275 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. They're less likely to go into the "Promotions" tab in Gmail (used by ~16% of all email users), for the same reasons above. From my testing, the plain emails typically end up in the Updates tab and some times even in the primary tab. Of course, the text in the email also affects this.
    2. You can use a free spam checker to validate this by testing plain and designed emails.
  2. Apr 2021
    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Anchoring an innovation center on a college campus also gives Starbucks access to ground-floor research and insight into Gen Z interests before scaling new products or processes to market
    1. I really like the ideas in this game: the theme, what it's trying to accomplish (explore the problems with imperialism, if I understood correctly), the game board, the game in general. I want to like it.

      but, I don't think I would like this one enough due to the luck and relying on other players' whims (trading) mechanisms:

      • Dice Rolling
      • Push Your Luck

      You can risk a lot getting an expensive estate, but if you push your luck too much, your risk/gamble won't pay off and you'll permanently lose that [pawn] and those victory points.

  3. Mar 2021
    1. internet being used as the screening venue

      Add this to a growing list I call "Internet as..."

      Internet as human right Internet as film screening venue Internet as public square Internet as digital library Internet as tool/instrument for creative expression Internet as....

    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

    1. TRAILBLAZER-STORY will follow as it turned out to be inevitable for setting up application state for tests. Instead of fumbling around with factories and traits in your tests, you “tell a story” about what to create in which order, easily customizable, and all written using activities.
    1. It is absolutely advisable to use factory in combination with let. let(:song) { factory( Song::Create, { title: "Timebomb", band: "Rancid" } ) }
    2. You should always use operations as factories in tests.
    3. There are several helpers to deal with operation tests and operations used as factories.
    1. Will it also help accomplish another goal — communicating to my students that a classroom of learners is, in my mind, a sort of family?

      I like the broader idea of a classroom itself being a community.

      I do worry that without the appropriate follow up after the fact that this sort of statement, if put on as simple boilerplate, will eventually turn into the corporate message that companies put out about the office and the company being a tight knit family. It's easy to see what a lie this is when the corporation hits hard times and it's first reaction is to fire family members without any care or compassion.

    1. JavaScript needs to fly from its comfy nest, and learn to survive on its own, on equal terms with other languages and run-times. It’s time to grow up, kid.
    2. If JavaScript were detached from the client and server platforms, the pressure of being a monoculture would be lifted — the next iteration of the JavaScript language or run-time would no longer have to please every developer in the world, but instead could focus on pleasing a much smaller audience of developers who love JavaScript and thrive with it, while enabling others to move to alternative languages or run-times.
    3. Despite a growing variety of languages that compile to JavaScript, the language itself remains the dominant language in both client-side and server-side eco-systems for web development. The idea of replacing JavaScript with languages that compile to JavaScript, has been explored, and for whatever reasons, it hasn’t really liberated anyone from JavaScript.
    4. We standardize on a finite subset of JS (such as asm.js) — and avoid the endless struggle through future iterations of the JavaScript language, competing super-sets and transpilers

      asm.js and RPython sound similar (restrictive subsets)

    5. agree to accept JavaScript for what it is, but start to think of it as a kind of VM for other languages
    1. Nee na ndëmm amul.

      Il dit que la sorcellerie n'existe pas.

      nee -- pr. circ. so, demonstratively distant. Cf. nale.

      na -- 1. pr. circ. so, defined distant. How? 'Or' What. 2. function indicator. As.

      ndëmm gi -- symbolic anthropophagia. 🧙

      am+ul (am) v. -- to exist, to have.

