775 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. annually:

      Look at this in context to see the breakdown.

    2. •Scholarly research and/or creative activity that extend and apply knowledge

      extends and applies knowledge

    3. at least the equivalent of five scholarly products within a five-year window

      minimum criteria

    4. Scholarly or creative work of high quality must be formally recognized by the faculty member’s peers to determine if it exerts influence in the discipline

      Peers "determine if it exerts influence in the discipline"

  2. Apr 2020
    1. There are many psychological, social, and institutional reasons why people don’t reuse stuff. But they are all academic questions until we solve the simpler problem: our software sucks at reuse. Like, if you had an evil plan to stop reuse and remix you would build exactly the software we have now. If you wanted to really slow down remix, you would build the World Wide Web as we know it now.
    2. Here’s how you currently reuse something in WordPress, for example. It’s a pretty horrific process. Log into the WordPress source site Open the file, go to the text editor. Select all the text, cntrl-c copy it. Go log into your target WordPress site Create a new page and name it. Go into the text editor, and paste the text in. Save Draft. Go back to the source site. Right click on the images in the post and download them. Go back to the target site. Open the Media Gallery and upload the images you just downloaded. Go through you new post on the target site, and replace the links pointing to the old images with links pointing to the images you just uploaded. Preview the site, do any final cleanup. Resize images if necessary. Check to make sure you didn’t pull in any weird styles that didn’t transfer (Damn you mso-!) Save and post. You’re done! Oh wait, you’re not done. Go to the source post and copy the URL. Try to find the author’s name on the page and remember it. Go to the bottom of your new “target” page and add attribution “Original Text by Jane Doe”. Select Jane Doe and paste in the hyperlink. Test the link. Now you’re REALLY done! It’s about an five to ten minute process per page, depending on the number of images that have to be ported.

      One of the things I love about the idea of using TiddlyWiki for OER. Drag, drop, done!

      Of course it would be nice if the metadata fields of Tiddlers included links to the permalinks of the original as well as their Creative Commons license.

    1. The purpose of recording and organising information is so that it can be used again. The value of recorded information is directly proportional to the ease with which it can be re-used.The philosophy of tiddlers is that we maximise the possibilities for re-use by slicing information up into the smallest semantically meaningful units with rich modelling of relationships between them. Then we use aggregation and composition to weave the fragments together to present narrative stories.TiddlyWiki aspires to provide an algebra for tiddlers, a concise way of expressing and exploring the relationships between items of information.

      This also seems like a great underlying philosophy for open educational resources.

  3. Mar 2020
    1. https://guides.library.utoronto.ca/c.php?g=448614&p=3199145

      Librarians are masters at finding material and checking copyright. This is what we do and what we've done for years but most of us really don't have an understanding of what is OER and how it can be used. As librarians continue to be in forefront of this movement, we need to be educated with language we understand so we can interpret it to those we serve. This source gives an indepth interpretation in librarian-understandable language

    1. el nacimiento de verdaderas comunidades de práctica de docentes que comparten recursos educativos digitales de libre acceso y uso ha sido tan impredecible que ya se habla de un movimiento. La filosofía es muy parecida a la que vio nacer el software de código abierto: todos ganan si los recursos existentes se mejoran sucesivamente gracias al intercambio constante

      La infraestructura tecnológica requiere de contenidos y no se esta en la capacidad de crear todos los que se requieren, ni en todos los casos esta la opción de comprar.

    1. OER Commons is a public digital library of open educational resources. Explore, create, and collaborate with educators around the world to improve curriculum.

