not like reviewing at all--it was not to my taste." Lavengro, Macmillan and Co., London, 1896, p. 296. British Library Flickr, HMNTS 012621.h.20. Accessed 1 February 2018.

      Dodge, Mary Elizabeth. "A Terrible Tiger." When Life is Young: a Collection of Verse for Boys and Girls, Century Co., 1894, New York, p. 201. British Library Flickr. Accessed 1 February 2018.

    6. Fields that present a more level playing field for others to access the primary and secondary sources at the heart of our conversations have the potential to be more inclusive than others.

      Jeff Spies of the Center for Open Science provides an anecdote about this process at work in other fields in an interview with documentarians for the film Paywall. He notes:

      "Research efficiency comes with increases in quality increases in inclusivity, increases in diversity, increases in innovation. . . . I had a visit to the University of Belgrade a few years ago, and I was meeting with grad students before my lecture, and we were going around the room talking about what each researcher did and were working on for their thesis. And almost everyone in the room was working on implicit cognition. And it was amazing that there were so many students working on this particular area of research, and so I said, 'Why are all of you doing this? How has that become this be the area that's so popular?' And the immediate response was, 'Well, we can access the literature in this area.' 'What do you mean?' I said. 'Well, there is a norm of all the leading researchers in your field: all of you put your papers online. So, we can find them and we can know what’s going on right now in this literature that we can’t get access to in other sub-disciplines.' I was blown away by that, right? That they made some decisions about what to study based on what they could access (Paywall 00:16:19 - 00:17:54)

    7. two separate public domain illustrations

      The main source images for this collage:

      and

      Borrow, George Henry, and E. J. Sullivan. "I did not like reviewing at all--it was not to my taste." Lavengro, Macmillan and Co., London, 1896, p. 296. British Library Flickr, HMNTS 012621.h.20. Accessed 1 February 2018.

      Dodge, Mary Elizabeth. "A Terrible Tiger." When Life is Young: a Collection of Verse for Boys and Girls, Century Co., 1894, New York, p. 201. British Library Flickr. Accessed 1 February 2018.

    8. it is also the process of designing architectures and using tools for learning that enable students to shape the public knowledge commons of which they are a part

      Rajiv Jhangiani connects this point both to the 2008 Cape Town Open Education Declaration's outline of open pedagogy and to UNESCO's UNESCO’s Education for Sustainable Development Goals (or ESD), which he excerpts in more detail in his presentation:

      “ESD does not only integrate contents such as climate change, poverty and sustainable consumption into the curriculum… It asks for an action-oriented, transformative pedagogy, which supports self-directed learning, participation and collaboration, problem-orientation, inter- and transdisciplinarity and the linking of formal and informal learning. Only such pedagogical approaches make possible the development of the key competencies needed for promoting sustainable development.”

      Jhangiani, Rajiv. "Open Educational Practices in Services of the Sustainable Development Goals." Open Con, United Nations Headquarters, New York, 2018. Recording and transcript; Permalink.

    9. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson

      In addition to co-authoring multiple texts on the subject, Mackey and Jacobson describe their development of this concept as well as their own experiences teaching with it in a 2018 Tea for Teaching podcast interview, which is freely accessible online. (Tea for Teaching interview permalink).

  8. Jan 2019
    1. but still it was the sort of dress which the wife or daughter of a poor man might have worn; and it made the heiress of Limmeridge House,

      A "Serial to Volume Edition Comparison" point of interest:

      In the first volume edition of this text, Collins removes the phrase "the heiress of Limmeridge House" in this sentence.

      The volume edition thus reads, "it made her, so far as externals went, look less affluent in circumstances than her own governess."

      This change ties into other alterations in the volume edition that reduce the text's emphasis on Laura's status as a wealthy heiress.

      What are your thoughts on this change? Do you see any other volume-edition alterations that seem to have a similar effect?

      Direct link to instance in 1860 Vol. 1

    1. For example, this note should appear highlighted in yellow. Try clicking on it!

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      Please try clicking the carat and selecting the "Public" option that will appear in the dropdown.

      Preview:

    2. Try clicking on it!

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      Instead, create a private group and teach your class how to comment and reply within it!

  9. Nov 2018
    1. What are two things you can do to contribute to an inclusive classroom environment?

      Sample student response: I know that I can be uncomfortable when there is silence in the classroom and sometimes raise my hand to fill it right away. But some people like to think about what they want to say before they speak and need a couple of seconds of silence to do so. One thing I can do to make sure everyone participates is to make sure I'm leaving enough space for other people to share their ideas.

    2. listening carefully

      Sample student response: I had to give a big presentation last year and it meant a lot to me that my friends all looked at me and nodded to show me they cared about what I had to say. Participation can mean making eye contact with other who are talking even if you don't talk a lot.

    1. How do you feel about writing in books?

      Open Questions:

      1. What is your approach to leaving marks in the books you own?
      2. Is your approach any different when you're interacting with library books or other shared volumes?
      3. Do you ever type out notes to yourself when using e-readers or interacting with a digital pdf?

      Feel free to share your response to one or more of these questions by clicking the arrow button at the bottom right-hand side of this annotation.

    1. easy, unaffected self-reliance

      A "barnacle": Speaking from a 21st-century perspective, I love that Marian is allowed to be a competent woman who doesn't fulfill Walter's idea of feminine beauty.

      Walter, however, is very conflicted about her appearance and 'masculinity' in this scene. How does his reaction affect the way you view him as a character?

      (Feel free to respond by clicking the arrow-shaped "Reply" button at the bottom of this note!)

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    1. Et nous alimentons nos aimables remords, Comme les mendiants nourrissent leur vermine.

      Exercice 1 (un autre exercice suit sous l'image)

      <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="227" src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/oersourcebook/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=9" width="959"></iframe><script charset="UTF-8" src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/oersourcebook/wp-content/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js"></script>

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  10. Oct 2018
    1. Be Aware of Your Resources—By being aware of what resources are available to you—both within your team and on campus—you can save a considerable amount of time planning and developing sections. Your Team: Fellow TAs—This is the first and foremost resource you can utilize in your teaching practice. Your fellow TAs can cover a section for you if you need to miss one and they can help you work with difficult or unresponsive sections.Supervisor—Your supervisor has a wealth of experience from which you can draw. Moreover, they were part of planning the course and are the best resource when it comes to finding answers to questions like, “why is this reading relevant?” They are also the best person to go to if you have a problem with a students or one of your fellow TAs.Department—The members of your department—faculty, fellow grads, and staff—can be a vital resource. Whether it’s getting PowerPoints or notes from a graduate student who previously taught the same course or booking an alternative exam room with the staff, utilizing your department can making the teaching experience less challenging.Students—Listening to your students’ suggestions on what is working and what is not can help you to alter the course in a way that makes it accessible to everyone. If you are having trouble getting vocalized feedback you can provide an anonymous evaluation a few weeks into term asking student to clarify things they like and do not like about the discussion sections so far.

      This information may be useful to excerpt. Some of the information above may be already covered elsewhere

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      via GIPHY

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      Hello there!

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      Hello there!