613 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
  2. Jul 2022
    1. instead of inlining the images, the image URL’s (and captions) are read from a .yaml file. The URL of the yaml file is passed as an argument when loading the page. The .yaml file as well as the images should be publicly served.
    1. It really only takes one head scratching issue to suck up all the time it saves you over a year, and in my experience these head scratchers happen much more often than once a year. So in that sense it's not worth it, and the first time I run into an issue with it, I disable it completely.
    1. Stop autoclosing of PRs While the idea of cleaning up the the PRs list by nudging reviewers with the stale message and closing PRs that didn't got a review in time cloud work for the maintainers, in practice it discourages contributors to submit contributions. Keeping PRs open and not providing feedback also doesn't help with contributors motivation, so while I'm disabling this feature of the bot we still need to come up with a process that will help us to keep the number of PRs in check, but celebrate the work contributors already did instead of ignoring it, or dismissing in the form of a "stale" alerts, and automatically closing PRs.

      Yes!! Thank you!!

      typo: cloud work -> could work

    1. I don't understand why it should be so hard to keep issues open / reopen them. That's just going to cause people to open a duplicate issue/PR — or (if they notice in time) cause people to add extra "not stale" noise when the bot warns it's about to be closed. Wouldn't it be preferable to keep the discussion together in one place instead of spreading across duplicate issues? (Similarly, moving the meta conversation about an issue out to a completely separate system (Discord) seems like the wrong direction, because it wouldn't be visible to/discoverable by those arriving at the closed issue.) I get how it's useful to have stale issues not cluttering the list. But if interes/activity later picks up again, then "stale" is no longer accurate and its status should be automatically updated to reflect its newfound freshness... like it did back here:
  3. Jun 2022
    1. Now all I had learned on my travelsFell into a new kind of placeEven maths and hard sciencesNo longer at oddsWith Art or HumanityBut serving to showA side of the storyInsufficient to stand on its own

      The great Zen teacher Daisetz Suzuki said upon his Satori experience: "The elbow does not bend backwards".

  4. May 2022
    1. "I didn't fully understand it at the time, but throughout my time as a freshman at Boston College I've realized that I have the power to alter myself for the better and broaden my perspective on life. For most of my high school experience, I was holding to antiquated thoughts that had an impact on the majority of my daily interactions. Throughout my life, growing up as a single child has affected the way am in social interactions. This was evident in high school class discussions, as I did not yet have the confidence to be talkative and participate even up until the spring term of my senior year."

    2. "Specifically, when one of my classmates stated how he was struggling with the concept and another one of my classmates took the initiative to clarify it, I realized that that individual possibilities vary greatly among students."

    3. "The need to engage with people in terms of evaluating them for the aim of acquiring a different point of view was one occasion this semester where the knowledge I received in class positively changed the way I approached an issue. I was patient enough to explore other perspectives, some of which disagreed with mine, so that I might learn about their opinions without bias or prejudice."

    1. build a browser that comes pre-installed with node.js

      Nah. Just stop programming directly against NodeJS to start with!

      The Web platform is a multi-vendor standardized effort involving broad agreement to implement a set of common interfaces. NodeJS is a single implementation of a set of APIs that seemed good (to the NodeJS developers) at the time, and that could change whenever the NodeJS project decides it makes sense to.

      (Projects like WebRun which try to provide a shim to let people continue to program against NodeJS's APIs but run the result in the browser is a fool's errand. Incredibly tempting, but definitely the wrong way to go about tackling the problem.)

  5. Apr 2022
    1. The DICER1 syndrome is an autosomal dominant tumor‐predisposi-tion disorder associated with pleuropulmonary blastoma, a rare pediatric lung cancer

      GeneName:DICER1 PMID (PubMed ID): PMCID: PMC6418698 PMID: 30672147 HGNCID: NOT LISTED<br /> Inheritance Pattern: Autosomal Dominant Disease Entity: Cancer; benign and malignant tumors including pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, multinodular goiter, Thryoid cancer, rhabdomyosarcoma, and pineoblastoma. Mutation: Somatic missense variation Mutation type: missense Zygosity: None stated Variant: unregistered…. Family Information: Characterize germline variants in familial early-onset clorectal cancer patients; The observation of germline DICER1 variation with uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma merits additional investigation. CasePresentingHPOs: uterine and rectal cancers in germline mutation

