25 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. The Studio curriculum in the Learning, Design, and Technology (formerly Instructional Technology) program at a large research-extensive university in the southeastern U.S. represents a deliberate application of contemporary theory of how adults learn complex information in ill-structured domains. The Studio curriculum, part of a graduate program leading to a master’s degree, has been implemented since 1998 to prepare professionals to design, develop, evaluate, and manage educational multimedia. Theoretical considerations played a major role in shaping the design of the Studio curriculum. Prominent among these were constructionism, situated cognition/situated learning, and self-directed learning. Important related theoretical constructs included scaffolding and flow theory. This paper describes the Studio learning environment, presents these theoretical concepts, and discusses the application of theory to practice in the training of adults in instructional design and development (IDD).

      This peer reviewed research article conducted by two University of Georgia researchers aims to assess the effectiveness of constructionist-centered “The Studio” curriculum within the Learning, Design, and Technology program. The method is used is reviewing design of the curriculum, the learning environment, theoretical concepts, and review of application methods. The research review is helpful in identifying how the constructionist-based, collaborative model is designed and implemented in contrast to the one-course/one-instructor model. In addition, the article outlines the general practices and framework for design under the constructionist learning theory. (Rating: 5/10)

  2. Aug 2019
  3. Feb 2019
    1. books of rhetoric which abound in the world,

      How many copies of Blair's Lectures (62 editions, 51 abridgments, and 10 translations) did he stumble across? (see Rhetorical Tradition Enlightenment intro)

    1. Hugh Blair and George Campbell,

      Key players in shaping rhetoric and university curriculum in the 18th and 19th centuries (Cf. James Berlin's account of composition instruction in American universities)

  4. Nov 2018
    1. Prezi is a productivity platform that allows for creation, organization, collaboration of presentations. It can be used with either mobile or desktop. Prezi integrates with slack and salesforce. RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Towards teaching as design: Exploring the interplay between full-lifecycle learning design tooling and Teacher Professional Development.

      This article explores the theory of training teachers as learning designers to promote innovate and creativity. Included in the article are studies of designers with little teaching experience compared with those that are full-cycle teachers and the effect of TPD and LD upon training.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. The Moodle project

      Moodle is one of the largest open source collaborative platform used in the development of curriculum.

      Moodle is an Australian company and has various levels of subscriptions including one level for free. Overall I have found the site to be user friendly rich with demos, documentation and support including community forums. This site supports multiple languages and has an easy to use drop down menu for that selection.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  5. Jan 2018
    1. it also required elusive buy-in from administrators and a new approach to thinking about the classroom experience.

      There are benefits and drawbacks to such modern learning spaces. On one hand, the space(s) being used for technological advancement need to be designated, built/remodeled and shown to be used regularly by students, this process takes a long time and a lot of funding to perfect, which is what administration do not want to hear. Such spaces do not have to be used only for online courses and studying, which is a point made later in this article, it can be versatile and useful for all students if designed right. As technology improves, educators with more training in technology are becoming more widespread and students utilize online resources and technology more, the necessity of having these spaces increases.

  6. Oct 2017
    1. The objects of this primary education determine its character & limits. These objects would be,

      The goals that are listed below basically are to make the university students a successful and contributing member of society. However this is quite contradictory because they are still kinda of teaching that the white race is superior than the black race. This may not be taught explicitly but it is already integrated into the minds of the teachers and the students that it comes out anyway. They failing even though they think they are not.

  7. Sep 2017
  8. Apr 2017
    1. A curriculum without strong consensus makes no sense.”

      Radical change will be uncomfortable. If we don't push for change, we will spend another decade becoming less relevant.

  9. Nov 2016
    1. learning enabled by technology

      So often we are thinking the other way around: How can I find a parallel in technology that would give youth an experience in learning similar to what they get in the classroom? I actually this is a great way to begin to design learning experiences for student, and what we find is that we sometimes end up with even richer materials and wider/deeper connections with others when we move enable learning with technology. Still starting with what works without the tech makes sense often.

    1. The liberal arts teach us to act toward others with humility and respect because we recognize there are multiple ways to look at the world. 

