19 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. Isabel: If things had gone a different way, and that moment that you describe hadn't happened, what do you think you would be doing, like what would be your dreams to do in the United States?Angelo: To have my store, to have my restaurants. I want my restaurant and I still want it.Isabel: What would you call it?Angelo: All styles, all around the world restaurant. That's what I want, all around the world restaurant. Something from every place. And that's what I wanted to, I want to travel the world, I want to learn every single style of cooking. I got Italian down, I got American style down, and I had a little bit of the London, English, all that. And I just want to keep learning, and I want to expand my portfolio, I want to learn as much as there is, and that's my dream one day to have my own store, maybe here in Mexico—most definitely here in Mexico because I really don't see any chances for me to go back.Isabel: So that's your plan for Mexico too, or your dream?Angelo: My dream to have my own store. That's my dream, that's my goal, to have my own restaurant, that's my passion. I love the reaction from the clients and I just love making good food.

      Reflections, Feelings, Dreams

    2. Isabel: And you said you became a chef—you started at Applebee's—can you tell me what the restaurant experience was like becoming a chef and moving around from there?Angelo: Well, when we first got to the U.S , my dad got into construction and so after a few years he got tired of that physically—it was very physically demanding—so he got into the restaurant. By the time I was 16, he had already had his status. He was a very good cook, so he brought me along. I was under his training from then on. I got that spark again, to want to do something, because I saw everybody, how they treated my dad, and literally just because I had his last name, it was, "Okay, you got the job." And my dad was at a very prestigious level to where many people would call him offering jobs or—Isabel: Your dad was undocumented as well?Angelo: Yes. When I saw that, I was like, "Okay, I might not be able to go to college, but maybe I could become a manager, maybe I could have my own kitchen, maybe I could have my own store, my own restaurant." And so being under my dad's training gave me that spark. I overpassed my dad, there were points after three years in a restaurant where I wasn't my dad's son anymore, I was my own person. I could go up to people and they would be like, "Yeah, I know who you are." At first it was all like, "Okay, who are you?" “Well, I'm ____ son.” “Oh wow. Okay, well here you go.” But then after a while it was, "Okay, well we need you because we've heard of you and we need you to pick our store back up." And so after that, that was my goal to have a restaurant, my own restaurant.Isabel: What was your favorite restaurant to work at?Angelo: That's very difficult, but I would probably say Applebee's just because that's where I started, and it just brings so much memories of me learning, me getting that experience, me burning myself a lot. And so yeah, that was probably the best time of my life, working at Applebee's.Isabel: Even though you went on to surpass your father?Angelo: [Affirmative noise].Isabel: It's really cool. So, you have kind of like this going…Start pursuing cooking and kind of earning that prestige or going after your father. But then you also mentioned that you're doing this because you had to support a family. Were you living with your baby's mother at the time? Were you together?Angelo: Well it was very difficult because at the age of 16, my father had legal problems. He ended up going away for, I would say, half a year-a little bit more than half a year. Throughout that time, there was a point where I had to basically become the man of the house. My mom doesn't drive, so I would take her to her job and I would bring her back. There was many times where I had to drive at three or four in the morning. So at the age of 16, I wanted to become that. I wanted to become that man of the house. And really that's the main reason why I had my baby, because I said, “I could do this, I want this, I want to be a father, and I'm going to be a father.”Angelo: And so, at the age of the age of 16, I moved out of my parents' house. After three months of working, I moved out of my parents' house, got my own apartment. And I ended up working two jobs at a time to be able to support my family and be on my own. After a while it was very difficult. So, there were plenty of times where we'd be on our own, and then something bad would happen financially, and so we'd go back to our parents' house. It was just basically on and off being on our own and not being able to make it.Isabel: So you said you were 16, so did you say you were older when you were renting a house or an apartment or anything that you'd pretend?Angelo: Yes, when I was 16, I had to get fake IDs, fake social security cards, and so that's how I got my apartment. Even 16, I looked older than what I was, so it was really no problem for me to apply for an apartment, or anything like that.Isabel: Did the restaurants that you would work with or the people there know that you were undocumented or that are younger?Angelo: No.Isabel: How old were you when you were becoming the chef?Angelo: 16.Isabel: That's incredible. I'm learning how to like... the other day I Googled how to cook chicken [Both laugh].Angelo: It was very difficult, but I wanted to do that. I saw my father, and I wanted to be him. I wanted to be him.Isabel: So, I'm just still trying to wrap my head around this. So, I know you started at Applebee's, but when you started at the last restaurant you work for, it was this like English, British kind of style. It's more on the other ends of the Applebee's spectrum?Angelo: Oh very.Isabel: Very much like more high end?Angelo: [Affirmative noise].Isabel: How old were you when you were a chef for that restaurant?Angelo: I was 20, 21 years old.Isabel: So that's kind of like where your career span…still so incredibly young. So how old did they think you were when you were working for them?Angelo: Then I could say I was 21.Isabel: Okay, so then that's fine.Angelo: Yeah.Isabel: That's enough credit.Angelo: Yeah, by then they knew who I was. There was points where I would get called in from other stores and they would tell me, “Leave where you're at and we'll give you $3 more.” Literally, I've never made minimum wage. And so that's basically how about how I got to $15.50 at the end. The reason I went to the British restaurant was because I was at Applebee's, and me and my dad would bump heads. He was the top chef, and I would also be considered the top chef. So whenever we would work shifts, it was all like, "Okay, so who's in charge?"Isabel: Literally too many cooks in the kitchen.Angelo: So that's when I said, "Okay, well I got to be on my own. I got to do my own thing.: And thank God I was able to do it. I put my mind to it and I got my name out there.

