304 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
  2. Sep 2021
    1. The phonograph is like a book on tape it could read to people who really needed the help and support. Like the blind people with Learning disabilities the elderly and people who just wanted entertainment.

    2. We go to theaters to see plays. But with movies, TV show and Vlogs on YouTube there are more ways to tell a story. I would argue it’s not cheap entertainment it’s a new way of story telling

  3. Aug 2021
    1. How can you be surprised by your own writing, though? If you’re the author, how could you not know what you’re about to say?

      Discuss: Have you experienced this type of surprise in your own writing? If so can you provide a specific example? Are you the type of writer that prefers to know where you'll end up in a piece of writing OR the type of writer who can be comfortable with uncertainty? Are you a different type of writer altogether?

    1. How do your reports respond to feedback? As managers, it’s our job to grow the people we work with. This is how we build a bench, and scale ourselves and the organization. Of course, this is easy to say and hard to do, and we’ve all encountered a spectrum of people: those with whom it’s easy to accelerate and have a real and lasting impact on, and those where the lasting impact is the relief we feel once we no longer work with them.

      this is also why it is important to have a good culture of frequent feedback. Since it is key to growing the organization, feedback can't be saved for quarterly reviews only.

    1. I believe he wants to use the as const feature while still type checking that the structure matches an interface. A workaround I'd use for something like that would be interface ITest { a: number; b: string; } let foo = { a: 5, b: "Hello" } as const;
    1. Using a flag to disable prettier for a line, the next line or until I activate it again (ESLint like syntax). // prettier-disable border: { sep: "║", topLeft: "╔", topMid: "╦", top: "═", topRight: "╗", midLeft: "╠", midMid: "╬", mid: "═", midRight: "╣", botLeft: "╚", botMid: "╩", bot: "═", botRight: "╝" }, // prettier-enable
    1. There's a lot of cruft here. Consider that while a project might have a prominently named file like "README" that is meant to be the first thing a wanderer encounters, the true first encounter is the file listing in the project source tree:

      • build/
      • config/
      • src/
      • .babelrc
      • .dockerignore
      • .editorconfig
      • .gitignore
      • .stylelintrc
      • .travis.yml
      • Dockerfile
      • Gruntfile.js
      • LICENSE
      • Procfile
      • README.md
      • aldine.sublime-project
      • aldine.sublime-workspace
      • circle.yml
      • package.json
      • tsconfig.json
      • tslint.json
      • yarn.lock

      Imagine a commit (or a pull request) with the summary "Remove cruft". Why might it be rejected? Let's get more specific.

      There's a Dockerfile here. There's also a package.json. We can ask of each of these, "Why is this here?" The answer is, "Because someone found them useful." Consider, then, that here's a strong case for a contrib/ directory† for this project and where these things should be kept, ill-conceived tooling conventions notwithstanding.

      † This link points to a particular blog post that explains the purpose of a contrib/ directory, but this is not an endorsement of Mr DeVault's other positions or demeanor. Ignore any stridence, arrogance, or other obnoxiousness that you might encounter in your pursuit to pull at any threads from that corner of the Web.

    1. when you're reading some fresh code in your browser, do you really want to stop to configure that test harness

      Running the tests should be as easy as opening something in the browser.

    1. "Whether those slashes were forward slashes or back slashes didn't affect how the Web worked," he says, "but it does affect how other developers react to it
    1. Empower managers to facilitate effective learning transfer As Fergal explains, managers have a key role to play in facilitating effective learning transfer. “Research shows that managers play the most critical role in learning transfer - especially in the post-training environment. Every learner needs a manager who understands them, and how they want to learn and grow. They need to have the right coaching style, and they need the right resources.”In most organizations, instructional design focuses on the needs of the learner. But as Fergal explains, focusing on the needs of your managers can pay dividends. “Ideally, you’d have the manager attend the same training as the learner. The problem is, managers are always stretched. So, what you can do instead is develop specific guidance for your managers.” Provide a script for managers to support their team’s learning

      many managers are not used to the coaching-for development approach, or take a hands-off approach to supporting learning and development - managers need to be proactive, and can use support from the L&D team on how to facilitate effective learning transfer / discussions with their teams

    1. Funnily enough, I've been on an intellectual bent in the other direction: that we've poisoned our thinking in terms of systems, for the worse. This shows up when trying to communicate about the Web, for example.