      This Open Educational Resource page hosts free resources from educators who work with preschool children all the way through graduate and professional level adult learners. In addition to full classroom activities, the site includes many mini-activities and continued learning resources that instructors can include in their daily instructional practice. Although it would certainly require an investment of time on the part of an educator, one of the primary reasons technology integration is not considered, this site does provide the means by which educators may begin to consider including technology in their curriculum to the benefit of their students. Ranking: 8/10

    1. MERLOT Materials

      Started in 1997 by the University of California Center for Distributed Learning, this website offers free, peer reviewed, digital learning resources for learners as young as preschool to adult learners in graduate or professional learning programs. Educators can use a general search tool or a filter to find open resource learning material with a peer/editor review and often a user review. This is a very practical, although somewhat overwhelming, approach to putting digitally-designed learning materials into the hands of educators of all ages. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ntegrating Technology in Learning

      This website offers a host of resources for youth and adult educators who are looking for new ways to incorporate technology into their educational environment. The website stores featured projects that support technology integration, resources that educators can use to inform their own practice, and short articles on a variety of topics for youth and adult learners as well as professional development programs. Ranking: 7/10

    1. How do you feel about writing in books?

      We welcome you to share your own answers to this question! (Opens in new window.)

      Below are participant responses to the survey questions.

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  4. Feb 2020
  5. Jan 2020
    1. Publishers are eager to please state policymakers of both parties, during a challenging time for the business. Schools are transitioning to digital materials. And with the ease of internet research, many teachers say they prefer to curate their own primary-source materials online.

      Here's where OER textbooks might help to make some change. If free materials with less input from politicians and more input from educators were available. But then this pushes the onus down to a different level with different political aspirations. I have to think that taking the politicization of these decisions at a state level would have to help.

    1. Black artists and cultural leaders have been compiling documents of this sort since the 1700s, first as part of an ongoing argument against White supremacy and slavery. Later, during Reconstruction, as a reminder to the newly literate Black population “that they were not alone.” Later still, to catalog the abundance of the Harlem Renaissance

      I'd love to have copies of these lists. Or perhaps even an anthology of works that appear on them?

      Perhaps it would be useful to publish an entire series of these works under a bigger banner? Perhaps an OER edition that could be shared?

  6. Dec 2019
    1. Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial

      I'm gearing up my reading list for the holidays. I wanted to add An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris. Seemingly I can only find .html, .azw3, and .pdf copies of the book, and I'd far prefer an .epub version. Fortunately the book has a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0), so I've spent some time this morning to convert an original and made myself an .epub version for my Android devices.

      I'm happy to share it if others are looking for the same and don't have the ability (or frankly the time) to make the conversion. I also have a .mobi version (for Kindle) of the text as well since it didn't require much additional work. These are exact replicas with no changes and come with the same CC BY-NC 4.0 license. If Jesse or Sean want copies to make available on their site, I'm happy to send them along. 

      If you have the means, please be sure to make a donation to help support the book and Sean and Jesse's work.

      Originally posted at https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/19/alternate-formats-of-an-urgency-of-teachers-by-jesse-stommel-and-sean-michael-morris/

    1. Further Research (in html)

      • Distribute a survey to library workers to elicit criteria for OA content selection, including quality measures and financial workflow components.
      • Research appropriate levels of collective action — local, state, regional, national, international? What is the tipping point between large enough to exert market force and too large to manage? What is the role of consortia in leading collective action efforts?
      • Propose and test innovative staffing and workflow changes to meet the needs of an open environment.
      • Research the power and agency of the library community with respect to OA content support: ○ Would community criteria, decision-making, or vetting be widely adopted? ○ How is best to consider needs in relation to the diversity of institutional participants and scale of effort? ○ How can the community leverage market power in an equitable and ethical way?
      • Create generous spaces and build a common vocabulary, within the library profession and with content providers.
      • Expand conversations about these topics to include other stakeholders (OA providers, consortia, agencies, societies, faculty and scholars, administrators, etc.)
      • Explore the connection between OER and OA programs. Are there ways to use the momentum from OER programs to develop stronger OA content platforms or services?
  7. Nov 2019
    1. this commercial publisher

      Notice that once they changed the business model they ceased being productive.

    2. Because you didn’t change the instructional design of the book in any way

      But by changing the license you now enable the book to be remixed and adapted to the needs of the students: an open license enables open pedagogy.

