58 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2019
    1. While 100% of Irked's graphics were ripped from VEXED, Irked contains 90+% new code. Only the levels and the loop that evaluates blocks for removal were taken directly from VEXED.
  2. May 2019
    1. Procedural Rhetoric. Bogost, I. In Persuasive games: the expressive power of videogames, pages 1–64. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2007.

      "...the rhetoric of failure. Tragedy in games tends to find its procedural representation in this trope." (85)

      "Political video games in the sense I have articulated above are characterized by procedural rhetorics that expose the logic of a political order, thereby opening a possibility for its support, interrogation, or disruption. Procedural rhetorics articulate the way political structures organize their daily practice; they describe the way a system “thinks” before it thinks about anything in particular." (90)

      In thinking through This War of Mine, I'm interested in the notion that the game is designed to thwart winning, and indeed every choice the player makes bring them closer to survival or to morally bankrupt behavior or both. In many moments of the game's narrative, there are no good choices. In some play-throughs I have felt better allowing my characters to die than I have with exercising the power at my disposal, e.g. killing and robbing the old couple. And in a strange way, my characters seem to feel more comfortable with that choice, too. TWoM seems to fall somewhere in between Kabul Kaboom and traditional winnable games.

  3. Apr 2019
    1. Playing games with my brother taught me that connections can be made with another person through virtual reality. Things like cooperation, shared problem-solving, and communication in gaming can strengthen relationships. Most importantly, gaming taught me that no matter the differences between me and another person, we can find common ground through play.
  4. Mar 2019
    1. Simulations and games in informal learning contexts This article seems to discuss science learning, which is not my foremost interest, but it does give an example of how informal online learning can be used to allow the learner to explore his or her own interests. It is not specific enough to be of high value but is useful as a preliminary reading that can perhaps inform search terms to use for future research. rting 2/5

  5. www.training-games.com www.training-games.com
    1. This six-page PDF includes a list of 40 icebreakers that can be used to help learners get to know each other at the beginning of a session. Items included in this list are largely relevant to face-to-face training. The explanations are brief and may help visitors come up with their own ideas. Rating 2/5

    1. This page is associated with Thiagi's interactive lectures, which are characterized in a book that is available via this site. This particular page involves links to types of interaction, such as games, puzzles, and so forth. It would be better to read or review the book, but since that option is not available, I will provide a link here. rating 2/5

  6. Feb 2019
    1. Skill Gaming – Mind Sharpening or Time Wasting?

      Trend watchers suggest that its growth is four times the speed of growth in internet use itself. If this trend continues unabated they'll be more people playing skill games.

  7. Jan 2019
    1. ideas

      Watching this reminded me of a horror game I used to watch playthroughs of back in the day. Aqua Regia was used as a component to create acid at one point in the game. Thinking about it now, there were a lot of alchemy elements to that game... Go google Amnesia: The Dark Descent for a good time (and jumpscares lol)

    1. many psychologists simply accept an operational definition of intelligence by spelling out the procedures they use to measure it. . . . Thus, by selecting items for an intelligence test, a psychologist is saying in a direct way, “This is what I mean by intelligence.” A test that measures memory, reasoning, and verbal fluency offers a very different definition of intelligence than one that measures strength of grip, shoe size, hunting skills, or the person’s best Candy Crush mobile game score. (p. 290)

      Ironically, there is research showing that video game performance is positively correlated with intelligence test scores (e.g., Angeles Quiroga et al., 2015; Foroughi, Serraino, Parasuraman, & Boehm-Davis, 2016).

      Not every inaccurate statement in the textbooks was as silly as this one. Readers would benefit from browsing Supplemental File 2, which

  8. Nov 2018
    1. the fact that bodies like the Wellcome Trust exist is an indication of the power games can have

      Games are the only entertainment medium right now that aren't showing any sign of an expiration date. Most people don't pay for music and movies anymore, and most social media sites go in and out of popularity. Games, however, have never lost popularity, there's always going to be another kid turning 10 that'll want a play-station for Christmas. Therefore, it is games that are the best method for education or to highlight political issues.

