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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Apr 2021
    1. Probably the only thing I'd like to see fixed now is the possibility of quick restart like in the old Timberman and not having to wait for the 'Game Over' screen to finally be back to the good ol' choppin'
    1. Work-life balance However, I recently understood that while we were working on the game, I broke the one and only rule I set for the founders of the company: always family first. My wife was expecting our second child and I was working long days at the office, and I became obsessed with making sure the game is as good as possible. The same probably applies to everyone in the team, since we shared love and passion for the franchise.
    1. It's as good as online-only, however with noone actually playing you'll find yourself queueing for bot matches (even having to wait for the "other players" to select their vehicles). You want to just race your mate in a local game- nope! Local races are single-player only (apparently the devs couldn't be bothered with coding a split-screen or zooming camera to enable local multiplayer races). Want to play online but specify the map? Nope! Play a game online with a good lobby and want to stick with that group? Nope! Every game forces you to exit after each event.
    1. Firstly, I don't like being thrown back into the menu every single time I fail a challenge, I prefer to be thrown right back in to it, maybe a "retry" option should be there to throw you right back in once you fail a challenge.
    1. What a convenient little elision for the Valley, the seat of real power. They’re not the repressive force; opposing them is. All they want is to let us be as free as when we were kids.

    1. Humans can easily digest and excrete methylxanthines, the half life of theobromine being 2-3 hours.

      That is absurdly shorter than other citations. It is almost certainly wrong.

    1. There has been some Quality-of-Life changes as well, which I really appreciate. For example, the long elevator in level 10 has been replaced with a teleporter. There's been some balance changes as well, but aside from level 10, I haven't checked them out.
    1. the game is designed in such a way that you don't need too many tries to figure out boss patterns or tricky platforming sections. Another nice feature is that you can warp between different areas so you don't have to do a bunch of backtracking.
  3. Mar 2021
    1. A cool concept of displaying your life in story: Life in weeksI am reminded of this site, where I first encountered the ‘life in weeks’ idea.Other apps/sites that help you visualize or track your life:https://zrxj5vvjvl.codesandbox.io/https://jhornitzky.github.io/yolograph/demo/ - shows you what percentage of years you lived based on an average lifespan of 70 yearshttp://pewu.github.io/life-in-weeks/ - customizablehttps://lifecal.me/ - an apphttps://entire.life/ - a webapp?
    1. After being denied admission at three colleges

      Stuart's elementary school was Plum Grove School, where an intense love of learning was instilled in him (his father also instilled this love of learning in him) https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_olink/r/1501/10?clear=10&p10_accession_num=bgsu1554464085296459.

    1. But a city’s most famous restaurants aren’t always its most important, just as the giant panda isn’t necessarily the species most crucial to the health of its habitat. If this distinction wasn’t already obvious, it has been made clear over the past year. Some of New York’s most avidly followed kitchens have been dark for most or all of the pandemic, including the Grill, Atomix, Per Se, Balthazar and Le Coucou.

      To give equal credit to the less "important restaurants" as the one he may be writing this article about, he refers back to more animals, such as a giant panda, which is not important to the ecosystem but is well-known. He gives examples of how famous restaurants have been idle as well, granting a light to the lesser known restaurants which are still important to the New York ecosystem. This metaphor sets up the article in a perspective that is easily understood by readers.

  4. Feb 2021
    1. You’re a science and data-driven person. You’re obsessed with physics, engineering, with figuring out how things work. So apply that same passion for science not just to your products but to yourself. People are not machines. For machines — whether of the First or Fourth Industrial Revolution variety — downtime is a bug; for humans, downtime is a feature. The science is clear. And what it tells us is that there’s simply no way you can make good decisions and achieve your world-changing ambitions while running on empty. To cite just one study, after 17-19 hours without sleep, we begin to experience levels of cognitive impairment equivalent to a blood alcohol level of .05 percent, just under the threshold for being legally drunk. No business leader would hire people who came to work drunk, so don’t model that behavior for your employees.
    1. Building a “30 by 30” list, however, is a misbegotten approach to happiness. Not that anyone in our material- and achievement-oriented society could be faulted for thinking this way, of course. Every cultural message we get is that happiness can be read off a scorecard of money, education, experiences, relationships, and prestige. Want the happiest life? Check the boxes of success and adventure, and do it as early as possible! Then move on to the next set of boxes. She who dies with the most checked boxes wins, right?More in this seriesThe Type of Love That Makes People HappiestArthur C. BrooksThe Subtle Mindset Shift That Could Radically Change the Way You See the WorldArthur C. BrooksThere Are Two Kinds of Happy PeopleArthur C. Brooks Wrong. I don’t mean that accomplishment and ambition are bad, but that they are simply not the drivers of our happiness. By the time many people figure this out on their own, they have spent a lifetime checking things off lists, yet are unhappy and don’t know why.The economist Joseph Schumpeter once wrote that entrepreneurs love to earn fortunes “as an index of success and as a symptom of victory.” That is, every million or billion is another box checked to provide an entrepreneur with a feeling of self-worth and success.
  5. Jan 2021
    1. Crux -