      Time in the US, Jobs/employment/work, occupations, chef, feelings, pride, dreams, excitement, hope

  2. Apr 2021
    1. Manifold – Building an Open Source Publishing Platform

      Zach Davis and Matthew Gold

      Re-watching after the conference.

      Manifold

      Use case of showing the process of making the book. The book as a start to finish project rather than just the end product.

      They built the platform while eating their own cooking (or at least doing so with nearby communities).

      Use for this as bookclubs. Embedable audio and video possibilities.

      Use case where people have put journals on the platform and they've grown to add meta data and features to work for that.

      They're allowing people to pull in social media pieces into the platform as well. Perhaps an opportunity to use Webmentions?

      They support epub.

      It can pull in Gutenberg texts.

      Jim Groom talks about the idea of almost using Manifold as an LMS in and of itself. Centering the text as the thing around which we're gathering.

      CUNY Editions of standard e-books with additional resources.Critical editions.

      Using simple tools like Google Docs and then ingest them into Manifold using a YAML file.

      TEI, LaTeX formats and strategies for pulling them in. (Are these actually supported? It wasn't clear.)

      Reclaim Cloud has a container that will run Manifold.

      Zach is a big believer in UX and design as the core of their product.

  3. Jan 2021
    1. On the other hand, in the process of roasting such polymeric compounds as melanoidins (which are potent antioxidants) and other compounds are formed.

      This is more evidence that cooking is neutral or positive, provided temperatures are not excessive. I doubt this would convince raw foodists, but it may.

    1. Recipe from Use soy-bean flour to save wheat, meat, and fat (Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of the Secretary, 1918). 

      I'm intrigued by wartime cookbooks. This is exactly the type of recipe I'm looking for. It looks versatile, cheap,and simple.

  4. Nov 2020
    1. Baobab Fruit Powder, Dried

      I was unable to find a study on baobab on diabetes or metabolic syndrome. However, given the effectiveness of amla, curcumin, and acai, it is likely effective. There is also some evidence for many other antioxidant sources, which backs up the idea that any source will do.

    2. Sumac Bran, Raw

      I've found one study on sumac for type 2 diabetes. There seems to be two separate write-ups on the same data.

      Oddly, 3 grams sumac did not perform as well as 3 grams amla. I can think of several possible explanations. The most likely explanation is that they used the whole grain rather than the bran. I assume the grain is what's used traditionally, but I'm having difficulty finding information about this. The bran has over 3 times the ORAC compared to the whole grain. It's likely that the bran is both hard to find and expensive.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. For Burger Patties8 ounces (225 grams) mushrooms 1 medium carrot 1 1/2 cups (85 grams) broccoli florets 1/4 medium onion 2 medium garlic cloves 2 tablespoons (30 grams) oil such as olive oil, avocado oil or grape seed, plus more for cooking 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon chili powder 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed 1/3 cup (35 grams) walnut halves (about 14 halves) 2 cups packed (85 grams) spinach leaves Handful tender fresh herbs like chives, parsley or cilantro (optional) 1/2 cup (100 grams) panko breadcrumbs 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon (15 grams) tomato paste 3/4 cup (115 grams) cooked brown rice Bread rolls, lettuce, tomato, cheese and favorite burger sauces

      Looks good. I will be using slightly crushed black.I'll use ground chickpea to thicken the water into a patty (along with the flax egg). I'll saok all ingredients in water for 24 hours. Then I'll remix and cook.

