18 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
  2. Jun 2022
    1. Perhaps one of the most important questions to be asked is “What are we not ‘seeing’?.” … “A collaborative project of the late botanists Erwin Lichtenegger and Lore Kutschera celebrates the power and beauty of these otherwise hidden systems through detailed drawings of agricultural crops, shrubs, trees, and weeds. Digitized by the Wageningen University & Research, the extensive archive is the culmination of 40 years of research in Austria that involved cultivating and carefully retrieving developed plant life from the soil for study. It now boasts more than 1,000 renderings of the winding, spindly roots, some of which branch multiple feet wide.”

      These drawings are metaphors for the human meaningverse of an individual and the visible and invisible aspects of our ideas that we present to the rest of the world.

      What is of greatest meaning lives in the individual's salience landscape. That salience landscape is the result of a lifetime of sense-making - all the books we've ever read, talks or presentations we've ever listened to, conversations we've had, courses we've studied. While the other person may have an idea of what is important to us, they are clueless of how that salience landscape came to be.

      This vast network of formative events is usually invisible to the OTHER.

      The public, open source Indyweb that is currently being designed will allow the individual user for the first time to consolidate all his or her digital learning in one place, the user's owned Indyhub. Since Indyweb also has built-in provenance, it will allow traceability of public ideas. This allows the individual to keep track of what would otherwise by invisible and lost - the history of his/her social interaction with ideas.

  3. Feb 2022
  4. inst-fs-iad-prod.inscloudgate.net inst-fs-iad-prod.inscloudgate.net
    1. This day on which Enkidu dreamed came to an end and be lay stricken with sickness. One whole day he lay on his bed and his suffering increased. He said to Gilgamesh, the friend on whose account he had left the wilderness, 'Once I ran for you, for the water of life, and I now have nothing:' A second day he lay on his bed and Gilgamesh watched over him but the sickness increased. A third day he lay on his bed, he called out to Gilgamesh, rousing him up. Now he was weak and his eyes were blind with weeping. Ten days he lay and his suffering increased, eleven and twelve days he lay on his bed of pain. Then he called to Gilgamesh, 'My friend, the great goddess cursed me and I must die in shame. I shall not die like a man fallen in battle; I feared to fall, but happy is the man who falls in the battle, for I must die in shame.' And Gilgamesh wept over Enkidu. With the first light of dawn he raised his voice and said to the counsellors of Uruk

      The numbered days of death and 3 (Jesus was on the cross for three days) and the innocence of Enkidu by being betrayed are quite a bit like the crucifixion.

    2. umbaba said, 'Enkidu, what you have spoken is evil: you, a hireling, dependent for your bread! In envy and for fear of a rival you have spoken evil words.' Enkidu said, ‘Do not listen, Gilgamesh: this Humbaba must die. Kill Humbaba first and his servants after

      Humbaba reminds me a lot of Goliath, and since he tried to trick Enkidu, maybe cunning like the devil.

    3. he heavens roared and the earth roared again, daylight failed and darkness fell, lightnings flashed, fire blazed out, the clouds lowered, they rained down death. Then the brightness departed, the fire went out, and all was turned to ashes fallen about us. Let us go down from the mountain and talk this over, and consider what we should do

      I thought this might be an early representation of the devil or evil, with horns and fire. Although it could have contributed to later representations of the devil or hell, it might have just showed how great a deed the two did in killing Humbaba. The scale of what they did might have made an impact in how greatly they were seen though in the descriptions of Uruk at the beginning of the story, so maybe it starts to show the impact of one or two people, like some kind of savior?

    4. ough, he had long hair like a woman's; it waved like the hair of Nisaba, the goddess of corn. His body was covered with matted hair like Samugan's, the god of cattle. He was innocent of mankind; he knew nothing of the cultivated land. Enkidu ate grass in the hills with the gazelle and lurked with wild beasts at the water-holes; he had joy of the water with the herds of wild game. But there was a trapper who met him one day face to face at the drinking-hole,

      This reminded us of the backgrounds between Jesus and John the Baptist. Although the relationship is different, the two are also very close and one is god-like and the other is rough and feral. The fact that Enkidu's hair was described in so much detail also reminded me a little of Samson in that it was so important.

  5. Oct 2021
    1. To date, there is no single accounting of how much money flowed from the slave economy into coffers of American higher education. But Wilder says most American colleges founded before the Civil War relied on money derived from slavery. He suspects that many institutions are reluctant to examine this past. "There's not a lot of upside for them. You know these aren't great fundraising stories," Wilder says. Some people say that institutions must do more than make apologies and rename buildings. They insist that scholarships and other forms of monetary reparations are due. And others argue that whatever colleges and universities are doing to acknowledge their slave-holding past — a campus memorial to slaves, for example — is motivated by public relations and does nothing to ameliorate the legacy of slavery and systemic inequality. Brown University was the first to confront its ties to slavery in a major way. In 2003, Brown president Ruth Simmons appointed a commission to investigate. "What better way to teach our students about ethical conduct than to show ourselves to be open to the truth, and to tell the full story?" she says.

      This is important research to do so as not to conveniently forget the past. If all were equal today, that would have happened as the proper outcome of proactive, widespread and impactful recognition of the injustice of the past. Inequality has persisted, transmuted into structural inequality, especially manifesting in economic legacy of inherited wealth. It could be interpreted as unconducive for fundraising, but so can opaqueness of a proactive strategy.