  6. Mar 2022
    1. I believe this is partly due to a militant position on free software. Some advocates believe so strongly that users should be able to recompile their software that they force them to do so. They break libraries seemingly on purpose just to say, “Recompile! Oh you can’t? That’ll teach you to use binary software!” Of course users don’t want to recompile their software, but what users actually want is usually lost on GNOME developers.
    2. They claim that they deduplicate runtimes. I question how much can really be shared between different branches when everything is recompiled. How much has /usr changed between releases of Ubuntu? I would guess just about all of it.
    1. Note that this is a breaking API change in the libraries (more information in the README.md). It does not affect the backwards compatibility of the protocol itself.

      annotation meta: may need new tag: backwards compatibility of the protocol backwards compatibility for [libraries that use [it?]]

  7. Feb 2022
    1. Hence an email address/mailbox/addr-spec is "local-part@domain"; "local-part" is composed of one or more of 'word' and periods; "word" can be an "atom" which can include anything except "specials", control characters or blank/space; and specials (the *only* printable ASCII characters [other than space, if you call space "printable"] *excluded* from being a valid "local-part") are: ()<>@,;:\".[] Therefore by the official standard for email on the internet, the plus sign is as much a legal character in the local-part of an email address as "a" or "_" or "-" or most any other symbol you see on the main part of a standard keyboard.
    2. "+" is a completely valid character in an email address; as defined by the internet messaging standard published in 1982(!) RFC 822 (page 8 & 9)... Any website claiming anything else is wrong by definition, plus they are prohibiting me and many fellow anti-spam activists from tracking where inbound spam comes from:
    1. I used Publii for my blog, but it was very constraining in terms of its styling

      This is a common enough feeling (not about Publii, specifically; just the general concern for flexibility and control in static site generators), but when you pull back and think in terms of normalcy and import, it's another example of how most of what you read on the internet is written by insane people.

      Almost no one submitting a paper for an assignment or to a conference cares about styling the way that the users of static site generators (or other web content publishing pipelines) do. Almost no one sending an email worries about that sort of thing, either. (The people sending emails who do care a lot about it are usually doing email campaigns, and not normal people carrying out normal correspondence.) No one publishing a comment in the thread here—or a comment or post to Reddit—cares about these things like this, nor does anyone care as much when they're posting on Facebook.

      Somehow, though, when it comes to personal Web sites, including blogs, it's MySpace all over again. Visual accoutrement gets pushed to the foreground, with emphasis on the form of expression itself, often with little relative care for the actual content (e.g. whether they're actually expressing anything interesting, or whether they're being held back from expressing something worthwhile by these meta-concerns that wouldn't even register if happening over a different medium).

      When it comes to the Web, most instances of concern for the visual aesthetic of one's own work are distractions. It might even be prudent to consider those concerns to be a trap.

    1. As the only way to find outif something is worth reading is by reading it (even just bits of it), itmakes sense to use the time spent in the best possible way. Weconstantly encounter interesting ideas along the way and only afraction of them are useful for the particular paper we started readingit for. Why let them go to waste? Make a note and add it to your slip-box. It improves it. Every idea adds to what can become a criticalmass that turns a mere collection of ideas into an idea-generator.

      Even if the paper or book you're reading doesn't answer the particular question you're researching, you're bound to come across other novel ideas and potential questions. Don't let these go to waste, but instead note them down and save them into your note taking system. They may be useful in the future, particularly if you found them interesting or intriguing.

      It turns out "waste not, want not" is applicable to ideas as well.


      I can't help but also thinking "waste note, want note" as an interesting turn of expression.

  8. Jan 2022
    1. That's like the example i wrote, and i think it's very ugly. It's annoying when frameworks are very elegant in demos and presentations but then that elegance disappear when you have to write real world code.
    1. Seems easy, right? How about the below code, what will it print? new Promise((_, reject) => reject(new Error('woops'))). catch(error => { console.log('caught', err.message); }); It'll print out an unhandled rejection warning. Notice that err is not defined!
  9. Dec 2021
  10. Nov 2021
    1. This is actively being worked on - for those interested you can follow the progress in https://github.com/snapcore/snapd/pull/10836
    2. Seeing how this has been treated for 4.5 years makes this seem like a pretty dysfunctional project. Please have mercy on your poor users and fix this.
    3. After 5 years there's still no fix. This is so annoying. I'm now getting rid of all snap packages and installing deb variants instead. Finally I'll purge snap and if these weird decisions keep on going I'll also move to another distro. Common Canonical. Seriously?
  11. Oct 2021
    1. that is not ideal, since for example 'Cookie' is a forbidden header name, so I have to start worrying about env in load, which is kind of contra to its design.
    1. Arguments for “it depends.”