    3. I see four groups who are trying to use OER to solve closely related – but ultimately very different – problems: The negative impact on access to education caused by the high price of traditional learning materials The negative impact on student success caused by limitations in the traditional publishing model The negative impact on pedagogy caused by copyright-related constraints inherent in traditional learning materials The negative impact on students caused by a wide range of behaviors related to the business models of traditional publishers (If you use OER and don’t see yourself in one of these groups, what problem are you trying to solve by using OER?)
    1. Wiley’s (2013) notion of “renewable assignments,”

      I thought the term "renewable" as opposed to "disposable" came up later. The word "renewable" does not appear in David's 2013 blog post cited here.

    2. We define OER-enabled pedagogy as the set of teaching and learning practices that are only possible or practical in the context of the 5R permissions which are characteristic of OER.

      Definition of "OER enabled pedagogy".

    3. Those interested in OER care about the way the word “open” is used in educational contexts.

      Sure. And others also care about the way open is used in educational contexts beyond OER, to mean more than just specific copyright statuses.

    1. A large part of the ‘resources’ conversation in OER is this kind of problem. Cheaper access to books. More people using books. Nice measurable problems that can be fixed.

      Lowering costs for learning materials via OER: A complicated problem vs what Dave calls complex problems, like open pedagogies.

    1. It’s a turbulent time for the college textbook industry. Low student enrollment, tight company budgets and changing business plans have hampered growth at major educational publishers such as Pearson, Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education.

      The Inside Higher ED provides resources on news, adult learning, and technology advances. They provide information on online learning environments. This is deemed useful as online education is becoming popular. One of the articles I found was the alternative to textbooks. Publishers are jumping on board to creating custom textbooks at lower prices. The market is changing and moving to open educational resources. Publishers plan to invest more in their digital courseware. 3/5

    1. Of course the Open Education conference is just an open education conference and it certainly isn’t the only place to have these conversations. Regional events such as the Northeast OER Summit, the Cascadia Open Education Summit, Wisconsin’s E-ffordability Summit, the Statewide Colorado OER conference and others are wonderful options. Further afield, the OER conference and the Open Education Global conference are both events that welcome critical conversations. As do other events like Digital Pedagogy Lab and the many virtual conference hallway conversations facilitated by Virtually Connecting.

      Nice list of open education and OER related conferences and communities.

    1. CARE Framework

      Thanks to @mkcow below for providing a direct link to the CARE Framework.

  8. Oct 2019
    1. “When we call anything “open” we need to clarify: What are we opening, how are we opening it, for whom, and why?”

      Good and necessary questions

    1. money

      Whose money? Important to determine whether the student or the institution is the winner here. Are we increasing access to high quality resources? I think the answer is yes, but I think it also bears thinking about.

      Another type of savings to consider: the technical debt that students of all ages incur when they encounter a new technology that may or may not be well supported. If OER is trapped inside proprietary technologies with unique logins, it's worth considering how many of those resources we ask students to grapple with over the course of a degree.

    2. make the teaching and learning problems caused by copyright the core issue we are solving with OER

      I still wonder to what degree open educational practices are necessarily or always tied to copyright. That is, can OEP be implemented on copyrighted texts?

    3. Project Management for Instructional Designers

      Ironically this book is licensed "non-commercial." I personally like that license but after years of folks arguing against that license, I would love to hear the rationale behind it.

    1. I launched the open textbook project over a summer, and because I teach at a public university where I had no easy access to graduate assistants or funding,

      I think that this is one of the biggest barrier for changing course materials; if our institutions are not supplying incentives to faculty, what are creative ways to effectively promote OER to faculty?

    1. Cengage’s own research forecast that the use of OER as primary courseware was poised to triple within five years.

      Useful info, which I'm not above using.

    1. a range of business models

      I think Hypothes.is plays a very important role in democratising these discussions. The real places where these decisions are made are often closed off to faculty and students. We need to have serious discussions about which sustainability models are appropriate for education not just the businesses. What is sustainable for education may not always be sustainable for business!

