15 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. Jan 2019
    1. Lewontin’s fallacy

      For the article to name this fallacy and thoroughly debunk it, see Edwards, A. W. F. (2003). Human genetic diversity: Lewontin's fallacy. BioEssays, 25, 798-801. doi:10.1002/bies.10315

    2. In recent years, the evidence that genes are at least a partial influence of every human behavior and psychological trait has mounted so quickly that the early 21st century may be the dawn of a behavioral genetics revolution in psychology. Such a revolution may be as important—or more important—for psychology than the cognitive revolution was in the mid-20th century.

      This is one of the most important quotes in the article. Check with me in 30 years to see if my coauthors and I are correct.

  3. Dec 2018
    1. Girls, even when their abilities in science equaled or excelled that of boys, often were likely to be better overall in reading comprehension

      What does this say about different skill sets? Is this biological or genetic, or is it just conditioned?

  4. Sep 2018
    1. euromuscular disease is a general term thatencompasses a variety of acquired or geneti-cally inherited diseases that can affect the mus-cle and peripheral nerves, generally causingmuscle weakness (

      genetic influences

    2. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the foremost genetic cause of infant mortality.

      Talk to authors about recent developments.

    1. One explanation has been that many of an animal's traits are not fixed, but can change during its lifetime. This "phenotypic plasticity" enables individual animals to alter their appearance or behavior enough to survive in a new environment. Eventually, new adaptations promoting survival arise in the population through genetic changes and natural selection, which acts on the population over generations. This is known as the "Baldwin effect" after the psychologist James Mark Baldwin, who presented the idea in a landmark paper published in 1896.
  5. Jun 2018
  6. Mar 2018
    1. If scientists can be confident of anything, it is that whatever we currently believe about the genetic nature of differences among populations is most likely wrong. For example, my laboratory discovered in 2016, based on our sequencing of ancient human genomes, that “whites” are not derived from a population that existed from time immemorial, as some people believe. Instead, “whites” represent a mixture of four ancient populations that lived 10,000 years ago and were each as different from one another as Europeans and East Asians are today.

      I'd like to see that study. This article.

    2. Beginning in 1972, genetic findings began to be incorporated into this argument. That year, the geneticist Richard Lewontin published an important study of variation in protein types in blood. He grouped the human populations he analyzed into seven “races” — West Eurasians, Africans, East Asians, South Asians, Native Americans, Oceanians and Australians — and found that around 85 percent of variation in the protein types could be accounted for by variation within populations and “races,” and only 15 percent by variation across them. To the extent that there was variation among humans, he concluded, most of it was because of “differences between individuals.”In this way, a consensus was established that among human populations there are no differences large enough to support the concept of “biological race.” Instead, it was argued, race is a “social construct,” a way of categorizing people that changes over time and across countries.It is true that race is a social construct. It is also true, as Dr. Lewontin wrote, that human populations “are remarkably similar to each other” from a genetic point of view.

      The Lewontin blood protein argument against race as a biological phenomenon.

  7. Nov 2017
  8. Oct 2017
  9. Sep 2017
  10. Sep 2016
    1. Module 1: Quantitative Genetics

      Interesting module, introduces the base concepts needed to conduct the project, for instance the analysis of complex characters where both genetic and environment factors contribute to trait variation.

      Details annotated: https://via.hypothes.is/http://cnsgenomics.com/sisg/Module1.html