70 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Dec 2018
    1. I think only the philistine mind thinks that art needs a social or moral justification.

      Quote of the year.

    2. Academics will probably bristle at this thought but, at least in relation to literature, all you have to do is look at the courses that are offered featuring the literatures of other countries. Not only don’t they teach these literatures, they don’t read them.

      We certainly could use an Anthony Bourdain of literature to help peel back the curtain on other countries and cultures.

    1. Camilla's youth

      Camilla is the young protagonist of the 18th century Frances Burney novel by the same name.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camilla_(Burney_novel)

  3. Nov 2018
    1. This was a time when I was starting to think about what my career was going to be. I’d failed to make it as a musician. I’d had lots of appointments with A&R people. After two seconds, they’d say, It’s not going to happen, man. So I thought I’d have a go at a radio play.  Then, almost by accident, I came across a little advertisement for a creative-writing M.A. taught by Malcolm Bradbury at the University of East Anglia. Today it’s a famous course, but in those days it was a laughable idea, alarmingly American. I discovered subsequently that it hadn’t run the previous year because not enough people had applied. Somebody told me Ian McEwan had done it a decade before. I thought he was the most exciting young writer around at that point. But the primary attraction was that I could go back to university for a year, fully funded by the government, and at the end I would only have to submit a thirty-page work of fiction. I sent the radio play to Malcolm Bradbury along with my application.  I was slightly taken aback when I was accepted, because it suddenly became real. I thought, these writers are going to scrutinize my work and it’s going to be humiliating. Somebody told me about a cottage for rent in the middle of nowhere in Cornwall that had previously been used as a rehabilitation place for drug addicts. I called up and said, I need a place for one month because I’ve got to teach myself to write. And that’s what I did that summer of 1979. It was the first time I really thought about the structure of a short story. I spent ages figuring out things like viewpoint, how you tell the story, and so on. At the end I had two stories to show, so I felt more secure.
  4. Sep 2018
    1. Isaiah 55.8: “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord.” And also that [in] Psalm 37.5: “Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass.”

      Focusing on the specific word "way", Jesus Christ states in the book of John "Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." John 14:6. It seems to me that Mary is finding comfort or "revival" within these specific verses because they have to do with submission of one's human will to that of God's will.

    1. Mine eyes have seen

      "Mine eyes have seen" is a phrase that comes up numerous times throughout scripture (Luke 3:20) and it is also in the popular hymn, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, "Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord" A song which evokes a lot of faith and patriotism for many Americans

    2. Down I sat, with my heart as full as it could hold, and yet so hungry that I could not sit neither; but going out to see what I could find, and walking among the trees, I found six acorns, and two chestnuts, which were some refreshment to me.

      Again, hunger comes up. Mary speaks of both the need for nourishment both physically and spiritually.

  5. Jul 2018
    1. Remember that although many movies are not as good from an academic perspective as the literature they are based on, one of your objectives is to get them interested in that literature.

      The conflation of scripts and novels in this article is close to malpractice. Plays should ALWAYS be studied in performance. Most scripts are not meant to be read; they are meant to be produced. (There are, of course, many ways to study plays in production, including but not limited to watching a movie, and they all involve reading the script.)

  6. Jun 2018
  7. sites.google.com sites.google.com
    1. May 31: Lecture 6 / Screencast Video Link

      Literature Review

    1. Share: Group. Only group members will be able to view this annotation. Only me. No one else will be able to view this annotation.

      I have reviewed many papers and I summarized those papers in my paper in the form of a table which is already an existing theory . So how can I defend that my paper is different from other papers?

  8. Apr 2018
    1. The fundamental circumstance of our lost paradisewas that human beings were the centre and beneficiaries of a bounteous andbenevolent nature, unperturbed by changes of season or extremes of tem-perature, fed and clothed by plants and animals who existed to provide fortheir necessities

      This is very thought provoking for me. For as long as I could remember I saw mankind as a species that sucks the life out of everything good pure or anything with natural beauty. Although, there are many wonderful things mankind can accomplish when we work together. A perfect example would be building a bridge or building. Take Rome for example. For thousands of years mankind has proven themselves more than enough, demonstrating that the impossible can be possible if you just put your mind to it.