  9. Sep 2019
    1. Notably, several of the catalysts identified by participants were not directly related to an awareness of OER or open textbooks. Several of these catalysts are related to innovation, learner empowerment, and increasing access to knowledge more generally. While these individuals identified as open education practitioners, they did not necessarily cite OER as their starting point for integrating openness in teaching and learning.

      This is an interesting conclusion as it has oft been stated that OER are a gateway to OEP. While that appears to be the case for 3 of the participants, for the rest it appears that OER was not the starting point to OEP. What bears deeper investigation is whether the second or third step to OEP was OER. Reminds me of a blog post I wrote a few years back wondering if OEP required OER http://clintlalonde.net/2017/02/04/does-open-pedagogy-require-oer/

    2. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    3. Thomas further commented “it’s openness in what we bring into the classroom, openness in what we take out of the classroom, and an openness between what happens between the students and myself and the students and each other in how we organise the classroom.”

      Great quote

    4. Alice noted her feeling that the use and sharing of OER were one of the “less threatening” components of OEP.

      This is an important change in perception that has occurred in the past 10-15 years of OER. OER's used to be met with much skepticism by faculty. It is nice to see that these are now becoming "less threatening" and, by extension, more accessible.

    1. The Task Annotation Project in Science (TAPS) provides K-12 educators with annotated assessment tasks, aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards, that help guide teachers in more equitably monitoring their students’ learning.37 Osmosis is a repository of open educational resources (OER) created to crowdsource the future of medical education.38 Undergraduate and graduate medical students have access to thousands of digital resources, and they have also used annotation - through comments, feedback forms, and ratings - to improve the quality of these learning materials.39 The National Science Digital Library (NSDL), created in 2000, is an archive of open access teaching and learning resources for learners of all ages across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines.40 Annotation has been used to tag the NSDL’s resources and improve information accessibility, support student interaction with multimedia content through a digital notebook, and educators have annotated NSDL resources to design online learning activities for their students.41 And research about the digital annotation tool Perusall.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }3Troy Hicks, Nate Angell, Jeremy Dean, often used in conjunction with science textbooks, has shown that college students’ pre-reading and annotation practices can subsequently improve exam performance.
    1. One notable barrier that has prevented faculty from adopting OER is concerns about the quality of the materials. The present study extends upon a growing body of research indicating that OER are not perceived to be lower in quality than traditional textbooks.

      I have trouble believing many faculty members will be swayed by undergraduate students' perceptions of quality. There's a difference to be explored in "quality of disciplinary content in the abstract" vs. "quality as a study aid for this particular course."

      This is of course a broader concern for advocacy for OERs, not a critique of this particular study.

    2. One reason why the students assigned open textbooks may use those textbooks more is that they perceive a greater need for/relevance of their textbook relative to those assigned traditional textbooks

      The absence of the teacher here seems like an issue. To what extent may the students have come up with that perception on their own, or might they perceive it because the teacher told them about the work involved in vetting this particular textbook? What, if anything, did the traditional textbook teachers say?

      (Further down the paragraph it's made clear that the OERs were adapted to be more relevant, which I agree is part of the attraction of OERs and including that is fair. But I'd still like to know what the teachers said in class about it, if anything.)

    3. and students assigned an open textbook reported a significantly higher percentage of underutilized textbooks (M = 52.20, SE = 1.38) than those assigned a traditional textbook (M = 48.44, SE = 1.21)

      Students who have been primed with the knowledge that this course uses a lower-cost OER text are more critical of textbook price vs use in other courses?

