300 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. That's what's supported, and is all that is EVER likely to be supported... and even then be DAMNED sure you send multipart with a plaintext copy or a great many mail servers will flat out reject it on the assumption that no legitimate e-mail has any damned business even having HTML in it in the first place!
  2. Apr 2021
    1. There's nothing to stop you from doing initializer code in a file that lives in app/models. for example class MyClass def self.run_me_when_the_class_is_loaded end end MyClass.run_me_when_the_class_is_loaded MyClass.run_me... will run when the class is loaded .... which is what we want, right? Not sure if its the Rails way.... but its extremely straightforward, and does not depend on the shifting winds of Rails.

      does not depend on the shifting winds of Rails.

    1. Games that aren't really like rogue, but tagged roguelike. Lite on rogue elements, they should be tagged as roguelite or genre_roguelike instead. For more info, check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roguelike
    1. Neither question nor answer appears to understand the notion of semantic HTML. Height and width are presentational attributes regardless of where you put them. For semantics we establish what the image means to content in the alt tag. I don't remember why it was so important to width/height in the HTML but I suspect it was in case you hit browsers without CSS rendering. It's not a semantics issue. If anything it thwarts separation of concerns to a degree.

      claim: that the OP's question and this answer are incorrect

      Could we say that this answer (that this comment replies to) missed the point?

      I actually believed and thought this answer was spot on ... until I read this comment, and then I reversed my opinion.

    1. Programming is using a language that a machine can understand in order to get it to perform various tasks. Computer programming is how we communicate with machines in a way that makes them function how we need.
    2. Earning a computer programming degree can help you innovate and create solutions for a global society.

      Can talk about how this applies to other areas/problem-solving/impact on world.

    1. However, it can be extremely frustrating placing the tiles. Very commonly there will be no position to place a tile in and it will be put to one side. Perhaps someone new to tile-laying games wouldn't find this so odd, but to anyone with experience of Carcassonne it will seem very limiting. In Carcassonne you can pretty much always place a tile, with several choices of position available. Every player I've introduced this game to has looked at me as if to say, "We must be doing something wrong." But no, that game is designed that way. Sometimes it feels like the map builds itself - there is often only one viable placement, so it starts to feel like a jigsaw, searching for that available position. Surely placing a single tile shouldn't be this difficult!

      I don't think I'd find it frustrating. I think I would enjoy the puzzle part of it.

      But indirectly I see that difficulty in placing tiles impacting my enjoyment: because it means that there are no/few meaningful decisions to be had in terms of where to place your tile (because there's often only 1 place you can put it, and it may sometimes benefit your opponent more than yourself) or which tile to place (because you don't get any choice -- unless you can't play the first one, and then you can play a previously unplayable one or draw blind).

    1. Fatum Betula is, arguably, a nearly perfect video game, depending upon your philosophy when it comes to criticism. If you, like me, believe that to a large extent the success of a game depends upon how well it achieved what it set out to do, I think you can get very far with such an argument.
  3. Mar 2021
    1. Your validation functions should also treat undefined and '' as the same. This is not too difficult since both undefined and '' are falsy in javascript. So a "required" validation rule would just be error = value ? undefined : 'Required'.
    1. As to why both is_a? and kind_of? exist: I suppose it's part of Ruby's design philosophy. Python would say there should only be one way to do something; Ruby often has synonymous methods so you can use the one that sounds better. It's a matter of preference.
    1. ReconfigBehSci. ‘RT @ashishkjha: Over Past Week We Got 11.4 Million Doses into Arms 5.6 Million Were 1st Doses 5.8 Million Were 2nd Doses That’s a Proble…’. Tweet. @SciBeh (blog), 1 March 2021. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1366421544495382533.

  4. Feb 2021
    1. “We’ve moved away from the whole ethic of what was industrial capitalism.”

      Defend this argument in 2021 America.<br> Refute this argument in 2021 America.<br> Contemplate the genesis behind this argument Share opinion regarding this argument.

