658 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. For the past four years, I’ve followed a group of steelworkers in Indiana — men and women, Black and white — who had worked at a factory that moved to Mexico. I watched them agonize about whether to train their Mexican replacements, or stand with their union and refuse. I watched them grieve the plant like a parent. I followed them as they applied for new jobs, some of which paid half as much as they made before.A machinist named Tim carried his steelworker union card in his wallet for years after the factory closed, just to remind himself who he was. Tim grew up in a union household. His dad had been an autoworker; his grandfather, a coal miner.“We always voted Democrat because they looked after the little man,” Tim told me. “My father went to his grave and I can guarantee you he never voted for a Republican.”Tim had such faith in Democrats that he didn’t worry when President Bill Clinton pushed the North American Free Trade Agreement over the finish line in 1993. Nor did he worry when Mr. Clinton normalized trade with China in 2000. But then the factory where Tim worked moved to Shanghai. And the next one moved to Mexico.Editors’ PicksA Korean Store Owner. A Black Employee. A Tense Neighborhood.The Problem of Free Speech in an Age of Disinformation5 Things to Avoid on Prime DayAdvertisementContinue reading the main storyBy the time I met Tim, he loathed the Clintons and the Democratic Party. Democrats had gotten in bed with the corporations, while no one was looking. Tim felt betrayed, and politically abandoned — until Mr. Trump came along.

      By the time I met Tim, he loathed the Clintons and the Democratic Party. Democrats had gotten in bed with the corporations, while no one was looking. Tim felt betrayed, and politically abandoned — until Mr. Trump came along.

      +1

    1. Historians and political scientists see the matter differently today. Kennedy’s own vote counters later conceded that he lost 59 out of 70 white precincts in Gary. While Kennedy’s internal polls showed him faring better than might be expected among former supporters of George Wallace’s bid for the Democratic nomination four years earlier, he nevertheless struggled to retain working-class, white ethnic voters and relied instead on robust turnout in minority neighborhoods for his electoral cushion.

      Democrats were already on the trajectory of losing blue-collar whites by the end of the 60s.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. usually overwhelmed by misconceptions (the charitable interpretation) or lies and propaganda (the more accurate one). Some of the most prominent politicians in the country — notably Senator Ted Cruz — routinely lie to the public about what the law says and how courts have interpreted it.

      LOLGOP

    1. However the political crisis within the state apparatus develops over the next month, American democracy is at death’s door. The serendipitous accident of the White House pandemic cannot restore health to a social and political system that is rotten to the core.
    1. “Using Twitter to bypass traditional media and directly reach voters is definitely a good thing,” Newt Gingrich said, in 2009.

      Is this because it makes it easier for misdirection and outright lies to reach an audience without being checked and verified? Very likely.

    1. anomie

      I feel like this word captures very well the exact era of Trumpian Republicanism in which we find ourselves living.

    1. When people do inexplicable things, it’s always tempting to project qualities onto them that would offer a more innocuous explanation of their behavior than bad judgment, fecklessness, or stupidity. And this particular bias has infected contemporary political analysis with a virulence that rivals Ebola. Even when the subject’s motives are as transparent as Donald Trump’s, there will always be a class of pundit who insists that Trump is playing 3-D chess, when, as one anonymous staffer put it, “more often than not he’s just eating the pieces.” 
    1. Most previous explanations had focussed on explaining how someone’s beliefs might be altered in the moment.

      Knowing a little of what is coming in advance here, I can't help but thinking: How can this riot theory potentially be used to influence politics and/or political campaigns? It could be particularly effective to get people "riled up" just before a particular election to create a political riot of sorts and thereby influence the outcome.

      Facebook has done several social experiments with elections in showing that their friends and family voted and thereby affecting other potential voters. When done in a way that targets people of particular political beliefs to increase turn out, one is given a means of drastically influencing elections. In some sense, this is an example of this "Riot Theory".