      It's surprisingly difficult to get anyone to conceive of the Web as a medium suited for anything except the "live" behavior exhibited by the systems typically encountered today. (Essentially, thin clients in the form of single-page apps that are useless without a host on the other end for servicing data and computation requests.) The belief/expectation that content providers should be given a pass for producing brittle collections of content that should be considered merely transitory in nature just leads to even more abuse of the medium.

      Even actual programs get put into a ruddy state by this sort of thinking. Often, I don't even care about the program itself, so much as I care about the process it's applying, but maintainers make this effectively inextricable from the implementation details of the program itself (what OS version by which vendor does it target, etc.)

  4. Jul 2021
  5. www.nwp.org www.nwp.org
    1. Writing is the currency of the new workplace and global economy

      No, the finance metaphor is so fraught with capital and considerations of the bottom line that I really buck against this. Writing at its best has never been about using it as a currency. It is not BitCoin.

    1. “But how can I automate updates to my site’s look and feel?!”

      Perversely, the author starts off getting this part wrong!

      The correct answer here is to adopt the same mindset used for print, which is to say, "just don't worry about it; the value of doing so is oversold". If a print org changed their layout sometime between 1995 and 2005, did they issue a recall for all extant copies and then run around trying to replace them with ones consistent with the new "visual refresh"? If an error is noticed in print, it's handled by correcting it and issuing another edition.

      As Tschichold says of the form of the book (in The Form of the Book):

      The work of a book designer differs essentially from that of a graphic artist. While the latter is constantly searching for new means of expression, driven at the very least by his desire for a "personal style", a book designer has to be the loyal and tactful servant of the written word. It is his job to create a manner of presentation whose form neither overshadows nor patronizes the content [... whereas] work of the graphic artist must correspond to the needs of the day

      The fact that people publishing to the web regularly do otherwise—and are expected to do otherwise—is a social problem that has nothing to do with the Web standards themselves. In fact, it has been widely lamented for a long time that with the figurative death of HTML frames, you can no longer update something in one place and have it spread to the entire experience using plain ol' HTML without resorting to a templating engine. It's only recently (with Web Components, etc.) that this has begun to change. (You can update the style and achieve consistency on a static site without the use of a static site generator—where every asset can be handcrafted, without a templating engine.) But it shouldn't need to change; the fixity is a strength.

      As Tschichold goes on to say of the "perfect" design of the book, "methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve have been developed over centuries". Creators publishing on the web would do well to observe, understand, and work similarly.

  6. Jun 2021
    1. Some of the best customers of such a service will be academics.

      Indeed. Web literacy among the masses is pitifully low. Browsermakers are certainly to blame for being poor stewards. Hot Valley startups are responsible as well. (See https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/.)

    1. "Many North American music education programs exclude in vast numbers students who do not embody Euroamerican ideals. One way to begin making music education programs more socially just is to make them more inclusive. For that to happen, we need to develop programs that actively take the standpoint of the least advantaged, and work toward a common good that seeks to undermine hierarchies of advantage and disadvantage. And that, inturn, requires the ability to discuss race directly and meaningfully. Such discussions afford valuable opportunities to confront and evaluate the practical consequences of our actions as music educators. It is only through such conversations, Connell argues, that we come to understand “the real relationships and processes that generate advantage and disadvantage”(p. 125). Unfortunately, these are also conversations many white educators find uncomfortable and prefer to avoid."

    1. it is not about the product

      it is not about the product, but about the process—Christopher R. Rogers

      In humanity there is no product. We're collectively about the process.

      Similar to the idea of human "being" not human "doing".

      Sadly corporations have been exerting power over people and turning us into products or inputs in their processes and dramatically devaluing and erasing our humanity.

    1. "I really appreciate the name change [because] it raises awareness," said Javier Cánovas, assistant professor in the SOM Research Lab, at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute at the Open University of Catalonia in Barcelona. "There are things that we accept as implicit, and we then realize that we can change them because they don't match our society."
    1. Now, when the Coleridge of 21st-century marginalia emerges, he should be able to mark up the books of a million friends at once.

      This could be an interesting service to set up and run.

      I wonder if I could set up a private Hypothes.is group and actually charge a club rate to members for doing such a thing?

