36 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2022
  2. Mar 2022
  3. Jan 2022
  4. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Every morning now brought its regular duties—shops were to be visited; some new part of the town to be looked at; and the pump-room to be attended, where they paraded up and down for an hour, looking at everybody and speaking to no one.

      Jane Austen’s contemporaries, including everyone from the laboring poor to the royals, shared a belief in the restorative power of spring water and in the consumption of natural remedies. In the years when Austen was writing Northanger Abbey, the warm springs offered at Bath’s Pump rooms were a popular treatmentfor those suffering from loss of appetite, nerves (Mrs. Bennett!), gout, and ailments affecting the stomach, head, and vital parts.

      In 1813, a guide to the resort claimed that the waters contained carbon dioxide, azotic gas, sulphates, muriate of soda, selenite, carbonate of lime siliceous earth, and a very small portion of oxide of iron (Guide 32). These properties probably gave the water a sulfuric aroma. As the opening of this chapter suggests, though, whether ill or healthy, the resort provided for all. For the healthy visitor, the prime activity was to consume in ways that are familiar to us: purchasing clothes or textiles, as Catherine learns to do from Mrs. Allen, window-shopping, and people-watching.

      These lines express Austen’s awareness of the period’s rapidly growing consumer market, resulting from an unprecedented growth in the middle class, which in turn increased demand for domestic and foreign goods. Purchasing power allowed Bath visitors to pay about one guinea a month for access to the warm spring waters served in the newly renovated Pump Room, and to provide a handsome gratuity to the pumper serving water from the King’s Springs .jpg) (Guide 38). But they would likely also be paying to imbibe other popular drinks, including tea, coffee, and chocolate, which albeit pricey were increasingly affordable to the growing middle-class (Selwyn 215). As any Austen fan knows, the Pump Room continues to serve tourists today. Although bathing is no longer allowed, tea, chocolate, coffee, and warm spring waters can still be imbibed.

      Walking the streets of Bath with Catherine as we read through Northanger Abbey’s first volume, we might keep in mind who teaches Catherine her consumer habits, and how the novel’s development may be commenting on these practices. We might also consider how the novel records a turning point in the consumption of natural remedies and other goods extracted from apparently distant communities and environments. How much do our current consumer habits differ from Catherine’s?

      Works Cited.

  5. Dec 2021
  6. Nov 2021
    1. LJS 418, f. 3r, the remnants of a sewing repair with thread remaining

      In parchment manuscripts one will often see small pin prick holes in the parchment which indicates that a hole in the animal skin was repaired during processing. Usually after curing and before use the thread from the repair is removed leaving only the small holes.

      Rarely, but occasionally, the thread will still remain in the final manuscript. An example of this is LJS 418, f 3r where one can see the thread left in the page.

    2. The smudged line indicating where the quire would have been originally folded is clear in the center of the folio.

      Smudged or worn lines on manuscripts may be indicative of a manuscript having been unbound and potentially folded and possibly carried during regular use.

      LJS 418 f. 6v shows an example of this pattern though the manuscript was later bound.

  7. Oct 2021
  8. Sep 2021
    1. Turn your Aeropress upside down (using the inverted method pictured below) so that the plunger is rested on your countertop and the brewing chamber is at the top.

      James didn't include a photo here, but oddly I've never thought of using my Aeropress upside down like this. I'll have to give a try this week.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9YnLFrM7Fs

      Good overview of what the marketing on a bag of coffee is trying to tell you.

      May be worth doing a quick sketchnotes version of this episode.