    1. The prevalent practice of damaging images of the human form—and the anxiety surrounding the desecration—dates to the beginnings of Egyptian history. Intentionally damaged mummies from the prehistoric period, for example, speak to a “very basic cultural belief that damaging the image damages the person represented,” Bleiberg said. Likewise, how-to hieroglyphics provided instructions for warriors about to enter battle: Make a wax effigy of the enemy, then destroy it. Series of texts describe the anxiety of your own image becoming damaged, and pharaohs regularly issued decrees with terrible punishments for anyone who would dare threaten their likeness.
    2. “Imagery in public space is a reflection of who has the power to tell the story of what happened and what should be remembered,” Bleiberg said. “We are witnessing the empowerment of many groups of people with different opinions of what the proper narrative is.” Perhaps we can learn from the pharaohs; how we choose to rewrite our national stories might just take a few acts of iconoclasm.
    1. Publishers are eager to please state policymakers of both parties, during a challenging time for the business. Schools are transitioning to digital materials. And with the ease of internet research, many teachers say they prefer to curate their own primary-source materials online.

      Here's where OER textbooks might help to make some change. If free materials with less input from politicians and more input from educators were available. But then this pushes the onus down to a different level with different political aspirations. I have to think that taking the politicization of these decisions at a state level would have to help.

    1. In fact, only two regional cultures consistently exhibit urban-rural vote splitting, and together they account for just 15 percent of the population. Only in the Midlands has the split been a stark one.
  3. moodle.southwestern.edu moodle.southwestern.edu
    1. unbiased

      The Republican party will never stop claiming the media is bias, so I am surprised they are claiming they have resolved this issue. I would think they would want to keep acknowledging it as an issue.

  4. moodle.southwestern.edu moodle.southwestern.edu
    1. "The President has been regulating to death a free market economy" - it's interesting how much this preamble throws Trump under the bus

    2. "our enemies no longer fear us and our friends no long trust us" - I guess the democrats and republicans agree on this.

    3. "This platform is optimistic because the American people are optimistic." This is completely unsupported by everything stated before it.

    4. "covenant" "Creator" "God-given natural resources" "prepared to deal with evil in the world" show religious tone

    1. Friends and foes alike neither admire nor fear President Trump’s leadership

      I feel like there are countries who fear his leadership.

    2. The challenges before us—the worst public health crisis in a century, the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the worst period of global upheaval in a generation, the urgent global crisis posed by climate change, the intolerable racial injustice that still stains the fabric of our nation—will test America’s character like never before.

      I know that we are making history but it doesn't exactly feel like it. The election feels like a joke. There is a stark difference between what came out of Roosevelt's mouth and either of the presidential candidates mouth's. Now it is a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils than a heroic leader to help our country achieve greatness.

    3. a more perfect union

      I feel like this goal has been abandoned.

    1. That is not what the parent comment is arguing. It is arguing that

      That is not what the parent comment is arguing. It is arguing that [...]

      The problem is that it's arguing against a strawman. The statement by Coinbase doesn't avow an apolitical stance—that's a description that has become attached to Coinbase's statement by way of third parties' summarizing it. The company acknowledges that there's a mission. There is no pretense that it's an apolitical one. What is does say is that Coinbase is not going to take a stance on broader social causes and that they aren't going to engage in any internal advocacy for any cause except its direct mission. And in fact it goes on to say things like "even if we all agree that something is a problem, we may not agree on how to actually go solve it".

      This is the position you have to go up against if you want to engage in a serious discussion about it. To try to take it down with semantic jiu-jitsu on the (clumsy) words of someone else is not engaging with it seriously.

  5. Sep 2020
    1. 1. Political intent - acting or omitting to act because of a political view point. 2. Political outcomes - the results of actions or omissions to act which impact politics.

      nope

      1. political beliefs' (which may be silent or voiced) effects on society, due to the way it shapes what a person does or doesn't do ("outcomes"), including how a person votes
      2. overt political endorsement and other types of proclamations

      when people say they want the workplace to be apolitical, they're talking about #2. to ignore this is to equivocate

    2. Perhaps that is because, in this instance the term “political” has 2 meanings

      absolutely true

    3. You are mischaracterising the point and assuming bad intent.

      Where's the assumption of ill intent? Intimidation can be emergent; intent doesn't have to be a prerequisite.