      1. Calm plants the seeds of crazy. And also crazy plants the seeds of calm. Basically when times are good, we indulge in it, become complacent about our achievements, become skeptic of the warnings ahead. So, when something bad hits, it's a shock. Similarly crazy plants the seeds of calm, when we are going through a societal shock, we come up with revolutionary solutions, that can help to bring calm for the years to come.
      2. Progress requires optimism and pessimism. Shoot for the stars aim for the moon. Be prepared for the worst, give your best.
      3. People believe what they want to believe, see what they want to see, and hear what they want to hear. Either the model of how I think is wrong, or the other person is wrong. And it is often the latter that people go with, since it is the path of least resistance, both to make changes yourself, and as well as your image.
      4. Important things rarely have one cause
      5. Risk is what you don't see
  6. Dec 2020
    1. In the second idea, German chemist Manfred Eigen described what he called a “hypercycle,” in which several autocatalytic sets combine to form a single larger one. Eigen’s variant introduces a crucial distinction: In a hypercycle, some of the chemicals are genes and are therefore made of DNA or some other nucleic acid, while others are proteins that are made-to-order based on the information in the genes. This system could evolve based on changes—mutations—in the genes, a function that Kauffman’s model lacked.
    2. In 1971 Gánti tackled the problem head-on in a new book, Az Élet Princípiuma, or The Principles of Life. Published only in Hungarian, this book contained the first version of his chemoton model, which described what he saw as the fundamental unit of life. However, this early model of the organism was incomplete, and it would take him another three years to publish what is now regarded as the definitive version—again only in Hungarian, in a paper that is not available online.
    3. In 1966 he published a book on molecular biology called Forradalom az Élet Kutatásában, or Revolution in Life Research, a dominant university textbook for years—partly because few others were available. The book asked whether science understood how life was organized, and concluded that it did not.
    4. That’s because he devised a model of the simplest possible living organism, which he called the chemoton, that points to an exciting explanation for how life on Earth began.

      Tibor Gánti

  7. Nov 2020
    1. Since I closed down the Dish, my bloggy website, five years ago, after 15 years of daily blogging, I have not missed the insane work hours that all but broke my health.
    1. but know I know what I don't want to do. I definitely know I want to be an Engineer now, and it makes it more clear that I should start my own business.
    1. Manolis Kellis: Origin of Life, Humans, Ideas, Suffering, and Happiness | Lex Fridman Podcast #123

      My summary:

      Biology:

      • Life = energy + self preservation
      • Neanderthals could be the reason why wolves/dogs are living closely with humans. Maybe in the past generations, dogs had no choice but to live with humans as they were scared of our power?
      • People evolved from the deep ocean (we're made in 70% of water). We're like transporting the sea with us now
      • Dolphins as mammals came back into the water
      • RNA invented proteins. Later RNA and proteins created DNA
      • Life is like any kind of self-reinforcement such as self-reinforcement of RNA molecules which lead to the evolution process
      • Europa (moon of Jupiter) already evolves some non-DNA life there. Life could exist in its under-ice ocean, perhaps in an environment similar to Earth's deep-ocean hydrothermal vents. It will be fascinating to get to know it

      Life:

      • Don't focus on goals but have a path to prevent the "rat race" sort of feeling
      • Almost every Hollywood movie has a happy ending. It prepares us, humans, really poorly for the bad times in life We need to read/watch more stories with a bad ending
      • Life is about accomplishing things, not about being happy all the time
      • As a parent, don't ask your kid if he's happy but what he's struggling to achieve
      • Most likely, we live on the best planet during the best time as the most beautiful mammals
      • If you understand yourself, you won't seek self-assurance in what other people think of you
      • It's hard to get to know your true self if you live all the time in the same location/environment and have the same friends who would like to have a stable image of you
    1. anything that makes you lighter helps create the balance which keeps you going.

      "In order to balance I never left anything pending on my to-do-list for tomorrow. If I did, I worked on break shift from home post putting her off to sleep. This was possible because I could manage my office on laptop. To release the pressure points I tore papers, took cold water bath in the middle of the night, laid on the floor in child pose." Monica Suri

  8. Oct 2020
    1. Work is where you spend the majority of your waking hours

      A week has 168 hours, if you sleep 56 hours a week, and work 40, and commute 10, you still get 62 hours if your wake time for something else. How you spend them is up to you.