  9. Oct 2018
    1. with recursive rnd_move(move) as ( select *, random() rnd from generate_series(1, 9) move ), winning_positions(a, b, c) as ( values (1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9), -- rows (1, 4, 7), (2, 5, 8), (3, 6, 9), -- cols (1, 5, 9), (3, 5, 7) -- diagonals ), game as ( select 'O' as who_next, ARRAY['.', '.', '.', '.', '.', '.', '.', '.', '.'] as board union ( select case when who_next = 'X' then 'O' else 'X' end as who_next, board[:move-1] || who_next || board[move+1:] from game, rnd_move where board[move] = '.' order by rnd limit 1 ) ), game_with_winner as ( select *, lag(a is not null) over () as finished, lag(who_next) over () as who from game left join winning_positions on board[a] != '.' and board[a] = board[b] and board[a] = board[c] ) select array_to_string(board[1:3] || chr(10) || board[4:6] || chr(10) || board[7:9] || chr(10), '') board, case when a is not null then who || ' wins' end as winner from game_with_winner where not finished;
  10. Jul 2018
    1. In Chile, the Rosas et al. study (2003) evaluated the effects of introducingeducational video games into the classroom and found indications ofpositive effects on learning, motivation and classroom dynamics.

      Good publication to look at research studies proving OCC and video game creations and educational tools were beneficial to classrooms

  11. May 2018
    1. pools at quadrille

      Quadrille, according to David Parlett was a wildly popular card game of the period. "A notable characteristic of Quadrille is that it was always more popular with women than with men." The pool is the main stake of each round, like the collected bets in poker.

      Historic Card Games described by David Parlett

    1. fish

      “A small flat piece of bone or ivory used instead of money or for keeping account in games of chance; sometimes made in the form of a fish” (OED).

      Fish made from ivory (Austenonly.com):

      Other shapes, made of mother-of-pearl (Austenonly.com):

  12. Apr 2018
    1. cassino

      Also spelled casino; "a card game for two to four people" (Pool, What Jane Austen Ate…, 281).

    2. quadrille

      "A card game played by four people with forty cards that was the fashionable predecessor of whist" (Pool, What Jane Austen Ate…, 360).

  13. Mar 2018
    1. FIDUSPAWN

      see: pokemon, digimon, beyblade, any other early 00's or late 90's 'mon.

  14. Nov 2017
  15. Sep 2017
  16. www.youthvoices.live www.youthvoices.live
    1. The rest of the hobbies were either self taught or taught by my past teachers. In terms of gaming, I have taken part of many different Alpha, Beta, and Common Tests for various games from World of Warcraft to War Thunder.

      May I say that being able to test the different levels of game during it's production is pretty cool. I do enjoy being able to test games via GameJolt. To see the potential people have. Recently I've played and checked a game called Alaska (I think). A game being made by only one man and so far it is only I'm quite sure Alpha. It's doing quite well so far and looks like it has quite a bit of potential.

  17. Aug 2017
    1. The apparent legal threats that took down these paid hacking tools can be seen as a similar method to fix the game's cheating problem through non-technial means. And while keeping hackers out is important to the interests of fair play, GTA Online's use of microtransactions means hacks that can generate infinite in-game money impact a market that's reportedly worth half a billion dollars to Take Two.

      Hack is everywhere, GTA's case shows how online game hacks can directly cause a big amount of loss of money. Not only economic loss, the impression of the game on players are also worsened. So we can see for huge online game, it is super urgent to minimize cheating as much as possible.

    1. Cheating also appears to be infectious. The likelihood of a fair player becoming labelled as a cheater in future is directly correlated with this person’s number of friends who are cheaters. So if you know cheaters you are more likely to become one yourself. Cheating spreads like flu through this community.

      Infectiousness is cheating's another property, also the most bothering thing about cheating. Since cheating is infectious and people are easy affected by cheaters around them, cheating seems to be a unsolvable issue.

    2. Their idea is to use the structure of the network to predict the likelihood that a given player will become a cheat in future. In other words, the number of friends who are cheats determine how likely this player is to becoming infected with the ‘cheating virus’ in future, so to speak. They say they expect to do more work on this in future.

      This idea sounds reasonable, but still kind of ridiculous. Just because a player meets many cheaters, does not mean he or she is going to be a cheater under that influence. In this case, they cannot let those honest players take responsibilities.

    3. So gaming communities invest significant resources into finding and stopping cheaters. In the Steam Community, for instance, which has some 30 million users, cheats are clearly labelled so that other users can see them and so that servers can prevent them playing games from which they are banned (although they can play other games).

      The cheating issue has drawn a lot of attentions of game companies, they have been investing lots of resources on catching and limiting cheaters.

  18. May 2017
    1. rubber

      According to the OED, rubber refers to "A set of games (usually three or five), the last of which is played to decide between the opponents when each has won an equal number; (hence) the winning of more than half the individual games by one side" (OED).