      Exploratory research - descriptive -- light instrumentation Confirmatory study - use well structured Multiple case - standardization will help to cross compare.

      See Figure 2.7

  12. Sep 2021
    1. I find Alt + right-click + drag to be the most convenient way to do this.

      On PopOS, the default seems to be Super + right click drag

      Took me some research to try to figure it out though (because on the Ubuntu system I came from, it was Super + middle click drag). I wish it were a bit more discoverable.

    1. The classic SPA example is a to-do list. But, you know what? I don't like to-do lists. They make me think about all the things I have to do, many of which I don't want to do.So why don't we make a To-Don't List app? That way we can list all the things we're not going to do. Ever.
    1. From my point of view, this approach will help you to write cleaner code. Also, it will help to maintain the project. For instance, moving a file from the current directory to another will cause fewer problems, because every file uses an absolute path instead of a relative one. Last but not least, it helps you during development.
    1. Let's not get over-excited. Actually, we're only part-way there; you can compile this code with the TypeScript compiler.... But is that enough?I bundle my TypeScript with ts-loader and webpack. If I try and use my new exciting import statement above with my build system then disappointment is in my future. webpack will be all like "import whuuuuuuuut?"You see, webpack doesn't know what we told the TypeScript compiler in the tsconfig.json.
    1. I am not going to do Webpack support. I’ve been pretty lenient in the past and answered most Webpack support questions, but it takes a lot of my time that I could have spent on more important things. I will instead refer users to the Webpack support channels.
    1. ⚠ Node Sass does not work with Yarn PnP feature and doesn't support @use rule.
    1. The Rails server will also compile your assets if the dev server is not running, but this is much slower vs running separate processes and not recommended.
    1. But it is always important to remember that those are not language concepts. Those are community concepts that only exist in our heads and in the names of some library methods.

      I'm not sure about this. I get what he's saying and agree that singleton methods are nothing but a naming convention for the more fundamental/atomic construct called instance methods (which indeed are the only kind of method that exist in Ruby, depending how you look at it), but I think I would actually say that singleton methods are language concepts because those methods like Object#define_singleton_method, ... are always available in Ruby (without needing to require a standard library first, for example). In other words, I would argue that something belonging in the Ruby core "library" (?) by definition makes it part of the language -- even if it in turn builds on even lower-level Ruby language features/constructs.

    2. Note: when I wrote above that "there is no such thing as X", what I meant was that "there is no such thing as X in the Ruby language". That does not mean that those concepts don't exist in the Ruby community.
    3. The question is similar but its in a Rails context. The solutions would answer my question, but I'm almost certain that he could probably leverage Arel to solve his problem. The question I posted was designed purely as a Ruby question so that it was easier to search for. You might want to suggest an edit of the title of his question because it didn't show up when I searched for a solution to my problem.
    4. Yes, unfortunately the other question has a misleading and completely irrelevant Rails context and might be harder to find for some people. IMHO, it's still a perfect content duplicate, although not a topic one. Answers are also equal. Anyways, still a good question of yours.
  13. Aug 2021
    1. Always use the word ‘Africa’ or ‘Darkness’ or ‘Safari’ in your title.

      I love the style in which this is written. While it appears to be a "how-to" guide, the author is doing nothing more than addressing the stereotypes that surround Africa. Turning this piece into a " how NOT to " guide.

    1. historicalknowledge is foundational to beingable to understand ourselves as humans.

      Interesting! (Note: This does NOT count as an action.)

    2. In every case, Psychol-ogy as a modern scientific discipline producesknowledge that changes the individuals, soci-eties, and cultures in which it is embedded, andthese changes then feed back into psychologicaltheory and practice.

      Oh! I am interested in seeing how this unfolds throughout the semester. (Note: This does NOT count as an action.)

    1. “We need to find ways to meet our customers’ needs and ambitions of reducing emissions to remain relevant for them.