      (If you're not convinced, consider this: the threat of rape. If you're a man, it's very likely that at some point a woman felt intimidated by you—even if just over the uncertainty about you and the threat you pose—and that's true even if you've never raped anybody and never intend to.)

    4. supports the status quo

      ho ho, this is the kind of utterance that gives away one's privilege of being (and perhaps having always existed) in an environment where your peers are on your side—a sort of local status quo

      ask liberals how easy it was being liberal in a red state in the time between 9/11 and Obama's election (and even after). it's precisely those against the then status quo who were happy for everyone to shut up and get on with things without making political quips or worse: attempts to have serious conversations around politics (for some definition of "serious")

      this comment is complete fucking horseshit

    5. I (and many others) are of the opinion that you can’t truly be apolitical; claiming to be so is its own form of politics

      all right, let's lean into it then: declare that this workplace's politics is the one described

    1. So how should we think about federalism in the ageof coronavirus? The answer is to emphasize theimportance of building social solidarity — the beliefin a shared fate for all Americans that transcendsstate or regional identities

      What makes Americans not have a social solidarity?

    2. institutional antagonism willprevent the concentration of power, encouragesindividualist mentalities that lead to self-interestedactions and erode national unity.

      What makes Americans so individualistic? What is different about Taiwan’s society that made their people more selfless?

    1. “We’re changing federalism from the idea of shared expertise in different policy areas into partisan stakes in the ground that are meant to obstruct opponents,” Robertson says.

      This is so true with the Trump Administrations "Alternative Facts" it is as though we will soon be living in the dystopian novel Brave New World.

    2. “The coronavirus response is actually sort of a perfect measuring stick of our transition to our contemporary, very polarized model of federalism.”

      I want to reference the Netflix documentary Social Dilemma. The documentary says that the reason politics has become so polarized is because of social media. Everyone is operating off of a different set of facts.

    3. He has threatened to withhold federal funds from school districts that don’t open for in-person instruction.

      Is it within Trump's right to do this?

    4. He has threatened to withhold federal funds from school districts that don’t open for in-person instruction.

      Is it within trump's rights to do this?

    1. Facebook ignored or was slow to act on evidence that fake accounts on its platform have been undermining elections and political affairs around the world, according to an explosive memo sent by a recently fired Facebook employee and obtained by BuzzFeed News.The 6,600-word memo, written by former Facebook data scientist Sophie Zhang, is filled with concrete examples of heads of government and political parties in Azerbaijan and Honduras using fake accounts or misrepresenting themselves to sway public opinion. In countries including India, Ukraine, Spain, Brazil, Bolivia, and Ecuador, she found evidence of coordinated campaigns of varying sizes to boost or hinder political candidates or outcomes, though she did not always conclude who was behind them.
    1. It could create incentives for action by conditioning a portion of funds going to states in any future relief packages on states’ adherence to the measures

      Why did this not happen? I feel like it isn’t the federalist system in general that are failing us— it’s the leaders of the system. Why did congress not make a playbook and create incentives for states to follow them? This reminds me of how the drinking age became 21 in every state from the funding of the highways.

    2. Lacking strong federal leadership to guide a uniform response, the United States quickly fulfilled the World Health Organization’s prediction that it would become the new epicenter of Covid-19.

      I wonder if a democrat was in office when covid hit if we would have stronger federal leadership. Would we have been in a state of emergency if someone who believed in the facts of science wasn’t in office? I have trouble believing that there is nothing the president could have done to prevent covid from getting this out of hand.

    3. subject to constitutionally protected individual rights such as due process, equal protection, and freedom of travel and association

      I didn’t know that it is within our rights to travel and associate with whomever we choose. I wouldn’t think the government would be able to control who would be able to leave their house or hang out with who anyway. I guess this shows how right the article about uninformed citizens we read last week is right.

    4. Strong, decisive national action is therefore imperative.

      I could not agree with this statement more. I think if the US had some kind of national healthcare program the coronavirus would be much more under control.