      This phrase altogether indicates that Lady Middleton was partaking in a card game upon hearing the news of Marianne.

    1. Lady Middleton proposed a rubber of casino to the others.

      "A set of games (usually three or five), the last of which is played to decide between the opponents when each has won an equal number; (hence) the winning of more than half the individual games by one side. Also in early use: †the final decisive game (obs.)" (OED).

      "Casino first appears in the card game literature at the end of the eighteenth century in London, and shortly afterwards in Germany" ... "The aim in Casino is to capture cards from a layout of face up cards on the table. A card is captured by playing a matching card from hand. It is also possible to capture several cards at once if their values add up to the value of the card played" (John McLeod, Casino, page 1).

    2. consequences

      "A round game, in which a narrative of the meeting of a lady and a gentleman, their conversation, and the ensuing ‘consequences’, is concocted by the contribution of a name or fact by each of the players, in ignorance of what has been contributed by the others" (OED).

    1. Video Game History Foundation is racing to preserve ephemeral gaming material and the physical documentation of video games.

      Would love to go to a museum like this!

  19. Apr 2017
    1. Shortly after this im-age was released, the modem environmentalist movement in the United States began

      James Lovelock's Gaia Hypothesis originated slightly before 1967, but he was working for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, so in many ways, he already was working off a mental image of the Earth seen from the outside.

      Sidenote, but I first encountered the Gaia Hypothesis because the game SimEarth (which is built around modeling and playing with the concept) had a whole essay about it bundled in the game. I was way too young to really grasp the game without blatantly cheating (which feels like a worrying allegory), but I really remember the essay, along with SimCity's hidden essays on urban design and the character of cities. I'm trying to think if any video game since the Sim series has had a similar connection to an academic discipline.

  20. Feb 2017
  21. Dec 2016
    1. But she argues that, when it comes to machine design, it’s not exactly about giving people what they do or do not want. What matters, Schüll says, is ‘the accentuating, accelerating and elaborating that happens between the wanting and the giving’.
  22. Oct 2016
    1. One of the moments for me as an individual is realising that maybe the most interesting thing about games is not the “games” part; it’s the way that they allow an excuse for setting up and respecting these arbitrary limitations, and working with them.

      this is great! Can you see and reply to this?

  23. Sep 2016
    1. Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc., 2K and Firaxis Games Partner with GlassLab Inc., to Bring CivilizationEDU to High Schools Throughout North America in 2017
  24. Jul 2016
    1. obedience of volunteers

      A few years ago, the experiment was remade into a tv gameshow. And, according to a documentary on it, was even more effective.

  25. Jun 2016
    1. Title: What is it? An oral history of Izzy, the mascot marketing snafu of Olympic proportions - Atlanta Magazine

      Keywords: fantastic mascot—cobi, public appearances—, bob cohn, atlanta-based artist, york city, billy wanted, spanish art, children thought, vice president, senior director, blue blob, acog spokesperson, billy looked, easy character, olympic city, olympic games, olympic bid, question billy