    1. Orlandowasawoman--LordPalmerstonhadjustprovedit.Andwhenwearewritingthelifeofawoman,wemay,itisagreed,waiveourdemandforaction,andsubstituteloveinstead.Love,thepoethassaid,iswoman'swholeexistence.AndifwelookforamomentatOrlandowritingathertable,wemustadmitthatneverwasthereawomanmorefittedforthatcalling.Surely,sincesheisawoman,andabeautifulwoman

      I found this to be interesting because the subject of love is said to be a feminine topic. Action related literature is seen as masculine. I thought it was ironic because most of Orlando's life was spent thinking about love and pining over a heartbreak, a well as feeling the pressure to get married. I think the tie between the gender female and literature about love is proven by Orlando's need to get married(tingling finger). I also think there's reason to say that Orlando had perhaps always had feminine qualities since she had always thought about love and perhaps didn't write about it since she was a male(?)

  9. Feb 2018
    1. Allthings, therefore, which are as they ought to be, are conformed unto thissecond law eternal,

      This is the most overthought piece of information I have ever read in one passage, and for Richard Hooker to be able to discuss the ideas of the laws of ecclesiastical polity entirely amazes me. I still feel like no matter how much you analyse the text you would have a hard time coming to your conclusion.

  10. Dec 2017
  11. Nov 2017
    1. A stamp in the passport, Portrait, a place I must visit without ever feeling it necessary to return, though I might want to wander out now and then to drop in on Joyce’s poetry, roughly contemporary with the first novel, those curious “pomes,” wearing their spats and dandyish nosegays, occasionally taking up a putative lute to croon promises of theoretical love to unconvincing maidens in the windows of canvas-flat donjons.

      This is relevant.

    1. Barry, D. (1991). Managing the bossless team: Lessons in distributed leadership. Organizational Dynamics, 21, 31–47.Bennis, W., & Townsend, R. (1995). Reinventing leadership: Strategies to empower the organisation. New York, NY: Harper Collins.Wellins, R., Byham, W., & Wilson, J. (1993). Empowered teams: Creating self-directed work groups that improve quality, productivity, and participation. Hoboken, NJ: Jossey Bass.
  12. Sep 2017
  13. May 2017
    1. The reason we don’t know Dutch literature over here, according to Zwagerman, is because they barely know it themselves. The Dutch language has been in such constant flux over the past few centuries, he writes, that “many great works of 17th- and 18th- and 19th-century Dutch literature have to be translated into modern Dutch to make them accessible to the average reader”. Laurence Sterne? Jane Austen? Charlotte Brontë ? Imagine them all lost to us!
  14. Apr 2017
    1. As Martha Stoddard Holmes suggests, nineteenth-century thinkers were among the first to see disability as a cause of individual suffering, which has the problematic consequence of minimizing “the importance of the material circumstances that surround all disabilities” while maximizing “the importance of personal agency while minimizing the need for social change” (Fictions of Affliction 28-9).

      This part of the article stands out to me for a number of reasons. First, the idea that people with physical and mental disabilities prior to the nineteenth century suffered in a difference sense compared to what they deal with now. Prior to this point, this introduction points out the stereotypes that people with disabilities had in the eighteenth century. Though this is something that is still socially dealt with now, we've taken further measures to help people who deal with specific setbacks that emphasis the overall point on maximizing "the importance of personal agency," and minimizing social change. Overall, this article interests me because it allows me to think deeper about how disabilities have always existed, though they've been handles in a variety of different ways as well as reflect it to how it's handled regarding circumstances we've learned including the role of the doctor and what they can do to help and the resources we had access to then versus now.

    1. p. 99

      About the usefulness of requests for information as a way of finding grey literature (anthropologist quoted on page).

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  15. Mar 2017
    1. paraph

      An additional flourish on the signature, to make it more distinct and personal. I've been pretty lost for the past 5 pages, but I do like this signature metaphor. We sign things nearly as often as people in the 20th Century did, but we've gotten a lot sloppier thanks to shoddy e-signing on credit card machines. Still, I can look at my signatures and identify them as mine, even though there's no master-signature for me to compare them against. There's a scene in the novel The Talented Mr. Ripley where the bank investigating the disappearance of Tom Ripley does a signature analysis of his recent checks, but they underestimate how long Dickey's been impersonating Tom, so that they're comparing those checks against earlier forgeries.

    1. we can see how readily realism leads into symbolism. For the succession of scenes both re-alistically reflects the course of the action and symbolizes it

      I'm quite fond of this line. First, it addresses the usual rejection of the symbolic in fiction that you get from people about books and movies, but second, it really gets to blurring divides, in fiction and reality, that I see a lot of with Burke's later takes on literature/poetics and rhetoric.

      It also includes a pun that makes this unnecessarily confusing, which is just so apt.