  10. Jul 2019
    1. “My professor shows us slides, but, um, the book is not used at all, and that’s a book that I bought for $200, and that, even though I’m not using it the price is going to go down. I mean, it’s unwrapped, so that right there takes away its value.” — 2nd year student at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

      To me the vast part of the problem is that students assume a "required" textbook is actually required. It doesn't take much work or thought after even the first semester of Freshman year to realize this fallacy. Students need to learn the fine art of choosing their own textbooks. More on this: https://boffosocko.com/2011/07/30/on-choosing-your-own-textbooks/

    2. My professor shows us slides, but, um, the book is not used at all

      The student's description of the course reminds me that conversations about OER go hand-in-hand with conversations about pedagogy. How does adopting and (co)creating OER texts affect the how's and why's of teaching and learning? And for instructors (and students) new to OER, how can they receive support before, during, and after the use/creation of an OER text?

    1. Open Education Resources OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license permitting their free use or re-purposing by others Much of the challenge in identifying ownership is due to the fact that it is hard to differentiate between who is the user and who is the producer when it comes to open learning in the classroom.

    2. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.

    1. 1)

      As I reflect on how instructors and students might co-create an OER text, I see questions like this, generated by the instructor/author, as an opportunity to establish and explore essential questions together. After brainstorming these questions, a possible next step would challenge students to write their own chapter (or other unit) in response to this question.

  11. Jun 2019
    1. I love the way you're thinking about design and pedagogy here. It makes me want to think more about possibilities for such design...I'm wondering what the startup effort would be for many teachers...

    2. Elsewhere, I use GitHub to facilitate multi-stage written assignments. Students are asked to revise an earlier written assignment, responding to instructor feedback, and to create a record of their revisions in their commit history to the earlier submitted document.

      This is an interesting idea. I've done similar things with Juxta, but I can see how Github would be a great tool for this...how much effort goes into teaching the tool?

    3. There is no lesson plan or outline we must read in order to enact an educational experience; instead, the website lets us have an educational experience right away and then lends itself to a series of follow-up questions, exercises, and reflective practices. Otherwise put, the website actively facilitates a pedagogical experience rather than providing access to pedagogical documents. There is no set up required.

      This is an interesting comment. I'm struck by the notion that the site enacts the learning process rather than provides materials. I'm also wondering how this might fit into the "open education" ethos.

  12. May 2019
    1. Despite popular rhetoric along the lines of “you can’t learn from materials you can’t afford,” their rather ingenious experiment showed that increasing access to learning materials by adopting OER instead of traditionally copyrighted resources (TCM) will almost never measurably improve learning. Learning will only improve measurably if you ALSO do something else.

      OMG YES!!!!!

    2. This was justified by the fact that there is a lack of empirical evidence to support expanding the use of OER.
    1. We need to emphasize program consolidation where appropriate, in order to direct more resources to high-demand programs such as computer science and education.  In addition, the Board’s Open Education Resources initiative will provide textbooks for certain courses at little or no cost.

      Ease tuition hike with free textbooks?

  13. Apr 2019
    1. The example of the Linux kernel shows that this is completely possible.

      I think the Linux kernel analogy breaks down even more in considering "the other 93%" of educational content, which David has already identified here as more niche, less kernelesque, than content for core courses. Seems to me, the more specialized and rarely used something is — either in digital technology or in content — the less likely it is going to be the focus of widespread, shared activity.

      If commercial publishers could rely on OER content for core classes and generate revenue from wrapping them in additional services (as David describes here), what is their incentive to devote any resources to labor-intensive, niche content that would have far lower revenue margins?

    2. Traditional textbook content like words and images are just like the operating system kernel – kind of boring.

      This is the part of the argument here I don't find convincing. I'm not sure we can liken content — yes even "traditional textbook content" — to OS kernels or roads as a kind of "boring" infrastructure. Content is an expression of knowledges/understandings right? If anything, content seems more like the "interesting" part that relies on the kernels/roads.

      Yet I am interested in the idea of thinking of content as PUBLIC infrastructure, in the sense that like roads, we have common interests in securing public sources for the resources necessary to produce and maintain educational content.

  14. Mar 2019
    1. We refer to this idea as the access hypothesis.

      In thinking about the questions I’m raising in my presentation at OLC Innovate 2019, let's start by asking the question whether we think the "access hypothesis" is a significant component in measuring the impact of OER on student learning?