      Summary: <br>Bob Cohn, cofounder of public relations agency Cohn & Wolfe, member of Payne’s mascot committee: In Barcelona in 1992, they had a fantastic mascot—Cobi, who was typical of Spanish art and filled with creativity.<br>Some of them wrote us back letters [that essentially said] “The nerve!” or “We’re not doing anything for nothing.”<br>So it couldn’t be characters that existed in Georgia lore.<br>Somebody sent us a deer.<br>John Ryan, then senior director at DESIGNefx, the animation division of Crawford Communications: The basic job was to design something that would appeal to children and broadly on a world stage.<br>Photograph by Rich Mahan/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP<br>It wore five Olympic rings—two on its eyes and three on its tail—and oversized sneakers nearly half the size of its body.<br>Bob Brennan, then ACOG spokesperson: Billy Payne wanted to do something modern, reflective of the technological world we lived in.<br>You had movies like Jurassic Park, Total Recall.<br>Shuman: I received Hi-Rez right at the deadline, a Friday.<br>When Billy looked at that [proposal], he said, “Gee whiz, wow.<br>Payne: As CEO of the Olympic Games, I felt it was both our responsibility and within my authority to make whatever decisions needed to be made.<br>Shuman: By the time I got back on Monday afternoon, Ginger told me Billy had made his decision.<br>Were we raising enough money?<br>Shuman: You didn’t question Billy.<br>Payne: The logical question that you would ask on seeing it is “What is it?” I guess we just said, “Well, we should just put it into one word.”<br>Shuman: The name, Whatizit, was almost worse than the character itself.<br>Does it all run together?<br>Ryan: We had to have [final] designs submitted by March [1992], knowing it’d be debuted in August at the Barcelona Games.<br>It really looked funky.<br>In a huge stadium it can’t be little.<br>Shuman: To generate interest about the mascot, we did these billboards all over town saying, “Whatizit?” We built up this huge anticipation.<br>Ryan: It was made very clear that if secrecy was violated, Crawford could lose future contracts.<br>Photograph courtesy of Harry Shurman<br>Meanwhile an amorphous animated character filled the stadium’s video monitors.<br>Evans: I took the field with Gregg Burge, the famous New York [tap] dancer.<br>Joel Babbit, CEO of the Narrative Content Group, veteran ad exec who worked with Payne to promote the Olympic bid, and City Hall’s first-ever chief marketing and communications officer under Jackson: If Maynard had an opinion, he kept it to himself.<br>“How do you say ‘Whatizit’ in Mandarin?”<br>Like, this is it?<br>Completely and totally horrified.<br>They’re complaining: This is terrible.<br>But [ACOG] had a lot riding on the mascot financially from license sales.<br>Robert Hollander, then ACOG’s vice president of licensing: My heart dropped into my stomach.<br>Hula: It’s something that’s supposed to evoke an image of Atlanta, the host city, and it really didn’t do that at all.<br>We didn’t even think we were compelled to do something that would make somebody in Australia say, “That mascot must be from Atlanta, Georgia.” It never crossed our minds.<br>It was sort of like a bigger Charlotte.<br>Photograph courtesy of R. Land<br>Ronnie Land, an Atlanta-based artist, better known as R. Land, who has made Izzy-inspired art: This was our “Hey, world, we’re Atlanta” moment.<br>LaTara Smith (née Bullock), ACOG’s “project coordinator for Izzy appearances” during the Olympics: I’ve heard everything from toothpaste to blue blob.<br>Hiskey: People were going to focus on the crazy blue thing because there wasn’t a lot of other cool stuff here.<br>Bob Hope, president of Atlanta-based public relations firm Hope-Beckham Inc.: I thought [Billy] briefly lost his mind.<br>Kevin Sack, a New York Times reporter based in Atlanta, wrote in a 1996 story that “[i]t is precisely Izzy’s nothingness that has unwittingly made him an apt symbol for this Olympic city.<br>Whatizit’s costume made Mike Luckovich’s punchline.<br>People were embarrassed [by Whatizit].<br>You wish people would look at the good stuff instead of focusing on the minutiae and losing the big picture.<br>Campbell: I suspect I hurt some people’s feelings.<br>Photograph by Raymond McCrea Jones<br>ACOG officially retired Whatizit in October 1993.<br>It worked.<br>Babbit: I liked the name Izzy.<br>Jacqueline Blum, senior vice president of Film Roman, the animation studio behind The Simpsons, King of the Hill, and Garfield and Friends, which produced an Izzy cartoon for TV: Izzy was a character created by committee.<br>Ryan: You got into a scenario where you have multiple art directors and bosses.<br>Hope: [Izzy was] like New Coke.<br>Smith: Izzy developed a nose.<br>Shuman: We had these stars coming out of his tail at one point.<br>I raised my hand and said, “Maybe not?” They left the shoes the way they are.<br>The costume had to get softer.<br>Evans: Children loved the mascot.<br>I’d guess probably close to 15 percent.<br>Watkins: I’m guessing [the bestselling item] would be the doll that was 12 inches that could be carried under a kid’s arm.<br>Lounge chair pillows.<br>Shuman: Billy wanted to market the shoes.<br>Blum: It’s not a particularly easy character to animate.<br>Hollander: Our broadcast partner, NBC, had gotten out of the children’s program business.<br>Watkins: They created an Izzy balloon that flew in New York City in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.<br>Photograph by Caroline C. Kilgore<br>Evans helped create a mascot program that recruited volunteers through auditions.<br>Smith: By the time the Olympics came around, we had upwards of 20 Izzys that could be in different places at one time.<br>I asked [Izzy], “How does one become the mascot?” They were having tryouts the next weekend.<br>Don’t exclude children.<br>For example, Izzy loved everyone, so whether it was a critic or a fan, you didn’t show any negative emotion.<br>Izzy had a size 22 sneaker, so you had to fit your shoe inside Izzy’s shoe, inside another little pocket, and be able to walk around in his big feet.<br>Jay: You entered through the top of his mouth.<br>Smith: A lot of children thought it would be fun to swing on the tail.<br>Evans: The lighting bolt eyebrows and rings on the tail were prime targets for being pulled, punched, or ripped off for a souvenir.<br>Smith: Handlers began watching the perimeter.<br>Photograph courtesy of Harry Shuman<br>Is he still waiting for a shuttle bus?<br>Smith: We took over one of the Olympic headquarters offices.<br>Other times it would be outside as a crowd-pleaser.<br>Jay: We were instructed to wear the Izzy costume 30 minutes on, 30 minutes off, because you would sweat.<br>Wilsterman: There were two fans at the top of Izzy’s head [inside the costume].<br>I was able to whisper into a little microphone that went into the escort’s ear.<br>Smith: Izzy didn’t talk.<br>Izzy didn’t do public appearances—only [ones for] ticketed sponsors.<br>Brennan: I don’t think Izzy showed up at the closing ceremony.<br>Jay: When the flame went out, so did Izzy.<br>The question came up: Can someone dress up in the Izzy costume to greet visitors in the Atlanta History Center?<br>Photograph courtesy of LaTara Smith<br>Smith: I still have one of the Izzy costumes.<br>Payne: People didn’t like it.<br>I never lost my enthusiasm for Izzy.<br>Was it the greatest experience of my life?<br>Evans: I do appreciate the originality and willingness to do something different.<br>Land: Atlanta tries so hard to be what we think the world wants to view us as.<br>Shuman: Izzy was kind of like Colony Square—a little bit before his time.<br>Smith: It would’ve been easier to have a phoenix.<br>It didn’t say anything.<br>Babbit: It doesn’t matter what it was.<br>It was bizarre.<br>An image of Izzy?<br>Shuman: Usually everything Billy touched turned to gold.<br>This article originally appeared in our July 2016 issue.<br>Tags: 1996 Atlanta Olympics, 1996 Olympics, Atlanta Olympics, Billy Payne, Izzy, John Ryan, Olympics, R. Land, Whatizit<br>