  7. May 2021
    1. They're less likely to go into the "Promotions" tab in Gmail (used by ~16% of all email users), for the same reasons above. From my testing, the plain emails typically end up in the Updates tab and some times even in the primary tab. Of course, the text in the email also affects this.
    2. You can use a free spam checker to validate this by testing plain and designed emails.
  8. Apr 2021
    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Anchoring an innovation center on a college campus also gives Starbucks access to ground-floor research and insight into Gen Z interests before scaling new products or processes to market
    1. I really like the ideas in this game: the theme, what it's trying to accomplish (explore the problems with imperialism, if I understood correctly), the game board, the game in general. I want to like it.

      but, I don't think I would like this one enough due to the luck and relying on other players' whims (trading) mechanisms:

      • Dice Rolling
      • Push Your Luck

      You can risk a lot getting an expensive estate, but if you push your luck too much, your risk/gamble won't pay off and you'll permanently lose that [pawn] and those victory points.

  9. Mar 2021
    1. internet being used as the screening venue

      Add this to a growing list I call "Internet as..."

      Internet as human right Internet as film screening venue Internet as public square Internet as digital library Internet as tool/instrument for creative expression Internet as....

    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

    1. TRAILBLAZER-STORY will follow as it turned out to be inevitable for setting up application state for tests. Instead of fumbling around with factories and traits in your tests, you “tell a story” about what to create in which order, easily customizable, and all written using activities.
    1. It is absolutely advisable to use factory in combination with let. let(:song) { factory( Song::Create, { title: "Timebomb", band: "Rancid" } ) }
    2. You should always use operations as factories in tests.
    3. There are several helpers to deal with operation tests and operations used as factories.
    1. Will it also help accomplish another goal — communicating to my students that a classroom of learners is, in my mind, a sort of family?

      I like the broader idea of a classroom itself being a community.

      I do worry that without the appropriate follow up after the fact that this sort of statement, if put on as simple boilerplate, will eventually turn into the corporate message that companies put out about the office and the company being a tight knit family. It's easy to see what a lie this is when the corporation hits hard times and it's first reaction is to fire family members without any care or compassion.

    1. JavaScript needs to fly from its comfy nest, and learn to survive on its own, on equal terms with other languages and run-times. It’s time to grow up, kid.
    2. If JavaScript were detached from the client and server platforms, the pressure of being a monoculture would be lifted — the next iteration of the JavaScript language or run-time would no longer have to please every developer in the world, but instead could focus on pleasing a much smaller audience of developers who love JavaScript and thrive with it, while enabling others to move to alternative languages or run-times.
    3. Despite a growing variety of languages that compile to JavaScript, the language itself remains the dominant language in both client-side and server-side eco-systems for web development. The idea of replacing JavaScript with languages that compile to JavaScript, has been explored, and for whatever reasons, it hasn’t really liberated anyone from JavaScript.
    4. We standardize on a finite subset of JS (such as asm.js) — and avoid the endless struggle through future iterations of the JavaScript language, competing super-sets and transpilers

      asm.js and RPython sound similar (restrictive subsets)

    5. agree to accept JavaScript for what it is, but start to think of it as a kind of VM for other languages
    1. Nee na ndëmm amul.

      Il dit que la sorcellerie n'existe pas.

      nee -- pr. circ. so, demonstratively distant. Cf. nale.

      na -- 1. pr. circ. so, defined distant. How? 'Or' What. 2. function indicator. As.

      ndëmm gi -- symbolic anthropophagia. 🧙

      am+ul (am) v. -- to exist, to have.

    2. Fibar bi jàngal na taawan bu góor ni ñuy dagge reeni aloom.

      Le guérisseur a appris à son fils aîné comment on coupe les racines du Diospyros.

      fibar -- (fibar bi? the healer? as in feebar / fièvre / fever? -- used as a general term for sickness).

      bi -- the (indicates nearness).

      jàngal v. -- to teach (something to someone), to learn (something from someone) -- compare with jàng (as in janga wolof) and jàngale.

      na -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      taaw+an (taaw) bi -- first child, eldest. (taawan -- his eldest).

      bu -- the (indicates relativeness).

      góor gi -- man; male.

      ni -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      ñuy -- they (?).

      dagg+e (dagg) v. -- cut; to cut.

      reen+i (reen) bi -- root, taproot, support.

      aloom gi -- Diospyros mespiliformis, EBENACEA (tree).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BryN2nVE3jY

  10. Feb 2021
    1. identity theft

      Saw this while scrolling through quickly. Since I can't meta highlight another hypothesis annotation

      identity theft

      I hate this term. Banks use it to blame the victims for their failure to authenticate people properly. I wish we had another term. —via > mcr314 Aug 29, 2020 (Public) on "How to Destroy ‘Surveillance C…" (onezero.medium.com)

      This is a fantastic observation and something that isn't often noticed. Victim blaming while simultaneously passing the buck is particularly harmful. Corporations should be held to a much higher standard of care. If corporations are treated as people in the legal system, then they should be held to the same standards.