  5. www.metacritic.com www.metacritic.com
    1. Please, do not buy this. I am really tired of "games" that are given critical praise because its cool to praise or because its political correct to do. I will break up my review in points so its clear why I dislike this "game" : 1) This is not a game. This is a short story, like an interactive book. 2) This game is so short, that I completed it in a 3 hour bus ride. It was boring. 3) Its a story of a girl that have to take the reigns of her life after divorce. WOMAN EMPOWERMENT. Now you know why this game is rated so highly 4) This is a MOBILE GAME. I paid $3 to play on an iphone (after watching a gaming channel give it GOTY contender. Needless to say, I never watched that gaming channel again). I FELT I WAS ROBBED OF TIME AND $3. Imagine how much I hated this game to feel like I was robbed even though it costed me only $3. 5) This game costs $7 on the eshop. You could buy CELESTE for $9 on sale on the Eshop. That is a great game. I recently bought Hollow Knight for $7 on Playstation. This interactive novel should not be sold as a game. Period. It is a waste of time and money.

      Nothing wrong with interactive novels being sold in the same store as games... as long as it's clear what it is (no false advertising).

      Somewhat agree with some of the other points...

    1. with ActiveForm-Rails, validations is the responsability of the form and not of the models. There is no need to synchronize errors from the form to the models and vice versa.

      But if you intend to save to a model after the form validates, then you can't escape the models' validations:

      either you check that the models pass their own validations ahead of time (like I want to do, and I think @mattheworiordan was wanting to do), or you have to accept that one of the following outcomes is possible/inevitable if the models' own validations fail:

      1. if you use object.save then it may silently fail to save
      2. if you use object.save then it will fail to save and raise an error

      Are either of those outcomes acceptable to you? To me, they seem not to be. Hence we must also check for / handle the models' validations. Hence we need a way to aggregate errors from both the form object (context-specific validations) and from the models (unconditional/invariant validations that should always be checked by the model), and present them to the user.

      What do you guys find to be the best way to accomplish that?

      I am interested to know what best practices you use / still use today after all these years. I keep finding myself running into this same problem/need, which is how I ended up looking for what the current options are for form objects today...

    1. ensure that the vital process of verification and trust in science is maintained to a high standard

      This conclusion is focusing on the statements above, which I personally do not consider to be accurate.

    2. to be sustainable this is a decision that needs to be applied at the level of individual journals, not through blanket policies

      It's my interpretation that the funders agree which is why Wellcome Trust wrote to publishers asking if they would change their policies to reflect the rights retention strategy.

    3. the Rights Retention Strategy is not financially sustainable

      So far as I know this is not tested or based on any evidence. If the publishers think an open accepted manuscript would undermine the version of record, it doesn't demonstrate much confidence in their added value to me.

    4. The Rights Retention Strategy provides a challenge to the vital income that is necessary to fund the resources, time, and effort to provide not only the many checks, corrections, and editorial inputs required but also the management and support of a rigorous peer review process

      This is an untested statement and does not take into account the perspectives of those contributing to the publishers' revenue. The Rights Retention Strategy (RRS) relies on the author's accepted manuscript (AAM) and for an AAM to exist and to have the added value from peer-review a Version of Record (VoR) must exist. Libraries recognise this fundamental principle and continue to subscribe to individual journals of merit and support lucrative deals with publishers. From some (not all) librarians' and possibly funders' perspectives these statements could undermine any mutual respect.

    1. The work goes best when you draw on participants' own personal experiences, not their opinions. Opinions invite argumentation. Telling about experience invites listening. Opinions tend to bring on conflict, whereas shared experiences tend to elicit curiosity and empathy. When participants move from experiential testimony to opinion, bring them back, knowing that most schooling discourages testimony.

      exeriences >> opinions

    1. Popup - You don't need to deal with these messages right away, yet at some point you will need to take action since these won't go away until explicitly say say you don't want them around anymore.
  6. Jan 2021
    1. However, one of the drawbacks of this property is that the line intersects descenders of the characters.

      I think it actually looks great/better because it intersects descenders of the characters.

    1. In my opinion, it can sometimes look odd. Very interestingly, this is by design and is part of the Material design specification. This article isn’t to argue whether it should be this way or not, though; it’s just to change yours such that your MenuItem(s) show below the menu selection, like so:
    1. When there are imperfections, we rely on users and our active community to tell us how the software is not working correctly, so we can fix it. The way we do that, and have done for 15 years now, is via bug reports. Discussion is great, but detailed bug reports are better for letting developers know what’s wrong.
  7. Dec 2020
  8. Nov 2020
    1. This definition is actually a strict subset of the first definition: as the same script must (by definition) run inside both a server/Node.js context, but also a browser DOM context
    1. Text links are a very simple button type.