    2. Fibar bi jàngal na taawan bu góor ni ñuy dagge reeni aloom.

      Le guérisseur a appris à son fils aîné comment on coupe les racines du Diospyros.

      fibar -- (fibar bi? the healer? as in feebar / fièvre / fever? -- used as a general term for sickness).

      bi -- the (indicates nearness).

      jàngal v. -- to teach (something to someone), to learn (something from someone) -- compare with jàng (as in janga wolof) and jàngale.

      na -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      taaw+an (taaw) bi -- first child, eldest. (taawan -- his eldest).

      bu -- the (indicates relativeness).

      góor gi -- man; male.

      ni -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      ñuy -- they (?).

      dagg+e (dagg) v. -- cut; to cut.

      reen+i (reen) bi -- root, taproot, support.

      aloom gi -- Diospyros mespiliformis, EBENACEA (tree).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BryN2nVE3jY

  4. Feb 2021
    1. identity theft

      Saw this while scrolling through quickly. Since I can't meta highlight another hypothesis annotation

      identity theft

      I hate this term. Banks use it to blame the victims for their failure to authenticate people properly. I wish we had another term. —via > mcr314 Aug 29, 2020 (Public) on "How to Destroy ‘Surveillance C…" (onezero.medium.com)

      This is a fantastic observation and something that isn't often noticed. Victim blaming while simultaneously passing the buck is particularly harmful. Corporations should be held to a much higher standard of care. If corporations are treated as people in the legal system, then they should be held to the same standards.

    1. multiple learned and generalized affectional responses are formed.

      Love can be instinctual but is it a learned behavior if the affectional response is towards someone that you share at least one intimate moment?

    2. The frightened or ailing child clings to its mother, not its father; and this selective responsiveness in times of distress, disturbance, or danger may be used as a measure of the strength of affectional bonds. We have tested this kind of differential responsiveness by presenting to the infants in their cages, in the presence of the two mothers, various fear-producing stimuli such as the moving toy bear illustrated in Figure 13. A typical response to a fear stimulus is shown in Figure 14, and the data on differential responsiveness are presented in Figure 15. It is apparent that the cloth mother is highly preferred over the wire one, and this differential selectivity is enhanced by age and experience. In this situation, the variable of nursing appears to be of absolutely no importance: the infant consistently seeks the soft mother surrogate regardless of nursing condition.

      In this article we see that there is a reference to how the infant clings to its mother in times of need for comfort. During this era it was the mother who was seen as the nurturer and provider, which made sense. Looking at it today, where men play a bigger part in nurturing their children, this is a good example of how studies of today have been able to find the correlation between nurturing behavior and bonds developed by both parents.

    3. Psychologists, at least psychologists who write textbooks, not only show no interest in the origin and development of love or affection, but they seem to be unaware of its very existence.

      There is little to no information about love in our textbook, which leads me to believe that love is one emotion that was not historically explored.

    1. online curation is:

      The most prominent example of this type of online curation, in my personal experience as a teacher, is curating reading lists for my university courses.

      In some cases (more "traditional"), this list is part of the syllabus and coursepack that I distribute ahead of the semester so it's something that I would do in the Summer or during a Winter break. Having taught several courses on a short notice (getting the contract a couple of weeks before the semester starts), I've fine-tuned my technique to be as efficient as possible. Some of my reading lists were better than others and a few were really solid. Teaching with such a reading list is quite a joy. Much more so than teaching from a textbook. At one point, I stopped having printed coursepacks. I simply give links to the fulltext articles available through #OpenAccess or through the databases to which the university's library is subscribed. A few students complained early on but it does mean that they don't have to purchase text material for the course. The reason it's important to me does have to do with the cost of higher education. It's also about shifting the role of text resources. We use these texts to do some work together. It's not like these texts are "transmitting the knowledge" to learners' brains.

      So, that's my more traditional pattern: a syllabus with a list of links to articles (typically PDFs) that I distributed before the semester starts.

      In other cases (my "enhanced" practice), it's something I do every week, based on what has happened in the course. And I do mean a full reading list each week. Class members choose the text on which they want to focus. Though several of them expect me to be "the sage on the stage" who will lead them to that one nugget of wisdom they will have to "retain", a shift happens once they take ownership of those reading choices. That practice is quite timeconsuming and it doesn't necessarily improves my teaching in obvious ways. It's rewarding in other ways. (I sometimes ask learners to find resources on their own, which really deepens the learning process. It requires a significant level of autonomy that they might not reveal during a given semester, even if they have significant experience as university students).