    1. It is as though we were to maintain that I apples are healthy because6 wise people eat them, instead of recognizing that it is the other way about-that it is what the food will do for us which makes us eat it, not the fact that we eat it which makes it good food.

      @sophist_monster

      "polite literature" and buying a car simply for the snob value as opposed to buying it because it is good

  16. Feb 2017
    1. Whately picks up the domi-nant trends of the day

      Would you like something to read?

      Do you have anything light?

      Uhh... how 'bout this leaflet polite literature?

      Yes, thank you.

    2. Under this pressure from both sides toward independent development. rhetoric and belles \cures split. In 1828, a chair of English literature was e$lablished at London University; in 1845, Edinburgh separated rhetoric and literature; in I 876, Johns Hopkins and Harvard did the same; and in 1904, laggard Cambridge followed. By the end of the century, a further split had occurred in the United States: Speech depart· mcnts had formed, taking the elocution course and the study of rhetoric with them.

      I think about this split quite often. As someone with two degrees largely focused on literature, and seeking one focused on rhetoric, I find myself lost in the (messy and often blurred) boundaries between the two fields. The later assertion from Mill, "For poetry, utterance is the end, not, as in rhetoric, the means to an end" (996) seems to hold true even today. Literature is rarely seen as social action, let alone socially engaged. I wonder how damaging (or not) this is as we attempt to think about "our disciplinary identity crisis less as a crisis of identity and more as an opening of alterity" (Muckelbauer).

      This is probably why I am so intrigued by Muckelbauer's argument that "we might even conceive of rhetoric as, in a certain way, disengaging from the entire problematic of 'fields,' disconnecting from both 'interdisciplinary studies' and work in the 'rhetoric of x' genre (indicating, perhaps, an ontological rhetoric)."

      But what does this look like? How does this happen? The end of this intro seem to give some hope -- "Literary theorists, too, began to acknowledge...the wider scope afforded by a rhetorical approach to discourse" (998, emphasis mine). But how often is literature viewed as discourse? And is this a reciprocal engagement?

    1. (his right hand was broken in a brawl at a meeting in Indiana and never healed prop· erly),

      One of the things I note with embodied rhetoric is that Douglass and the abolitionists weren't the first movement to face physical violence for their beliefs, but they were a movement where physical violence could not be distanced from their advocacy. Douglass not only uses his scars as a rhetorical tool, that scarring is significant to the construction of his own identity. I'm looking to Harriet Wilson's Our Nig, particularly at the end where the protagonist, Frado, contrasts herself against her husband, a fugitive slave who's touring the abolitionist lecture circuit, and notes his "back showed no marks of the lash, erect as if it never crouched beneath a burden." The scars of slavery aren't just a demonstration of his condition, they're a part of how his identity was formed.

    1. ollow the crowd blindly. :I'w-, "'•'" ,_"i"'i.A t¼i

      I find this change in car consumerism, in Britain, accurately portrays both the dangers of blindly following the crowd (PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE just watch for a few minutes, or until 34:05 (only 5 1/2mins), and why Polite Literature is simply a fad for a lower class to "get ahead," or gain some air or exclusivity.

    1. take strong aim at the heart of the reader.

      sentimentalism defined

    2. sentimentalilsm figured as "tak[ing] strong aim at the heart of the reader" (i)

  17. Jan 2017
  18. Nov 2016
    1. Literature

      On what is this literature list based ? I would find a short explanation useful, that makes it transparent (Maybe as an "i" icon behind it). For example, if it's based on a PubMed search with keywords x,y,z I can be sure that I don't have to complement my literature search from here with a search on PubMed.

  19. Sep 2016
  20. Jun 2016
  21. screen.oxfordjournals.org screen.oxfordjournals.org
    1. his problem is both theoretical and practical. If we wishto publish the complete works of Nietzsche, for example, where dowe draw the line? Certainly, everything must be published, but canwe agree on what 'everything' means? We will, of course, includeeverything that Nietzsche himself published, along with the draftsof his works, his plans for aphorisms, his marginal notations andcorrections. But what if, in a notebook filled with aphorisms, wefind a reference, a reminder of an appointment, an address, or alaundry bill, should this be included in his works? Why not? T

      How to define literature: again, a difference to science. It would never occur to us to confuse a scientists scientific work from all other writing, because the category is so clear; but literature is a more amorphous term.

  22. May 2016
  23. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. Catherine then ran directly upstairs, and watched Miss Thorpe’s progress down the street from the drawing–room window; admired the graceful spirit of her walk, the fashionable air of her figure and dress; and felt grateful, as well she might, for the chance which had procured her such a friend.