      Eh? I didn't know links were considered buttons. I'm not sure I totally agree understand, but it's not outrageous either...

      Update: Okay, I guess when you put an outline around it (like they directly below this paragraph), and even more if you put an icon with it (like they did further down; https://hyp.is/DZTZzi6fEeuu65uvQJ9W1Q/uxdesign.cc/ui-cheat-sheets-buttons-7329ed9d6112), the link looks like more like a button.

      But (and I think this is their point) it is what it is because of how it's used and not how it's styled: it should be the same thing (a button) whether or not it has an outline.

    1. About auto-close bots... I can appreciate the need for issue grooming, but surely there must a better way about it than letting an issue or PR's fate be semi-permanently decided and auto-closed by an unknowing bot. Should I be periodically pushing up no-op commits or adding useless "bump" comments in order to keep that from happening? I know the maintainers are busy people, and that it can take a long time to work through and review 100s of open issues and PRs, so out of respect to them, I was just taking a "be patient; they'll get to it when they get to it" approach. Sometimes an issue is not so much "stale" as it is unnoticed, forgotten about, or consciously deferred for later. So if anything, after a certain length of time, if a maintainer still hasn't reviewed/merged/accepted/rejected a pull request, then perhaps it should instead be auto-bumped, put on top of the queue, to remind them that they (preferably a human) still need to review it and make a decision about its fate... :)
  9. Oct 2020
    1. Please don't copy answers to multiple questions; this is the same as your answer to a similar question

      Why on earth not? There's nothing wrong with reusing the same answer if it can work for multiple questions. That's called being efficient. It would be stupid to write a new answer from scratch when you already have one that can work very well and fits the question very well.

    1. Without elegant ways of expressing loops/iterators (like angular does with directives), the primary way to keep JSX readable thus becomes copying and pasting.

      I'm not quite sure I understand this (so until I do, I'm not sure I agree)...

      Why does he think copying and pasting is the only way to make it readable? Like he pointed out, you can extract JSX snippets and use loops within JSX. But maybe he means (his previous point), that people often don't do that. Hmm. 

    2. I have a few colleagues that converted to hyperscript, and while they were adverse at first, they were satisfied with having switched once they had become comfortable with the way it looks/reads.
    1. discourse-time

      In a lot of the movies I have seen, the discourse-time order is very interesting to me. It is interesting to see what happens in the end, in the beginning and vice-versa. Some people might see it as giving away the story first, but I think you're able to connect with the character more than you would in a realistic-time.

  10. Sep 2020
    1. Actually just returning the loginDaoCall works fine. I dont really get what's different as it is the looked like it was the same instance, but probably not.

      So the posted answer wasn't necessary/correct? Which part of the answer was incorrect/unneeded?

      I wish this OP comment included the full version of code that worked.

      I don't understand this OP comment. Wasn't OP already returning loginDaoCall? So maybe the only thing they could mean is that they just needed to change it to return loginDaoCall.then(...) instead...

      That would be consistent with what the answer said:

      the promise returned by the further .then() does also get rejected and was not handled.

      So I guess the unnecessary part of the answer was adding the return true/false...

    1. This is a framework and it comes with certain opinions about how things should be done, this isn't unique to Svelte. And before we can decide whether or not we will allow certain behaviour or encourage it with better ergonomics, we have to have a conversation about whether or not we should be doing things that way. You can't separate the can from the should in an opinionated framework. We want to make building UIs simpler, for sure, but also safer we don't want to add ease of use at the expense of component encapsulation, there has to be a balance
    2. If you want this control then wrap them in a DOM node that the parent controls. If you want to pass in values then use props and if you want to pass in values from higher up the tree, the new style RFC may be able to help.
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: “having spent a few days looking at ‘debate’ about COVID policy on lay twitter (not the conspiracy stuff, just the ‘we should all be Sweden’ discussions), the single most jarring (and worrying) thing I noticed is that posters seem completely undeterred by self contradiction 1/3” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved September 23, 2020, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1308340430170456064