      My routine of building weekly reading lists also means that I got quite a bit of practice at this.

      Typically, I start the collecting with a "forward citation search" in Web of Knowledge, Scopus, or Google Scholar. I often know this one key article which is likely to have been cited by a number of authors more recently. I collect as many of those as possible and some patterns emerge. Quite frequently, there would be subtopics that I rearrange. It might send me in a "rabbithole". Which is ok. I'm in a discovery mode. And some of the texts which fall under my radar at that point become relevant at a further point.

      In other words, I often cast a wide net during the collection phase.

      The selection process is mostly a matter or rearranging the reading list so that the first few items cover enough of the range of subtopics. Sometimes, my lists remain quite long, which means that learners have more choice (which is uncomfortable enough to help them learn). It also involves an organization phase.

      Summarizing the significance of the collection is the basis for my presentation of the list to the class. My description of the collection is the moment in a class meeting during which I switch to lecture mode. If I do it at the end of the class meeting (or just before the break), students are likely to pay less attention, even though it's typically short. If I do If I do it before discussing the items for the current week, it gets a bit confusing. So it often works best if I present this list after we've worked through the previous ones but before some kind of activity which links the two topics.

      As for sharing in the cloud, I typically do this through the LMS I'm using in that institutions. I've tried more public methods but they weren't that effective.

      All this to say... I could probably optimize my method.

    1. These two mistakes, especially the second one, plant worries in your customers mind before they’ve even had time to think of them.
    2. Stop warning people – no contract, no obligations, cancel anytime – companies can’t resist saying this on every pricing page but by using negative words they’re just putting ideas into people’s heads.
    1. Now if you think about it, PJAX sounds a lot like Turbolinks. They both use JS to fetch server-rendered HTML and put it into the DOM. They both do caching and manage the forward and back buttons. It's almost as if the Rails team took a technique developed elsewhere and just rebranded it.
    1. cultural capital

      Introduced by Pierre Bourdieu in the 1970s, the concept has been utilized across a wide spectrum of contemporary sociological research. Cultural capital refers to ‘knowledge’ or ‘skills’ in the broadest sense. Thus, on the production side, cultural capital consists of knowledge about comportment (e.g., what are considered to be the right kinds of professional dress and attitude) and knowledge associated with educational achievement (e.g., rhetorical ability). On the consumption side, cultural capital consists of capacities for discernment or ‘taste’, e.g., the ability to appreciate fine art or fine wine—here, in other words, cultural capital refers to ‘social status acquired through the ability to make cultural distinctions,’ to the ability to recognize and discriminate between the often-subtle categories and signifiers of a highly articulated cultural code. I'm quoting here from (and also heavily paraphrasing) Scott Lash, ‘Pierre Bourdieu: Cultural Economy and Social Change’, in this reader.