    1. Lifelong learning: Formal, non‐formal and informal learning in the context of the use of problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments 

      Nygren, H., Nissinen, K., Hämäläinen, R., & Wever, B. (2019). Lifelong learning: Formal, non‐formal and informal learning in the context of the use of problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments. British Journal of Educational Technology, 50(4), 1759–1770. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12807

      The evolving technological landscape in the digital era has a crucial influence on lifelong learning and the demand for problem‐solving skills. In this paper, we identify associations between formal, non‐formal and informal learning with sufficient problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments (TRE). We focus on adults' problem‐solving skills in TRE as a novel approach to investigate formal, non‐formal and informal learning based on data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. This programme measured 16–64‐year‐old adults' proficiency in problem‐solving skills in TRE. The total sample size was 61 654 individuals from 13 European countries. Our results clearly indicate that the skill levels of more than 50% of adults aged 16–64 years old seem to be insufficient to cope effectively in TRE. The findings suggest that the learning ecologies of adults are a combination of formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities. The overall level of problem‐solving skills in TRE was higher among individuals who indicated that they have participated either formal or non‐formal learning activities, compared to those who have not. However, interestingly, the association between formal learning and problem‐solving skills in TRE was not major. Instead, our results clearly indicate that informal learning seems to be highly associated with sufficient problem‐solving skills in TRE. In practice, we outline those formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities that adults perform when applying the skills in TRE. By recognising these activities undertaken by sufficient problem solvers, we can promote lifelong learning skills. Our findings can also be used as a starting point for future studies on lifelong learning.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=tfh&AN=138139297&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

    1. they found that the glyoxylate and pyruvate reacted to make a range of compounds that included chemical analogues to all the intermediary products in the TCA cycle except for citric acid. Moreover, these products all formed in water within a single reaction vessel, at temperatures and pH conditions mild enough to be compatible with conditions on Earth.
    1. In the meantime, the classification of viruses remains unclear. Tupanviruses seem to be dependent on their hosts for very little, and other viruses, according to one preprint, even encode ribosomal proteins. “The gap between cellular organisms and viruses is starting to close,” Deeg said.

      Is there a graph of known viruses categoriezed by the machinery that they do or don't have? Can they be classified and sub-classified so that emergent patterns come forward thus allowing us to trace back their ancestry?

    1. Chetty is also using tax data to measure the long-term impacts of dozens of place-based interventions, such as enterprise zones, which use tax and other incentives to draw businesses into economically depressed areas.

      It wasn't this particular piece of text, but roughly at about here I had the thought that these communities could be looked at as life from an input /output perspective in relation to homeostasis. Essentially they're being slowly starved out and killed in a quietly moral yet amoral way. As a result entropy is slowly killing them and also causing problems for the society around them that blames the them for their own problems. Giving them some oxygen to breathe and thrive will fix so many of the problems.

    1. The linear life is dead. Americans have been told for decades that our lives will follow predictable, linear paths interrupted by periodic “crises” on birthdays that end in zero. The backbone of this paradigm was a series of carefully calibrated progressions—from dating to marriage to children to empty nest; from low-level job to mid-level job to senior-level job to retirement. Today that idea is preposterously behind the times. We no longer expect to have just one job, one relationship, one spirituality, one sexuality, one source of happiness from adolescence to assisted living.

      Instead it is non-linear life right now, where it is all intertwined into a complex swirl of setbacks, celebrations, triumphs and rebirths.

    2. There’s no such thing as a midlife crisis. The idea of the “midlife crisis” was first articulated by a psychoanalyst named Elliott Jaques in 1957. He claimed that people in their mid-30s go through a depressive period brought on by first contemplating their mortality. Jaques didn’t do any research; he just read a bunch of biographies of famous men. He didn’t include women, he said, because menopause “obscured” their midlife transitions. When Gail Sheehy popularized the idea in the 70s, based primarily on some very iffy research by Dan Levinson at Yale (he interviewed only 40 people, and again only men), she said the midlife crisis must start in the 40th year and will end at 45 ½. This is all bunk. My research shows that we suffer a series of three to five lifequakes, as I call them, all across our lives. These could be medical issues, career shifts, change in sexual practices, as well as divorce, social movements like #MeToo or #BlackLiveMatter, or external events like a tornado, a financial crisis, a downsizing, or a pandemic. Some of these are voluntary, others are involuntary.

      Also, the latest research points at these lifequakes lasting on an average for about five years.

    1. Where the provisioning trade predominated, black men worked as stock minders and herdsmen while black women labored as dairy maids as well as do- mestics of various kinds.

      Slaves in the North were living in better life than the Southern slaves.

  9. Sep 2020
    1. Land Life Company- At a time when the world is submerging in the ill-effects of climate change and deforestation, Land Life Company offers a simple, sustainable, and highly scalable option to deal with the situation.

    1. This study focuses on higher education instructors in the Global South, concentrating on those located in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. Based on a survey of 295 instructors at 28 higher education institutions (HEIs) in nine countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia; Ghana, Kenya, South Africa; India, Indonesia, Malaysia), this research seeks to establish a baseline set of data for assessing OER use in these regions while attending to how such activity is differentiated across continental areas and associated countries. This is done by examining which variables – such as gender, age, technological access, digital literacy, etc. – seem to influence OER use rates, thereby allowing us to gauge which are the most important for instructors in their respective contexts.The two research questions that drive this study are:1. What proportion of instructors in the Global South have ever used OER?2. Which variables may account for different OER usage rates between respondents in the Global South?

      Survey, assessment, data and research analysis of OER use and impact in the global south