      Here Austen is having Catherine admiring Isabella because of her charm that she possesses to her move up in society. She can see here how Isabella uses her appearance to win over people not to mention her manners. It brings up the thought of why there were so many balls during this time period. What was expected of women? The balls that Austen describes seem to be more like debutante ball. A Debutante ball is when younger women are brought into society so they can meet eligible men to marry but also be seen as ladies.

    2. If the heroine of one novel be not patronized by the heroine of another, from whom can she expect protection and regard? I cannot approve of it. Let us leave it to the reviewers to abuse such effusions of fancy at their leisure, and over every new novel to talk in threadbare strains of the trash with which the press now groans.

      Austen writes Catherine to be one of those readers who gets so engrossed with what she is reading that she becomes sucked into that world. She loses her sense of what is really going on in her own reality. But also here she reads way too much into a heroine in a novel. Webster’s 2 Dictionary defines are heroine as “the principal female character in literacy work or dramatic presentation”. To contrast that Merriam Webster defines it at “a woman who is admired for great or brave acts or fine qualities”. Which one could fine Catherine as a heroine or even excel her expectations of a heroine in what she reads into?

      Work Cited: Webster’s 2 Dictionary

    3. Belinda

      A novel by Maria Edgeworth. She was born in Blackbourton, England (1767) and sadly passed in Edgeworthstown, Ireland (1849). The novel Belinda was considered scandalous due to the topic of interracial marriage being brought into the storyline.

    4. Camilla

      A novel by Francis Burney. The novel was published in 1796. The novel is about Camilla is seen as a gothic romance due to the themes of misunderstandings going a long with trying to find love with a theme of uncanny.

      Work cited: http://www.britannica.com/biography/Fanny-Burney

    5. Cecilia

      A novel by Francis Burney who was not only a novelist but also wrote letters. She was born in England King’s Lynn England (1752) and sadly passed in London England (1840). Her novel Celica was published in 1782. The novel depicts about a young woman who wants to move up in society and along the way falls in love with an older socialite.

      Work Cited http://www.britannica.com/biography/Fanny-Burney

  24. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. Nobody can fasten themselves on the notice of one, without injuring the rights of the other. I consider a country–dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principal duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or marry themselves, have no business with the partners or wives of their neighbours.”

      I feel as though this quote says a lot about the how relationships were built in that time period but also in this story. Not only that but how the roles were set for men and woman. The man is so be the leader and the woman fallows. I do find it an interesting comparison with marriage being seen as dancing. In this example would you say Catherine and Mr. Tilney are dancing around each other?

  25. Jan 2016
    1. I think The Winnower has found a nice niche publishing what is called “grey literature.” (i.e. we publish content that is not traditionally afforded a platform).  By focusing on this niche in the in the short term (<5years) we can build a community that will allows us to experiment with different models in the long term (>5Years).  I found out very early after launch of The Winnower—it’s not enough to build a platform around a new model, you have to convey the value to the community and really incentivize people to use it.
  26. Dec 2015
    1. And though I was grateful to James for calling them out, I wasn’t even challenging anyone’s access to making money. I just made humorous remarks about some books and some dead writers’ characters. These guys were apparently so upset and so convinced that the existence of my opinions and voice menaced others’ rights. Guys: censorship is when the authorities repress a work of art, not when someone dislikes it.
    2. art can also help us fail at empathy if it sequesters us in the Boring Old Fortress of Magnificent Me.

      Art is powerful. It shapes minds. It thereby shapes the world -- or keeps it the same -- for good or evil.

    1. As part of EFF’s 25th Anniversary celebrations, we are releasing “Pwning Tomorrow: Stories from the Electronic Frontier,” an anthology of speculative fiction from more than 20 authors, including Bruce Sterling, Lauren Beukes, Cory Doctorow, and Charlie Jane Anders. To get the ebook, you can make an optional contribution to support EFF’s work, or you can download it at no cost. We're releasing the ebook under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivatives 4.0 International license, which permits sharing among users. 
  27. Nov 2015
    1. The Eternaut is a particularly compelling work, and it occupies an interesting point in Latin American literature. While Latin American literature is mostly associated with magical realism—Borges, Márquez, that sort of thing—Oesterheld’s writing is less fantastical and more pulp-inflected.
  28. Oct 2015
    1. He began writing a program to make it play draughts (checkers), inspired by a June 1950 article in Penguin Science News.