  5. Jan 2021
  6. Dec 2020
    1. Does anyone know how to make npm use a specific fork containing a bug fix while waiting for maintainer to merge a pull request? I was just going to point my package.json to this fork, like this: "svelte-material-ui": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git#patch-1", but that doesn't work because the repo is a monorepo. And there doesn't appear to be a way to specify a subdirectory inside it, like: "@smui/textfield": "https://github.com/vtpatrickeddy/svelte-material-ui.git/packages/textarea#patch-1",
  7. Nov 2020
    1. Because module members are usually used with a namespace, short and simple names are usually the most readable option. But those names might not make sense outside the module they’re defined in, so @forward has the option of adding an extra prefix to all the members it forwards.
    1. Frontend frameworks are a positive sum game! Svelte has no monopoly on the compiler paradigm either. Just like I think React is worth learning for the mental model it imparts, where UI is a (pure) function of state, I think the frontend framework-as-compiler paradigm is worth understanding. We're going to see a lot more of it because the tradeoffs are fantastic, to where it'll be a boring talking point before we know it.
  8. Oct 2020
    1. He highlights the Memex’s killer feature of associative linking and how trails of links have never been implemented in the way the Memex envisioned: It is associative indexing though, that is the essential feature of the memex, “the process of tying two items together is the important thing.” Bush describes a hypertext like mechanism at this point, but most interesting from my perspective is his emphasis on a trail as a fundamental unit — something we largely seem to have lost today. […] Documents and links we have aplenty. But where are our trails?
    1. There’s an entire category of products commonly known as Platform as a Service (PaaS) that endeavors to make this possible. But, so far, these services have largely fallen short of what developers need. Many of our customers have come to DigitalOcean after their PaaS became too expensive, or after hitting various limitations.
  9. Sep 2020
    1. But because it is espoused by so many leading members of the JavaScript community, scrutiny is all too rarely applied.
    2. It’s written by Sindre Sorhus, whose npm profile is enough to make all but the most prolific developer feel wholly inadequate, and so carries with it a degree of authority.
    1. The main rationale for this PR is that, in my hones opinion, Svelte needs a way to support style overrides in an intuitive and close to plain HTML/CSS way. What I regard as intuitive is: Looking at how customizing of styles is being done when applying a typical CSS component framework, and making that possible with Svelte.
    1. The more I think about this, the more I think that maybe React already has the right solution to this particular issue, and we're tying ourselves in knots trying to avoid unnecessary re-rendering. Basically, this JSX... <Foo {...a} b={1} {...c} d={2}/> ...translates to this JS: React.createElement(Foo, _extends({}, a, { b: 1 }, c, { d: 2 })); If we did the same thing (i.e. bail out of the optimisation allowed by knowing the attribute names ahead of time), our lives would get a lot simpler, and the performance characteristics would be pretty similar in all but somewhat contrived scenarios, I think. (It'll still be faster than React, anyway!)
    1. Please focus on explaining the motivation so that if this RFC is not accepted, the motivation could be used to develop alternative solutions. In other words, enumerate the constraints you are trying to solve without coupling them too closely to the solution you have in mind.
    2. A huge part of the value on an RFC is defining the problem clearly, collecting use cases, showing how others have solved a problem, etc.
    3. An RFC can provide tremendous value without the design described in it being accepted.
    1. For a non-monorepo package you can simply point directly to the Github repo. This case is similar, but you want to scope it just to a single package within the repo. For those that make monorepos they don't necessarily need this feature. It's for those that use projects that use monorepos. Telling them to not organize their projects into monorepos doesn't help people who make use of these projects.
    2. If npm installs a git repo, it assumes that the git repo is the package. I don't really know how we could specify a sub-path easily, since all parts of the git url are already used for other things.
    1. This is more a rhetoric question as this seems to be quite hard ;-) There is a long discussion about installing a subfolder of a repository and monorepos in general at the NPM Github issues (yarn misses this feature, too). The thing is that this makes it quite hard to report issues of your project as one can't test the current master easily. Do you recommend a way how to use the latest Github version?
  10. Aug 2020
    1. As a web designer, I hate that "log in" creates a visual space between the words. If you line up "Log In Register" - is that three links or two? This creates a Gestalt problem, meaning you have to really fiddle with spacing to get the word groupings right, without using pipe characters.

      Sure, you can try to solve that problem by using a one-word alternative for any multi-word phrase, but that's not always possible: there isn't always a single word that can be used for every possible phrase you may have.

      Adjusting the letter-spacing and margin between items in your list isn't that hard and would be better in the long run since it gives you a scalable, general solution.

      "Log in" is the only correct way to spell the verb, and the only way to be consistent with 1000s of other phrasal verbs that are spelled with a space in them.

      We don't need nor want an exception to the general rule just for "login" just because so many people have made that mistake.