    1. multiple learned and generalized affectional responses are formed.

      Love can be instinctual but is it a learned behavior if the affectional response is towards someone that you share at least one intimate moment?

    2. The frightened or ailing child clings to its mother, not its father; and this selective responsiveness in times of distress, disturbance, or danger may be used as a measure of the strength of affectional bonds. We have tested this kind of differential responsiveness by presenting to the infants in their cages, in the presence of the two mothers, various fear-producing stimuli such as the moving toy bear illustrated in Figure 13. A typical response to a fear stimulus is shown in Figure 14, and the data on differential responsiveness are presented in Figure 15. It is apparent that the cloth mother is highly preferred over the wire one, and this differential selectivity is enhanced by age and experience. In this situation, the variable of nursing appears to be of absolutely no importance: the infant consistently seeks the soft mother surrogate regardless of nursing condition.

      In this article we see that there is a reference to how the infant clings to its mother in times of need for comfort. During this era it was the mother who was seen as the nurturer and provider, which made sense. Looking at it today, where men play a bigger part in nurturing their children, this is a good example of how studies of today have been able to find the correlation between nurturing behavior and bonds developed by both parents.

    3. Psychologists, at least psychologists who write textbooks, not only show no interest in the origin and development of love or affection, but they seem to be unaware of its very existence.

      There is little to no information about love in our textbook, which leads me to believe that love is one emotion that was not historically explored.

    1. online curation is:

      The most prominent example of this type of online curation, in my personal experience as a teacher, is curating reading lists for my university courses.

      In some cases (more "traditional"), this list is part of the syllabus and coursepack that I distribute ahead of the semester so it's something that I would do in the Summer or during a Winter break. Having taught several courses on a short notice (getting the contract a couple of weeks before the semester starts), I've fine-tuned my technique to be as efficient as possible. Some of my reading lists were better than others and a few were really solid. Teaching with such a reading list is quite a joy. Much more so than teaching from a textbook. At one point, I stopped having printed coursepacks. I simply give links to the fulltext articles available through #OpenAccess or through the databases to which the university's library is subscribed. A few students complained early on but it does mean that they don't have to purchase text material for the course. The reason it's important to me does have to do with the cost of higher education. It's also about shifting the role of text resources. We use these texts to do some work together. It's not like these texts are "transmitting the knowledge" to learners' brains.

      So, that's my more traditional pattern: a syllabus with a list of links to articles (typically PDFs) that I distributed before the semester starts.

      In other cases (my "enhanced" practice), it's something I do every week, based on what has happened in the course. And I do mean a full reading list each week. Class members choose the text on which they want to focus. Though several of them expect me to be "the sage on the stage" who will lead them to that one nugget of wisdom they will have to "retain", a shift happens once they take ownership of those reading choices. That practice is quite timeconsuming and it doesn't necessarily improves my teaching in obvious ways. It's rewarding in other ways. (I sometimes ask learners to find resources on their own, which really deepens the learning process. It requires a significant level of autonomy that they might not reveal during a given semester, even if they have significant experience as university students).

      My routine of building weekly reading lists also means that I got quite a bit of practice at this.

      Typically, I start the collecting with a "forward citation search" in Web of Knowledge, Scopus, or Google Scholar. I often know this one key article which is likely to have been cited by a number of authors more recently. I collect as many of those as possible and some patterns emerge. Quite frequently, there would be subtopics that I rearrange. It might send me in a "rabbithole". Which is ok. I'm in a discovery mode. And some of the texts which fall under my radar at that point become relevant at a further point.

      In other words, I often cast a wide net during the collection phase.

      The selection process is mostly a matter or rearranging the reading list so that the first few items cover enough of the range of subtopics. Sometimes, my lists remain quite long, which means that learners have more choice (which is uncomfortable enough to help them learn). It also involves an organization phase.

      Summarizing the significance of the collection is the basis for my presentation of the list to the class. My description of the collection is the moment in a class meeting during which I switch to lecture mode. If I do it at the end of the class meeting (or just before the break), students are likely to pay less attention, even though it's typically short. If I do If I do it before discussing the items for the current week, it gets a bit confusing. So it often works best if I present this list after we've worked through the previous ones but before some kind of activity which links the two topics.