    1. But often — and maybe even usually — when we complain about the cost of books, we’re complaining about the cost of supplemental media, password-protected websites, and other items that may include text but are certainly not books.

      And at the same time, OER’s lack of such ancillary materials is often blamed for its slow adoption.

    2. By teaching students to expect that books ought to be free, we are teaching them to be bad citizens.

      Point taken. Maybe the lesson is not about the price of books, but who should pay for them. A lot of course materials are produced in factory-like conditions by underpaid creators who have no intellectual property rights in the works they produce.

    3. a holdover

      I love the word for these types of anachronisms: skeumorph.

  15. Feb 2019
  16. quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com
    1. Why an HTML/CSS First Approach Works for #OER and why #OER Must Work for an HTML First Approach

      I'm in strong support of an HTML-first approach for both humans and OER. Great stuff Greg! Love the offline, non-digital learning activities!

    2. For too long the field of #OER has simply been a field studying itself. We debate what is open and what is not. What is a resource what is pedagogy...and is that pedagogy really praxis....

      I don't really get this opinion, or how it pertains to Greg's otherwise important point about the format of OER. Seems like it ignores BOTH the great many tangible contributions folks have made in the field of OER AND the very important conversations that also take place around topics as or more important than technical formats, like pedagogy, and the socio-economic ecosystem in which OER participates.

    1. We propose a different motivation structure for OER adoption. Our plan is to give some of the estimated yearly savings from OER use to the department, our teaching and learning center, and our library (5 percent/2.5 percent/2.5 percent, respectively). As an example, if a biology course enrolls 1,000 students per year, and the typical text savings would be $100 per student, adoption might save students $100,000 per year. Providing even 5 percent of the projected savings from OER adoption directly to the department as flexible money would be highly motivating to many departments; the teaching center and library are incentivized to support adoption and access. Although the savings from such a plan would accrue to the students, the retention of even one or two additional students due to better textbook usage by the students would, from an institutional perspective, pay for such an initiative. And, particularly for public universities, controlling cost, increasing access and enhancing success align with our mission.

      An amazing incentive that drives kickback to departments, not individuals.

    1. Do

      I like that most of these focus on process…as opposed to product. I still think they need to be revisited and remixed to capture my earlier note.

      Also thinking about issues of ownership, sharing, and IP online. This would call in a need for CC-licensing, open learning, OER, etc.

  17. Jan 2019
    1. The immense value of NOT “achieving a useful consensus” around what we mean by “open” and staying in that deeply interesting conversation is precisely because when we foreclose it, when we leave it, we miss out on new understandings for ourselves, and close them down for others. It’s no surprise that some women with very different global perspectives, like Maha and Sarah Lambert (whose paper “Changing our (Dis)Course: A Distinctive Social Justice Aligned Definition of Open Education” inspired Maha to write today) would remind me why we need to keep definitions of open, open.

      This paragraph is a core part of the main point I was trying to convey in this post. I was trying to celebrate respect for/comfort with/the value of ambiguity/messiness/"the other" in the term "open pedagogy" that the closed term "OER-enabled pedagogy" wasn't invented to support. As Maha Bali put it differently (better?) in part of a tweet about how truly open discourse might have: "Respect for the 'other' ... that does not reciprocate that respect. Comfort with ambiguity and messiness the 'other' does not have."

    1. Nate Angell has made similar comments in the past

      Read more about how I wasn't thinking about techno-determinism.

    2. Others will doubtless continue this deeply interesting conversation and I wish them well as they do – I am in no way criticizing them as I withdraw from these conversations.

      But no hard feelings.