      I could not agree more, but we also need to think about how precisely our curriculum is cultivating habits of respect, empathy, and humility. What specific courses facilitate these virtues, what sorts of assignments ensure they are practiced?

  10. May 2016
    1. writing across the curriculum, critical thinking, and active learning, Bean (2011)

      Good source for "Writing across the Curriculum"

    1. curriculum of wide-awakeness

      First blush: do these words belong together? Curriculum and wide-awakeness? When I think of curriculum, I think of a track that I am running in, that the rules do not allow variance, that is pre-set and pre-determined. Wide-awakeness seems to be opposed. Perhaps as the terms are defined my thoughts will change.

  11. Apr 2016
  12. Aug 2015
  13. Jul 2015
    1. Back then all I could do was measure these freedom-lovers by what I knew. Which is to say, I measured them against children pulling out in the 7-Eleven parking lot, against parents wielding extension cords, and the threatening intonations of armed black gangs saying, “Yeah, nigger, what’s up now?” I judged them against the country I knew, which had acquired the land through murder and tamed it under slavery, against the country whose armies fanned out across the world to extend their dominion.

      I wonder if curriculum like this http://youthvoices.net/blacklivesmatter makes similar mistakes.

    2. Back then all I could do was measure these freedom-lovers by what I knew. Which is to say, I measured them against children pulling out in the 7-Eleven parking lot, against parents wielding extension cords, and the threatening intonations of armed black gangs saying, “Yeah, nigger, what’s up now?” I judged them against the country I knew, which had acquired the land through murder and tamed it under slavery, against the country whose armies fanned out across the world to extend their dominion.

      I wonder if our "BlackLivesMatter" curriculum sometimes makes the same mistakes. http://youthvoices.net/blacklivesmatter

    3. I write you in your 15th year. I am writing you because this was the year you saw Eric Garner choked to death for selling cigarettes; because you know now that Renisha McBride was shot for seeking help, that John Crawford was shot down for browsing in a department store. And you have seen men in uniform drive by and murder Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old child whom they were oath-bound to protect.

      This is what we need in our teaching with other 15 year olds. In our curriculum, do we have a strand... maybe a stance... a readiness... an ill-formed set of prompts... an inquiry at the ready... that also says: We are teaching http://youthvoices.net/blacklivesmatter (as one example -- thank you Renée Watson) because this was that year that you saw...

    4. the week you learned that the killers of Michael Brown would go free

      I read this paragraph three times, blinking back tears. Moments like this get collected by many (not all) of our students. It's amazing to ask them, to give them space -- perhaps a little information -- to tell their own memories of these weeks. There's something here for curriculum, for teasing out the memories of our students over the past years. And asking them what these stories mean to them, and asking them to use writing to remember and to make meaning of these moments. That's how anti-racist education with African-American and Latino youth is different.

    1. While I’d struggle to tell you how I learn best, there is one question that I’d always be able to answer enthusiastically: What would you like to learn next? Right now I’m learning JavaScript and have plans to give Spanish another go. I should probably pick up those guitar lessons again soon as well. Thankfully we live in a time when it’s trivially easy to gain access to resources and to learning activities. The problem is finding out the ones that work best for you. Perhaps that’s why we carry around in our pockets devices that can access pretty much the sum total of human knowledge yet use them to LOL at amusing pictures of cats. What are the barriers here? I’d suggest there are three main ones: 1 Curriculum - the series of activities that build towards a learning goal 2 Credentials - the ability to show what you know 3 Community - the cohort of peers you feel you are part of, along with access to ‘experts’

      How do I learn best? What resources are the best ones for me?

  14. Jun 2015
    1. The kind of work assigned thus makes a big difference. If students have only been asked to write in one mode or to one type of audience (or no audience except the implied teacher as audience), their portfolios will provide less opportunity to find direction.

      This is real, and perhaps, a bit understated. When students are doing worksheets, filling in blanks, how can we ask them use them for self-expression (sonnet), self-reflection (mirror) or for making a plan (map).

      But then, does this mean that we have to spend more time on creating conditions and projects for meaningful work before working on portfolios? Probably not, but this does remind me of how much gets revealed because of portfolios.

      Seeing what's not there yet -- in our own curriculum -- is a big reason why teachers resist student portfolios, I think.