      I'll be cooking in a cylindrical contanter (inside pressure a cooker), then cutting it into burger slices. It will likely get stuck to the container, but I can't think of a surefire way to make it not stick given that it will start out as a soup that hardens. I could try a pre-cooked slice of something oily (such as oily bread, for example).Lining the bottom of the container with that could do the trick. I'll just cut around the sides, then pull out the cylinder.

      EDIT: I just realized I can use a cooking cylinder. It has no bottom, so I'd just have to lift it up, cut around the edge, and push it out. I'll make a thick sludge prior to cooking (by using flax), to minimize leakage. I'll place it inside a bowel with a small pool of oil. Even if it sticks, it won't matter because I can neatly tear or cut both dimensions (bottom and sides) without deforming my patty block.

    1. Ingredients10-12 oz. of tomato paste10-12 oz. of tomato paste1/8 - 1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar or white vinegar add 1/8 cup first - the full 1/3 makes a tangier ketchup (which we like). If you want more tang, add a little more at a time. White vinegar can also be used.1/8 - 1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar or white vinegar add 1/8 cup first - the full 1/3 makes a tangier ketchup (which we like). If you want more tang, add a little more at a time. White vinegar can also be used.1 tablespoon of sugar1 tablespoon of sugar1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon mustard powder1/2 teaspoon mustard powder1/2 teaspoon dried oregano1/2 teaspoon dried oregano1/2 teaspoon cayenne1/2 teaspoon cayenne1/2 teaspoon onion powder1/2 teaspoon onion powder1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder1/4 teaspoon celery salt1/4 teaspoon celery saltpinch of ground all spicepinch of ground all spice

      Tasty! I trippled the sweetener content to nearly match comercial ketchups (using erithritol, stevia extraxt, and monk fruit extract).

    1. Breads containing 30% and muffins containing 50% flaxseed were rated better than their counterparts regarding overall acceptability scores.

      That is a surprisingly high level. It's worth noting that 30% is the highest level tested in bread, so the highest level tested was the best. Given that they tested muffins up to 66%, it seems plausible that the 50% found optimal in muffins may also be optimal in bread.

    1. 1/4 cup (60 mL) ground flax3/4 cup (175 mL) warm water1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt2 tsp (10 mL) canola or flax oil1 3/4 cups (425 mL) all-purpose flour (approx)

      I calculate that that's a flax content of about 18 baker's percentage.

    1. The unique Umami characteristic of Dried Shiitake is Guanylate. This Umami component is created during the drying and rehydrating process, and not available in Fresh Shiitake.

      Interesting. This makes it likely that shiitake extract is the type of mushroom used in mushroom seasoning or takii. Most products just say "mushroom powder" and "mushroom extract". Some products list "shiitake powder" and "mushroom extract". I can find no product listing the type of extract used.

      Edit: The linked table shows dried shiitake has the highest guanylate and glutamate of the listed mushrooms. Given that the website is about umami generally, this dramatically increases the odds that it is shiitake extract used in said products. It implies that dried shiitake may be the most umami mushroom (though no other dried mushroom is listed).

  6. Feb 2020
  7. Nov 2019
  8. Nov 2016
  9. Mar 2016
    1. Plantains are higher in starch than bananas, low in sugar and is similar to a potato in texture. Plantains have similar nutritive value as fresh bananas plus vitamin A, and are an excellent source of carbohydrates, according to the University of Florida Extension. Plantains are also a good source of vitamin C and are low in sodium and calories.

      Plantains are high in starch and low in sugar, but they are just as good for you as bananas, plus they are healthier! I love them!

    2. Green plantains taste more like a potato with a starchy texture. Because of this, plantains are not suitable for eating raw unless they're very ripe,

      Plantains look like bananas, but they are more like potatoes. They are starchy, and like a potato, you would want to cook them first. I love cooking plantains!

  10. Jan 2016