    1. There are in history what you could call ‘plastic hours,’” the philosopher Gershom Scholem once said. “Namely, crucial moments when it is possible to act. If you move then, something happens.”
    1. This super-sketchy experiment had one final phase, how-ever: reconciliation. After successive scenarios were deployed where the Rattlers and the Eagles had common goals (unblock-ing a shared water supply, repairing a truck, etc.) they grew closer, even splitting drinks at the end (malts, come on people). In our work, we may not call them Rattlers and Eagles. Instead, we may call them IT and Legal and Marketing. Or “weird-code-name product-team one” versus “weird-code-name product-team two”. But if organizations incentivize based on scarcity and self-interest, we might as well just call it what it is, a scaled version of the Robbers Cave experiment. And to mitigate the siloing and combat ingroup bias, we’ll have to consider following a different approach.

      How can we do this for the democrats and the republicans?

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  6. Aug 2020
    1. the doctrine that all endowments are national property, which the government may and ought to control; but not, as I should once have done, condemning endowments in themselves, and proposing that they should be taken to pay off the national debt.

      What is meant by “endowment” here?

    1. The first step is to abandon the business model of education. States need to be willing to reverse the endless budget cuts that have left universities so reliant on stratospheric tuition. Any new funds, however, need to be flagged for instructional budgets and conditioned on tenure-track hires, not more rock-climbing walls, further adjunctification, or empty-chair administrators.
    1. Larry Kudlow expects large economic recovery numbers in 3rd and 4th quarter

      What is the value of predictions from someone wrong every single time? Since April 2018, Larry Kudlow was wrong on all his predictions regarding economics and other issues that he somehow thought was necessary to comment on. If he would be reciting chicken pie recipes in Esperanto would be a better contribution to the viewers and his career. That would be very bad for him if he would be the Director of the National Economic Council. Thank God he is not.

    1. DeSantis is the state version of Donald Trump. It's only a state wide range of stupidity celebration. He is not on Mount Rushmore level of moron-ism like the orange president.

      He is more like on Robert Lee small town square statue level...but, never than less, he now, holds then decision of living and dying. To much power to anyone, imagine for an anencephalic?

      DeSantis, do you know what a body count is?

    1. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK), since 1922 comprises four countries: England, Scotland, and Wales (which collectively make up Great Britain) and Northern Ireland[1][2] (which is variously described as a country, province, or region).

      A country that contains 4 countries. It's almost a paradox. It never ceases to amuse me.

    1. It's wishful thinking to believe that a group of people competing to advance their agendas will be universally pleased with any hierarchy of knowledge. The best that we can hope for is a detente in which everyone is equally miserable.

      The fate of true democracies.

  7. Jul 2020
    1. “Essentially a friend of mine is head of procurement for NHS London. He has really struggled to get stuff to people in the right timeframe. So essentially what we decided to do was set up a little company and become sales agents for people in the UK who have got stock. And then essentially we would help in linking up the supply chains that are massively disastrous at the moment.”

      essentially

    2. Singleton said he disclosed his business to superiors in the NHS, in accordance with the rules, and was told there was “unlikely to be a conflict”.

      I can see 3 different explanations for this response:

      • He offered a cut of the profits to the superiors
      • He was unclear / lied about what exactly the business was about
      • The superiors are incompetent
  8. Jun 2020
    1. America’s workplace problems don’t begin and end with the identities of those atop corporate hierarchies—they’re embedded in the hierarchies themselves.
    1. they had already sent hundreds of thousands of people to this country to spread that virus

      Hard to say if they explicitly "sent" these people to spread the virus. I do agree that it is heinous that they didn't disclose information about the virus for the first month or so, and that might've been on purpose

    1. I wonder how I can tie this into the furry fandom as a whole. It's pretty clear from this graph that members of the furry fandom, even in Texas, seem to lean towards more liberal political beliefs. Considering the large LGBTQIA+ & animal rights activist populations, groups that tend to skew more liberal themselves, within the furry fandom, this isn't entirely surprising.

  9. psyarxiv.com psyarxiv.com