  26. Apr 2016
    1. window dressing

      @sorcha on twitter https://twitter.com/_sorcha/status/654787074273316864 writes: "I'm not convinced by your dismissal of 'window dressing' when the mimetic experience of historical games is such a big draw"

  27. Nov 2015
    1. Only four years old, Twitch already has 100 million viewers who consume 20 billion minutes of gaming every month. According to one 2014 study, Twitch is the fourth-­most-­visited site on the Internet during peak traffic periods, after Netflix, Google and Apple and above Facebook and Amazon. (Amazon bought Twitch in 2014 for about $1 billion, all of it cash.) And there is money in it for the gamers themselves, called ‘‘streamers’’: Fans can subscribe to channels for extra access, or they can send donations of any amount. Streamers with modest followings can make respectable incomes — hundreds or thousands of dollars a month — and the very top streamers are getting rich.

      (This is entirely peripheral to the subject of the article. I am making note of it because I have barely heard of Twitch until recently.)

    1. As adults have increasingly thwarted self-initiated play and games, we have lost important markers of the stages in a child’s development. In the absence of such markers, it is difficult to determine what is appropriate and not appropriate for children. We run the risk of pushing them into certain activities before they are ready, or stunting the development of important intellectual, social, or emotional skills.  For example, it is only after the age of six or seven that children will spontaneously participate in games with rules, because it is only at that age that they are fully able to understand and follow rules.
  28. Oct 2015
    1. He began writing a program to make it play draughts (checkers), inspired by a June 1950 article in Penguin Science News.

      It's not insignificant that Strachey began by creating a game before his experiences with combinatory literature. I think that the poetics of the game are an intrinsic part of digital literature. I think it's useful to use Espen Aarseths' terminology of "user" in place of "reader" in order for one to talk about "games" and "books" in the same breath.