  6. Jul 2021
    1. Sergio: What about school?Rodolfo: School? One of the first memories I have from school, after Phoenix—I wasn't going to school in Phoenix, actually, I think I even skipped kindergarten—we moved to Long Beach, California. And the only thing I remember from school was my mom waking me up probably about four or five in the morning. The sun wasn't even out yet, and she would walk me to this random lady's house. Actually, she wasn't random, but she was just some lady I didn't know. There was two other kids there, and I would be in uniform. That was the first time I actually wore a uniform to go to school. I was there, but I didn't really remember that much. When we moved to Chicago, that's when everything changed.Rodolfo: I was a little bit older. I remember I went to Jordan Elementary. It was in the North side of Chicago. We were there for a very brief moment, because then we moved to Evanston. Evanston was literally right next to Chicago. The school I was attending was called Orrington Elementary. The reason why we moved, once again, is because she wanted a better quality of life for me. Where I was at, it was all English, there was no Spanish. Obviously, there were Hispanic kids who already spoke English, but there wasn't... She, herself didn't know English, so how could she teach me, so how could I be integrated into a school that doesn't even accommodate for individuals or kids who don't know English?Rodolfo: She moved schools, although we were still in Chicago because we needed... what was it? Proof of residency. We lived out of district, and she would get fined or I wouldn't be able to go to school there. The point is I went to school to Orrington Elementary. The program was called the TWI (Two Way Immersion). It was a bilingual program and that's where I learned my English, that school. Friends and everything. I feel as though like, that's why I learned my English so well, because I really, really wanted to learn it. I always heard kids at the park or at the store, at Target, at Jewels, or whatever and everybody spoke English, right? I just felt fascinated, I was intrigued by it.Rodolfo: It was a whole different language that I didn't know, and I wanted to master it. I wanted to be able to talk as they spoke, or talk as they talked. School was a very cool experience. I always had a lot of friends, and I was always the life of the classroom. I wasn't probably the best behaved kid, but I was always integrated in to what was going on with the school.Sergio: Do you remember any teachers or people?Rodolfo: Yeah, absolutely. Ms. Mule, Ms. Mule was my second or third grade teacher, I'm not sure which one it was. She was awesome, she always help me out with the English, always. Even in parent teacher conferences, she would literally always talk to my mom as if she'd be really interested. She would show genuine interest in what was going on with, not just me, but with the Hispanic kids. Kids who had trouble with English or weren't doing the best academically. She always would tell me, "Don't worry, you're gonna get it. You're gonna learn it." She had such a big heart.Rodolfo: Still even, my mother and I still talk about the teacher to this point in time. She tells me, "I remember Ms. Mule and she used to use hand gestures. She would always be like, 'Yeah, for this or for that.'" Even though I knew I wasn't the smartest or the most best behaved kid, she would always have that initiative to get us there. Get us to that point. Yeah, that was one of my favorite teachers. Man, I value that so much actually now. I miss that teacher. Another teacher was in fifth grade, his name was Mr. Stoom. He was Argentinian, he was from Argentina. He was another great teacher. He always told us, "Don't ever forget where you came from. Your roots are who you are, even though you all are coming from different parts of the world, don't ever forget who you are and where you come from." That's one of the biggest things right now, I'm kind of ashamed of.Rodolfo: I'm not, because I was so... What do they say, "Americanized." In Chicago, I was so in America. I never dedicated the time to open a book or even Google something of my home country. Now that I get here, I don't know what is going on. Just barely a couple of months ago, I found out Mexico is a third-world country. I didn't know that. I go to Polanco Fendi, Prado, Gucci, Armani, Louis Vuitton boutiques. To me, that's not a third world country. Yeah, that teacher was the one who started opening my eyes up more to my surroundings.

      Time in the US, School, Kindergarten, Elementary, Learning English/ESL, Teachers, Mentors, Cultural acceptance; Reflections, Identity, American; Time in the US, States, Arizona, California, Illinois

  7. Mar 2021
    1. Fibar bi jàngal na taawan bu góor ni ñuy dagge reeni aloom.

      Le guérisseur a appris à son fils aîné comment on coupe les racines du Diospyros.

      fibar -- (fibar bi? the healer? as in feebar / fièvre / fever? -- used as a general term for sickness).

      bi -- the (indicates nearness).

      jàngal v. -- to teach (something to someone), to learn (something from someone) -- compare with jàng (as in janga wolof) and jàngale.

      na -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      taaw+an (taaw) bi -- first child, eldest. (taawan -- his eldest).

      bu -- the (indicates relativeness).

      góor gi -- man; male.

      ni -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      ñuy -- they (?).

      dagg+e (dagg) v. -- cut; to cut.

      reen+i (reen) bi -- root, taproot, support.

      aloom gi -- Diospyros mespiliformis, EBENACEA (tree).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BryN2nVE3jY

  8. May 2019
  9. Oct 2018
  10. Aug 2017
  11. Oct 2016
    1. which contains more than 13,500 images of early American grave markers, mostly made prior to 1800.

      Day of the dead goes back more than 200 years

    2. Halloween, the celebration conflates the Catholic holidays with an Aztec festival dedicated to a goddess called Mictecacihuatl, the “Lady of the Dead.”

      Catholic and aztec roots

    1. In the mountains, there you feel free.

      Interesting, because a snowy mountain is also a fairly desolate place (dead trees/plants, deadly stillness or harsh wind, untouched landscape, etc), but it is seen as beautiful instead of distasteful like the wasteland that Eliot describes.

    2. dried tubers.

      Merely surviving on the little bits of life that still exist during the winter. Feeding on mainly potatoes and whatever else can be found.

    3. Out of this stony rubbish?

      Connects to our class discussions about garbage/trash as a theme. “Stony rubbish” underlines the theme of uselessness, as things can grow out of most trash, but things cannot grow out of stone itself.