      It's not insignificant that Strachey began by creating a game before his experiences with combinatory literature. I think that the poetics of the game are an intrinsic part of digital literature. I think it's useful to use Espen Aarseths' terminology of "user" in place of "reader" in order for one to talk about "games" and "books" in the same breath.

    1. Well the definition of e-lit is quite determined in this sentence. - However in order to get used to this saavy app (hypothesis platform) I'm going to descrive with my own words what I got from this definition-

      Apparently e-lit has to do with the literary aspects and connections made between several interactions of liteature and technology (for what I get, standard books may also apply here) where sometimes it may ne regaldless of human intervention.

      Also, I think this has to do with the "computing" devices, within mechanisms and systems that may be also the way we as humans construct reallity and other things though language and literature. This reminds me of some Foucault's theory about how a single word may be considered as a discoursive device in a complex mechanism interacting with several systems in a society o so...

      What's really interesting is that the human intervention may not be required after all to consider the creation and acknowledgment of a literary work.

    2. The confrontation with technology at the level of creation is what distinguishes electronic literature from, for example, e-books, digitized versions of print works, and other products of print authors “going digital.”

      Confrontation with technology as a way to elaborate and create literature differs widelly from just using tecnological devices to display literature.

    1. literary works created with the use of a computer for the electronic medium such that they cannot be experienced in any meaningful way without the mediation of an electronic device

      According to this definition, a script even though typed is not e-lit but movie made out of it, is e-lit. A book on Harry Potter (even an e-book) is not e-lit but the movie surely is...Have I interpreted this correctly?

    2. such that they cannot be experienced in any meaningful way without the mediation of an electronic device

      By adding the absolute word "cannot" (though softened perhaps a bit by adding "meaningful way"), this seems a narrower definition than the previous one, which I'm fine with.

      BTW, if this e-lit course is held a second time, you'll have to find new pages to annotate, as these ones have already slowed to a crawl with all the multiple highlights over the same text. I hope the devs of Hypothes.is are watching!

    1. (diskettes sold by mail order)

      So not only were these early e-lit efforts probably created using non-open software, they were distributed using now-obsolete physical media? I hope someone somewhere has backed them all up to modern formats and media.

    1. samplereality

      Adding text to a highlight makes it a note (and gives you the chance to make it public), whereas highlights default to private I think).

    2. bookmarklet

      This is a note - I'm not 100% sure what the difference is between notes and highlighting, yet, since we can add comments to notes and notes generate highlights?

    3. Hypothes.is lets you annotate the web

      Test

  29. Sep 2015
    1. This is a really interesting article about many Latin American intellectuals' opinions on the possibility of Catalonian independence from Spain. Many are urging Cataluña to stay a part of Spain because Barcelona has historically been a city that Latin American intellectuals have lived and worked in and they don't want to lose those cultural ties if Cataluña severs its ties with Spain thus abandoning castellano. The other portion of this article that stood out for me was the quote by Abad which argued that Europe has been doing the right thing by not yielding to every nationalistgroup because that only leads to violence and probelems (I assume he's referring to the case of Latin America here).

  30. Jul 2015
    1. or rather the progress of those Americans who believe that they are white,

      This is such a powerful articulation--borrowed from Baldwin as the epigraph makes clear--of the social construct of whiteness.

    2. the gap between her world and the world for which I had been summoned to speak.

      A riff on the title of TNC's forthcoming book, itself a a riff on WEB Du Bois's famous description of black experience in The Souls of Black Folk (1903). As he opens that book in a chapter entitled "Of Our Spiritual Strivings":

      BETWEEN me and the other world there is ever an unasked question: unasked by some through feelings of delicacy; by others through the difficulty of rightly framing it. All, nevertheless, flutter round it.

    3. JUL 4, 2015

      Hard not to relate this piece to another great statement of African American experience: Frederick Douglass's 1841 speech “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

      Image Description

  31. May 2015
    1. undetermined momentousness

      Such an ambivalent phrase. The narrator seems to be claiming that this is a "moment" unparalleled in its significance. Yet this significance is "undetermined"; it remains unclear exactly how the moment is significant.

  32. Feb 2015
    1. Do you remember the day, baby, you drove me from your door?

      A line from Elvie Thomas's "Motherless Child Blues":

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmj23UrVF80

      The trope of the motherless child is a popular one in African American art. Of course the destruction of families was a major consequence of the slave trade and the institution of slavery.

  33. Jan 2014
    1. a China Miéville novel called The City & the City. It’s about two cities that literally overlap in geography, with the residents of each completely ignoring the other — and any violations, or breaches, of that separation are quickly enforced by a shadowy organization known as the Breach.