      Énergir can, and should, meet their customers' needs by helping them to end their use of gas and by accelerating a managed decapitalization of their existing gas assets. Énergir should "Pump Heat, Not Gas." By this I mean, they should refocus as a "thermal-utility," rather than as a gas-supplier and build a new business focused on the installation of heat pumps and the provision of geothermal district heating for their customers.

    1. 3. The no-keyword-arguments syntax (**nil) is introduced You can use **nil in a method definition to explicitly mark the method accepts no keyword arguments. Calling such methods with keyword arguments will result in an ArgumentError. (This is actually a new feature, not an incompatibility)
  14. Jul 2021
    1. Please note that the strategy: :build option must be passed to an explicit call to association, and cannot be used with implicit associations:
    1. Rails' inability to automatically route my link_to and form_for in STI subclasses to the superclass is a constant source of frustration to me. +1 for fixing this bug.

      I've had to work around this by doing record.as(BaseClass)

  15. Jun 2021
    1. Dependencies are hoisted, meaning they get installed in the root node_modules folder. This is done for performance reasons: if a dependency is shared by multiple packages, it gets saved only once in the root.
    1. Do not use aria-orientation attribute for standard list (i.e., role="list"), use component's vertical property to set the orientation to vertical.
    1. I don't think it is too clever. I think it solves the problem idiomatically. I.e., it uses reduce, which is exactly correct. Programmers should be encouraged to understand what is correct, why it is correct, and then propagate. For a trivial operation like average, true, one doesn't need to be "clever". But by understanding what "reduce" is for a trivial case, one can then start applying it to much more complex problems. upvote.
    1. Users who have installed it decided to trust me, and I'm not comfortable transferring that trust to someone else on their behalf. However, if you'd like to fork it, feel free.

      Interesting decision... Seems like the project could have been handed off to new maintainers instead of just a dead-end abandoned project and little chance of anyone using it for new projects now.

      Sure you can fork it, but without a clear indication of which of the many forks in the network graph to trust, I doubt few will take the (massively) extra time to evaluate all options and choose an existing fork as a "leader" (or create their own fork) to go with continuing maintenance...

  16. May 2021
    1. Preserving history; we often find ourselves using the git blame tool to discover why a certain change was made.
    2. Preserving commit hashes; we use commit hashes in binary names and our issue tracker; ideally, these references remain intact.
    1. Note that not all of the colors in SMUI read from CSS variables, so some parts will still use the colors defined in the original Sass compile.
    1. In the earlier example, I used “no-reply@” because this is, unfortunately, a common practice used by many email marketers. As a brand utilizing email, you should never expect a personal experience like email to ever be one-sided.
  17. Apr 2021
    1. There's nothing to stop you from doing initializer code in a file that lives in app/models. for example class MyClass def self.run_me_when_the_class_is_loaded end end MyClass.run_me_when_the_class_is_loaded MyClass.run_me... will run when the class is loaded .... which is what we want, right? Not sure if its the Rails way.... but its extremely straightforward, and does not depend on the shifting winds of Rails.

      does not depend on the shifting winds of Rails.

    1. The other papers found no correlations between clinical symptom improvement and changes in connectivity (Abbott et al., 2013; Li et al., 2013; Posner et al., 201

      No clinical change to Connectivity correlation

    1. (Ideally the run-time library would treat a pipe in the same way as a console, but it seems that most don't.)

      Often/usually treating a pipe/redirect differently is in fact what you want.

      Like if you output to a file, you don't necessarily want colors or real-time progress/status outputted along with it: you want just the bare data to be saved, which can then be filtered in useful ways with other standard tools like grep and sed.

    1. Dry humor is a delivery technique. As such, it shouldn't be confused with specific types of humor or with sarcasm. Sarcasm is delivered without humor because it's generally not funny but intended to mock or convey contempt. Dry humor pertains to something funny.
    1. Of course you must not use plain-text passwords and place them directly into scripts. You even must not use telnet protocol at all. And avoid ftp, too. I needn’t say why you should use ssh, instead, need I? And you also must not plug your fingers into 220 voltage AC-output. Telnet was chosen for examples as less harmless alternative, because it’s getting rare in real life, but it can show all basic functions of expect-like tools, even abilities to send passwords. BUT, you can use “Expect and Co” to do other things, I just show the direction.