    3. I’m convinced that the terms “open pedagogy” and “open educational practices” are understood so differently by so many people that there is literally no hope of achieving a useful consensus about the meaning of either of these terms. Some definitions are centered on OER. Some are centered on the public, linkable nature of the “open web.” Some are centered on social justice. Some are centered on collaboration. Some are centered on innovation. Some are centered on learner empowerment. Some are exercises in the permutations of these. There have even been arguments made that a clear definition would somehow be antithetical to the ideal of open. As I said, there appears to be no consensus coming for the meaning of either of these terms. For my own personal purposes of writing, researching, and advocating, the absence of a shared understanding of these terms removes any utility I previously hoped they had. Consequently, I don’t think I’ll use these terms any longer or participate in the discussion about their meanings going forward.

      David abandons debates about open practices/pedagogy.

    4. We learn by the things we do.

      Something everyone in the open education community might agree on.

    5. All of the activities that we associate with knowledge creation and other forms of scholarship are remix activities. They involve standing on the shoulders of giants, whether remixing existing knowledge in novel ways or combining previous understanding with genuinely new insight. Everything is a remix on one level or another.

      All knowledge production is a remix.

    1. Opening the Textbook: Open Education Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2017

      great collection of reports from babson

    1. Design Justice: towards an intersectional feminist framework for design theory and practice

      Design is key to our collective liberation, but most design processes today reproduce inequalities structured by what Black feminist scholars call the matrix of domination. Intersecting inequalities are manifest at all levels of the design process. This paper builds upon the Design Justice Principles, developed by an emerging network of designers and community organizers, to propose a working definition of design justice: Design justice is a field of theory and practice that is concerned with how the design of objects and systems influences the distribution of risks, harms, and benefits among various groups of people. Design justice focuses on the ways that design reproduces, is reproduced by, and/or challenges the matrix of domination (white supremacy, heteropatriarchy, capitalism, and settler colonialism). Design justice is also a growing social movement that aims to ensure a more equitable distribution of design’s benefits and burdens; fair and meaningful participation in design decisions; and recognition of community based design traditions, knowledge, and practices.

    1. A Social Justice Framework for Understanding Open Educational Resources and Practices in the Global South

      Abstract: At the heart of the open educational resources (OER) movement is the intention to provide affordable access to culturally relevant education to all. This imperative could be described as a desire to provide education in a manner consistent with social justice which, according to Fraser (2005), is understood as “parity of participation”. Drawing on her concept of social justice, we suggest a slight modification of Fraser’s framework for critically analysing ways in which the adoption and impact of OER and their undergirding open educational practices (OEP) might be considered socially just. We then provide illustrative examples from the cross-regional Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project (2014-2017) to show how this framework can assist in determining in what ways, if at all, the adoption of OER and enactment of OEP have responded to economic inequalities, cultural inequities and political exclusions in education. Furthermore, we employ Fraser’s (2005) concepts to identify whether these social changes are either “affirmative” (i.e., ameliorative) or “transformative” in their economic, cultural and political effects in the Global South education context.

  18. Dec 2018
    1. Inflation-adjusted Textbook Pain Multiplier for Decision-Makers

      Analysis and solutions to better convey the economic impact of rising textbook costs.

  19. Nov 2018
    1. How do I listen to a podcast?Rajiv Jhangiani shares about critical open pedagogy on episode 226 of the Teaching in Hig

      Well presented, thoughtful look at OER in high ed. Great resource links.

    1. OER matters not because textbooks matter. OER matters because it highlights an example of how something central to our public missions, the transfer of our foundational disciplinary knowledge from one generation of scholars to the next, has been co-opted by private profit. And OER is not a solution, but a systemic shift from private to public architecture in how we deliver learning.

      I love this framing of OER as public infrastructure to facilitate the transfer of knowledge. I think it is not only generational, but also more broadly to the public. OER use is not limited to just students within our institutions, but are available freely and openly more broadly to the public. To anyone. I think we need to make that point more widely known. Every OER that is made freely available is making knowledge more open to not only students in our institutions, but to anyone, anywhere. It truly is "public" infrastructure.