      As for sharing in the cloud, I typically do this through the LMS I'm using in that institutions. I've tried more public methods but they weren't that effective.

      All this to say... I could probably optimize my method.

    1. These two mistakes, especially the second one, plant worries in your customers mind before they’ve even had time to think of them.
    2. Stop warning people – no contract, no obligations, cancel anytime – companies can’t resist saying this on every pricing page but by using negative words they’re just putting ideas into people’s heads.
    1. Now if you think about it, PJAX sounds a lot like Turbolinks. They both use JS to fetch server-rendered HTML and put it into the DOM. They both do caching and manage the forward and back buttons. It's almost as if the Rails team took a technique developed elsewhere and just rebranded it.
    1. cultural capital

      Introduced by Pierre Bourdieu in the 1970s, the concept has been utilized across a wide spectrum of contemporary sociological research. Cultural capital refers to ‘knowledge’ or ‘skills’ in the broadest sense. Thus, on the production side, cultural capital consists of knowledge about comportment (e.g., what are considered to be the right kinds of professional dress and attitude) and knowledge associated with educational achievement (e.g., rhetorical ability). On the consumption side, cultural capital consists of capacities for discernment or ‘taste’, e.g., the ability to appreciate fine art or fine wine—here, in other words, cultural capital refers to ‘social status acquired through the ability to make cultural distinctions,’ to the ability to recognize and discriminate between the often-subtle categories and signifiers of a highly articulated cultural code. I'm quoting here from (and also heavily paraphrasing) Scott Lash, ‘Pierre Bourdieu: Cultural Economy and Social Change’, in this reader.

  11. Jan 2021
  12. Dec 2020
    1. Does anyone know how to make npm use a specific fork containing a bug fix while waiting for maintainer to merge a pull request? I was just going to point my package.json to this fork, like this: "svelte-material-ui": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git#patch-1", but that doesn't work because the repo is a monorepo. And there doesn't appear to be a way to specify a subdirectory inside it, like: "@smui/textfield": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git/packages/textarea#patch-1",
  13. Nov 2020
    1. Because module members are usually used with a namespace, short and simple names are usually the most readable option. But those names might not make sense outside the module they’re defined in, so @forward has the option of adding an extra prefix to all the members it forwards.
    1. Frontend frameworks are a positive sum game! Svelte has no monopoly on the compiler paradigm either. Just like I think React is worth learning for the mental model it imparts, where UI is a (pure) function of state, I think the frontend framework-as-compiler paradigm is worth understanding. We're going to see a lot more of it because the tradeoffs are fantastic, to where it'll be a boring talking point before we know it.
  14. Oct 2020
    1. He highlights the Memex’s killer feature of associative linking and how trails of links have never been implemented in the way the Memex envisioned: It is associative indexing though, that is the essential feature of the memex, “the process of tying two items together is the important thing.” Bush describes a hypertext like mechanism at this point, but most interesting from my perspective is his emphasis on a trail as a fundamental unit — something we largely seem to have lost today. […] Documents and links we have aplenty. But where are our trails?
    1. There’s an entire category of products commonly known as Platform as a Service (PaaS) that endeavors to make this possible. But, so far, these services have largely fallen short of what developers need. Many of our customers have come to DigitalOcean after their PaaS became too expensive, or after hitting various limitations.
  15. Sep 2020
    1. But because it is espoused by so many leading members of the JavaScript community, scrutiny is all too rarely applied.
    2. It’s written by Sindre Sorhus, whose npm profile is enough to make all but the most prolific developer feel wholly inadequate, and so carries with it a degree of authority.
    1. The main rationale for this PR is that, in my hones opinion, Svelte needs a way to support style overrides in an intuitive and close to plain HTML/CSS way. What I regard as intuitive is: Looking at how customizing of styles is being done when applying a typical CSS component framework, and making that possible with Svelte.
    1. The more I think about this, the more I think that maybe React already has the right solution to this particular issue, and we're tying ourselves in knots trying to avoid unnecessary re-rendering. Basically, this JSX... <Foo {...a} b={1} {...c} d={2}/> ...translates to this JS: React.createElement(Foo, _extends({}, a, { b: 1 }, c, { d: 2 })); If we did the same thing (i.e. bail out of the optimisation allowed by knowing the attribute names ahead of time), our lives would get a lot simpler, and the performance characteristics would be pretty similar in all but somewhat contrived scenarios, I think. (It'll still be faster than React, anyway!)