  9. Aug 2021
  10. Jul 2021
    1. How to Cold Brew: Using a standard 8 Cup French Press Add 4 Oz of coarse ground coffee to the bottom of the French Press. Pour 3 cups of cold or room temp water over the grounds gently. Gently stir to get all of the grounds wet. Let sit for 14-16 hours at room temperature. Press and strain into covered jar or vessel for storing your cold brew in your refrigerator. You now have a cold brew concentrate:  Mix 1 part coffee with 1 part water when serving.
    1. The Recipe I came up with a basic recipe for one cup of cold brew, which is as follows: Ingredients: 20 grams of coffee to 250 grams of water Measure out 20 grams of coffee. Grind to a medium-to-coarse setting. I chose the 24 setting on my Baratza Encore. Put 20 grams of ground coffee into your container. I chose a so-called "chilly bottle." A flask, a mason jar, or a cold brew coffee bottle would work fine too. Pour 250 grams of water into your container. Agitate the bottle to make sure grounds are incorporated into the water. I did this by moving the bottle around a bit (although not shaking the bottle). Put your container in the fridge. Wait 13 hours. You can experiment with the timing but 14 hours worked well for me. Take your coffee out and serve over ice in a glass.
  11. Aug 2020
  12. Nov 2019
  13. Jul 2019
    1. However, 24% of patients with PSC had never drunk coffee compared with 16% of controls (P < .05), and only 67% were current drinkers compared with 77% of controls (P < .05). Patients with PSC also consumed fewer lifetime cups per month (45 vs 47 for controls, P < .05) and spent a smaller percentage of their lifetime drinking coffee (46.6% vs 66.7% for controls, P < .05). These differences remained significant in a multivariate model. Among PSC patients with concurrent ulcerative colitis, coffee protected against proctocolectomy (hazard ratio, 0.34; P < .001).
    1. Mr Sette adds that while the world coffee industry sees revenues over $200bn each year, only $20bn reaches producing countries and ultimately, less than 10% of that reaches growers.

      Only a 1 penny of every dollar the coffee industry sees in revenue goes to the grower. What's wrong with this picture?

  14. Jan 2019
    1. while brains may be wired to seethe world, how and what is seen is never without a cultural component.

      In my research on coffee talks with Bosnian/Bosniak women, there's a (recent) story I came across in which a family of four (mom, dad, daughter, son) who are part of the diaspora living in America are visited by grandma, who grew up and continues to live in Bosnia. Upon arrival, the grandma witnesses American coffee culture first-hand when her daughter, son-in-law, and grandkids gather around the kitchen table one morning and drink their coffee -- which was made by a machine -- quickly and quietly before running off to work or school. She is deeply horrified -- offended even -- so much so that she shortens her trip from one month to a week. In Bosnia, what kind of coffee you drink, how you make it, who you drink it with, when, and for how long, what you talk about while drinking it -- these are all very significant things. In America, not so much.

    2. hese con-ditions are sedimented not solely in cultural narrative, ritual, and practice, but in howthey are made, accumulated, and enacted in (or through) material forms.

      I've been writing and researching about the coffee talks that Bosnian/Bosniak women partake in and how our particular coffee came to be, how and when it affected/s our minds/bodies, and how it allowed for the emergence of a women-only space designed to foster the exchange of information+women's experiences and hold together entire communities. Coffee, for Bosnian/Balkan women, worked by stabalizing networks, and ultimately stabilizing Yugoslavia (you know, before the men and the West kinda fucked things up a bit). My research is ethnographic, and Rickert's argument here comes off a little bit like that.

  15. Mar 2017
    1. Never Out of Season: How Having the Food We Want When We Want It Threatens Our Food Supply and Our Future, Copyright © 2017

      Would be very interesting to read this book.

  16. Jan 2017
    1. Whether you're a student, parent, or teacher, this book is your key to unlocking the aha! moments that make math click -- and learning enjoyable.

      You had me already at the Coffee Cup picture over the equations! :)

  17. Sep 2016
    1. Livestock has exceeded coffee in terms of its share of exports. Cattle are providing meat as well as leather. Colombia has the fourth highest cattle population in Latin America and is among the top 13 cattle producers in the world. Its beef industry is poised for further growth in the early 21st century. Beef, poultry, and pigs dominate the livestock industry.

      Livestock has done better than exporting coffee

  18. Apr 2016
    1. My friends here who started a micro-brewery tell stories that when they were starting, the other micro-breweries in the region did not seem them as a threat/competition, and in fact, offered advice, equipment, supplies. The people who do this stuff see it as a net gain for everyone if someone can help raise the regional interest in craft beer; if everyone grows more customers, everyone wins. It’s not a tech startup mentality.

      Craft beer is a fascinating world, partly because of this approach to sharing. Much of the so-called “Craft Beer Revolution” happened through homebrewers who were sharing tips and recipes online (not to mention ingredients and samples offline). The idea, in many an indie/craft scene, is that the out-group is the Mainstream. Very similar story among owners of Third Wave cafés. Of course, there are differences. But still… When you have a “common enemy” (Anheuser-Busch, Starbucks, McGraw-Hill…), it’s much easier to grow together.

  19. Nov 2013