  20. Oct 2018
    1. Universal education is now widely viewed as one of the basic requirements for a modern society and it serves as a chief catalyst for socio-economic and personal development.
    1. OER is an equity strategy for higher education: providing all students with access to course materials on the first day of class serves to level the academic playing field in course settings

      OER and equity

    1. "The study indicates that, based on two years of implementation across scores of colleges, OER can be an important tool in helping more students — and particularly low-income and underrepresented students — afford college, engage actively in their learning, persist in their studies and ultimately complete,"
    1. We can involve students in the process of curating content for courses, either by offering them limited choices between different texts or by offering them solid time to curate a future unit more or less on their own (or in a group) as a research project.

      Content is a process, not a product.

  21. Sep 2018
    1. One concrete example of combining constructionism and openness into OER-enabled pedagogy is Wiley's (2013) notion of "renewable assignments," which he contrasts with "disposable assignments."

      I don't see "renewable assignments" mentioned in Wiley's 2013 work.

    2. We define OER-enabled pedagogy as the set of teaching and learning practices that are only possible or practical in the context of the 5R permissions which are characteristic of OER.

      Definition of "OER-enabled pedagogy".

    3. Defining OER-Enabled Pedagogy

    1. Within the context of this study, OER refer to free, open textbooks, which replaced previously adopted expensive, traditional, commercial textb

      suggests that OERs replace traditional textbooks or purchased resources, thus is there any relationship to any pedagogical change related to the use of OERs?

    1. “The survey’s results should be a wake-up call for everybody involved in higher education. This is especially true for the publishing industry, including our own company, as we historically contributed to the problem of college affordability,”

      Cengage Survey

    1. While each tool has differing ways in which it can be used in the classroom and with various Learning Management Systems (LMSs),

      What's the relationship between the LMS and OER or perhaps more specifically "open educational practices"?

    2. Between publishers' higher costs of textbooks and students' struggle with large amounts of reading materials, getting students to both access and engage more deeply with texts is a challenge.

      Two challenges that #OER and #annotation together can provide infrastructure to help solve: the high cost of learning materials and engaging teachers and learners in social reading, discussion and analysis.

      Issues to solve: both OER and annotation don't require digital reading, but are both made more powerful through it. Yet technology access and reading preferences don't always support to digital reading.

      Solution: Explore online and offline, digital and print experiments in OER and annotation/social reading.

    1. Not only is the notion that OER-sustainability is the responsibility of the end-user pragmatically unnecessary, it also places barriers to adoption that will inhibit rather than encourage future use.

      This is certainly true. It reminds me of the early historical growth of the Catholic church. Paul of Tarses came in and relaxed the dietary restrictions and the need for circumcision which effectively lowered the barrier for entry into the church. One needn't be a Jew to be a follower of Jesus; this helped early growth tremendously.

  22. Aug 2018
    1. YouTube Lectures by Kevin

      If you hold down the CMD or CTRL key while clicking the video links, the video will open up in a new tab. Otherwise, when you go "back" to the book from the video, you'll be sent back to the beginning of the book. Not great.

    1. A key difference between inclusive access and buying print textbooks is that students effectively lease the content for the duration of their course, rather than owning the material. If students want to download the content to access it beyond the duration of their course, there is often an additional fee.

      So now we need to revisit the calculation above and put this new piece of data into the model.

      Seriously?! It's now a "rental price"?

    2. Students like the convenience of the system, said Anderson, and all have access to the most up-to-date content, instead of some students having different editions of the same textbook.

      They're also touting the most up-to-date content here, when it's an open secret that for the majority of textbooks don't really change that much from edition to edition.

    3. She said that her institution, which has inclusive-access agreements with more than 25 publishers, had saved students more than $2 million this semester alone.

      $ 2million compared to what? To everyone having purchased the textbooks at going rates before? This is a false comparison because not everyone bought new in the first place. Many bought used, and many more still probably either pirated, borrowed from a friend, from the library, or simply went without.

    1. OER initiative

      I wonder how a trend towards OER initiatives will change the landscape of for-profit edtech solutions and how they already have