    1. In my research, we filmed an interaction between a couple and had each partner turn a rating dial as they watched their tape afterward. On this graph (at left), you can see how one couple rated their interaction. The blue dots represent the wife’s ratings over 15 minutes of conversation; the red dots represent the husband’s ratings. When you add them together, these ratings are a constant, which means that in this interaction, her gain is his loss and his gain is her loss. This is what’s called in game theory a “zero-sum game.” You’ve probably all heard of the concept. It’s the idea that in an interaction, there’s a winner and a loser. And by looking at ratings like this, I came to define a “betrayal metric”: It’s the extent to which an interaction is a zero-sum game, where your partner’s gain is your loss. On the other hand, by trust we really mean, mathematically, that our partner’s behavior is acting to increase our rating dial. Even though we’re disagreeing, my wife is thinking about my welfare, my best interests. When we scientifically tested these so-called trust and betrayal metrics, we found that a high trust metric is correlated with very positive outcomes, such as greater stability in the relationship. In a 20-year longitudinal study of couples in the San Francisco Bay Area that I recently completed with UC Berkeley psychologist Bob Levenson, we found that about 11 percent of couples had a zero-sum game pattern, like in that graph. Every six years, we would re-contact all of the couples in the study, and they would come back to Bob’s lab at Berkeley. Yet we noticed that many of the zero-sum couples weren’t coming back. I thought maybe they dropped out because they found the whole thing so unpleasant. Well, it turns out that they didn’t drop out. They died.
    2. Interestingly, the investors’ expectations about the back-transfer from the trustee did not differ between the oxytocin and placebo recipients. Oxytocin increased the participants’ willingness to trust others, but it did not make them more optimistic about another person’s trustworthiness.

      The Trust Game; however, there was no difference in groups when the trustee was a computer, showing oxytocin affects social connections but not risk-behavior itself.

    3. Conventional economic theory maintains that people will always behave in a purely self-interested manner. According to this worldview, it makes no sense to trust, whether in a trust game or in real life, as any trust will be exploited. The trustee will always keep her entire windfall for herself, so the investor would be better off not transferring any money in the first place. And yet when researchers like Joyce Berg and others have had people play the trust game with real monetary stakes, they have repeatedly found that the average investor will transfer half of her initial endowment and receive similar amounts in return. Through the trust game, researchers have also discovered a number of factors that seem to drive levels of trust. Familiarity breeds trust—players tend to trust each other more with each new game. So does introducing punishments for untrustworthy behavior, or even just reminding players of their obligations to each other.
  29. Sep 2015
    1. But in a digital world, how do we connect ourselves and our children to what were once oral traditions? Hollywood has accomplished some of these tasks. The recent screen version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings brought us a classic story that is based on the epic tradition. Yet how many of us have stopped and talked with our children about the deeper meanings of this tale? As the sophistication of video gaming grows, can the power of this entertainment form be used to educate children about the pitfalls of following a herd mentality? Could these games help children develop their own internal compass in morally ambiguous situations? Or perhaps even help them think about their own ability to act heroically? And as we plow ahead in the digital era, how can the fundamental teachings of a code of honor remain relevant to human interactions?
    1. BushmanandAnderson and others have marshalled a lot of evidence looking at the experimental effectsof playing violent video games, and not only does it tend to increase aggression (althoughthat finding is a little bit controversial right now), but just as importantly, kind ofsaturatingyourself in these violent images and these violent games what it definitely does is itreducesyour cooperative, kind tendencies. So be wary of, or be mindful of, these violent,saturatedplaces of our culture.
  30. Aug 2015
    1. Your party’s inventory doesn’t even have a button assigned to it — it’s accessed by flipping your device to portrait mode, a clever trick that I expect other games to rip off before long.

      This was bugging the crap out of me. If this was mentioned in any tutorial or guide in the game I totally missed it. It is, however, a pretty good mechanism.

  31. Jul 2015
    1. Excessive use of computer games among young people in China appears to be taking an alarming turn and may have particular relevance for American parents whose children spend many hours a day focused on electronic screens. The documentary “Web Junkie,” to be shown next Monday on PBS, highlights the tragic effects on teenagers who become hooked on video games, playing for dozens of hours at a time often without breaks to eat, sleep or even use the bathroom. Many come to view the real world as fake.
  32. Feb 2015
  33. Oct 2013
    1. PlayStation C.A.M.P. — the same team behind last year's quirky Tokyo Jungle — examines another offbeat topic for its latest project: What if you were invisible and could only see yourself or be seen by others when standing in the rain?

      Such a great idea. I was stoked to see this at E3!

    1. For Foddy, QWOP was designed as a critique of the classic arcade game Track & Field. Foddy always looks to the games of his childhood when developing his own works rather than his more recent philosophy studies.

      Interesting to rely on life experiences vs. Philosophy background.