  11. Jul 2020
    1. Article 7(3) of the GDPR prescribes that the controller must ensure that consent can be withdrawn bythe data subject as easy as giving consent and at any given time. The GDPR does not say that givingand withdrawing consent must always be done through the same action.
    2. consent is obtained through use of a service-specific user interface (for example, via a website, an app,a log-on account, the interface of an IoT device or by e-mail), there is no doubt a data subject must beable to withdraw consent via the same electronic interface, as switching to another interface for thesole reason of withdrawing consentwould require undue effort.
    3. The controller informs customers that they havethe possibility to withdraw consent. To do this, they could contact a call centre on business daysbetween 8am and 5pm, free of charge. The controller in this example doesnotcomply with article 7(3)of the GDPR. Withdrawing consent in this case requires a telephone call during business hours, this ismore burdensome than the one mouse-click needed for giving consent through the online ticketvendor, which is open 24/7.
    1. Creating and calling a default proc is a waste of time, and Cramming everything into one line using tortured constructs doesn't make the code more efficient--it just makes the code harder to understand.

      The nature of this "answer" is a comment in response to another answer. But because of the limitations SO puts on comments (very short length, no multi-line code snippets), comment feature could not actually be used, so this user resorted to "abusing" answer feature to post their comment instead.

      See

    1. By honoring the mammae as sign and symbol of the highest class ofanimals, Linnaeus assigned a new value to the female, especially women’s unique rolein reproduction

      Throughout the multiple texts, utilized human-parts place specified bodies within social constructions, given limits of autonomy dependent on close monitoring by superiors. Kirkup and Schiebinger reflect on the Womxn’s breasts dictating the taxonomy of humans as mammalia--”a study of breasts." We see this era uplifted the sacredness of milk and the role of women’s reproduction, whilst stationing them closer to “beasts” than men, and assigning women to domesticity.

      Breasts as parts, natural tools embedded in the female body, parallels the seemingly hopeful outlook on this developing Cyborg body’s own parts, but these parts remain observed and reduced to science--a socially constructed pyramid falsely dubbed as standardized and empirical--determining the value and humanity of minorities. The parts of the female and POC body do not grant the bearer their autonomy, but rather outside scrutiny and oversight.

      We established mid 20th-century authors dubbed living beings as very complex machines, and question "are humans machines?"--can we break down the human/machine boundary by referring the symbol of breasts as also a mechanized part? I feel through Haraway's Cyborg we can, as rough as it feels to conceptualize breasts as another gear/customization.

    2. on a stage two feet high, along which she was led by her keeper, and exhibited like awild beast; being obliged to walk, stand, or sit as he ordered her.”6

      African women’s breasts are dubbed “beastly,” “pendulous” (Schiebinger 26)--using breasts and vaginal physical traits as a determinism to rank women by race. As Saartjie Bartman’s naked body is exhibited an object--reminding of a modern tech convention putting foreign car parts on a pedestal--the male scientific gaze is further scrutinizing and classifying womxn by parts.

      Thus the eyes of the male gaze are the male scientists, carried down to the audience’s white curiosity--the circus scene is disquieting. Further investigation of her body only continues to stretch the spectacle of Saartjie Baartman, exhibited like colonized art within museum, even as a corpse.

    3. reast shapes amonghumans

      The mathematical, geometric breakdown of the breast's shape feels uncomfortable like an engineer's diagram--dictating its value by diameter. This continues my thought that body parts are observed as machine parts under the male and scientific gaze.

  12. May 2020
    1. The administration and its allies fear that the more people gravitate toward the successful, free-market self-insurance approach, the worse their government-engineered health “reform” will look. We’re already seeing the beginning of this trend.
    1. Authors of third-party tools should prefix each label key with the reverse DNS notation of a domain they own, such as com.example.some-label.
    1. By putting our data in the corporate cloud, we are that kid. We are giving corporations and governments a way to see where we are looking towards, and they can predict our future and decide whether and how to intervene or subvert.
    2. From a game theoretic standpoint, we’ve already lost. Too many of our civil society adversaries have too much of our data, and we have so little of theirs.