178 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2020
    1. As Shannon Larratt is interviewing Stalking Cat, he brings up a point that's quite interesting to me, and entirely relevant to the idea of privacy and unwanted celebrity we discussed earlier in this course.

      SL: "... uh you do- you do go to a fair number of tattoo conventions, and you must experience at least a minor celebrity status while you're there."

      SC: "Well, you know, in fact, I've only been to a couple conventions-"

      SL: "I guess- I guess it's just every one you go to, they will always photo you."

      SC: "Right, and my pictures have been plastered all over the place, and uh, it, in a way kind of irritates me, because these people're making money off of something I've spent a great deal of time doing, and I haven't gotten a dime out of it."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "But uh, and uh, and they're basically using my picture to get themselves famous."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "Or to get publicised."

      SL: "Yeah."

      SC: "But again, I did this for me, not for other people."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      There's also been a positive side to this, as it encouraged self-expression amongst the public, and while not exactly normalising it, it allowed people who needed to do stuff like this to accept it and go for it. (But not those who are doing it as a trend.)

  3. Jun 2020
    1. This means you no longer have to declare inverse_of on two associations which have good names.

      ... which have good names.

      This implies that those names where the inverse_of cannot automatically be inferred are bad names. I disagree that a "good name" is at all related/dependent on that ability.

      What they should say here instead is:

      ... which have names that allow the relationship to be easily inferred.

      Or refer to these names as the "default" or "Rails conventional" names for these associations.

      But it is not necessarily a better name. A better name is, quite often, one that is more descriptive and specific.

      For example, just because by default if you use rails generate with a User model, it might (I don't remember; can it even generate associations?) create a belongs_to :user association doesn't mean that's the best name for it. belongs_to :author or belongs_to :owner, for example, being more specific, are likely better names. The model still needs a generic name like User because it may be used in various relationships, but the relationships themselves should pretty much never be called user because there's almost always a more specific name that better reveals/describes the relationship.

    1. Un planteamiento semejante impulsa a tener en cuenta la posibilidad de consecuencias imprevistas, a hacer explí-citos los aspectos normativos que se esconden en las decisiones técnicas, a reconocer la necesidad de puntos de vista plurales y aprendizaje colectivo

      Esta idea está relacionada con la referencia a la novela Hyperión, la inteligencia artificial que determinó que para seguir evolucionando necesitaba un par que lo confrontara en debate.

    1. I know you acknowledged your response was late and you're just trying to help but please don't resurrect very old threads.

      This is better than creating a duplicate new thread.

      There is no better place to respond to an existing topic than in the existing thread for that topic.

    1. This is a poor solution

      What's so bad about this solution? If it works, it works. And it only requires wrapping in 1 additional block. Pretty simple.

  4. May 2020
    1. Because the conditional connectives thus complicate the formal reasoning about programs, they are better avoided.
    1. A real-world example of this would be an e-commerce site that allows users to “hold” items in their cart while they’re using the site or for the duration of a session. In this scenario, the technical cookies are both necessary for the functioning of the purchasing service and are explicitly requested by the user when they indicate that they would like to add the item to the cart. Do note, however, that these session-based technical cookies are not tracking cookies.

      I'm not sure I agree with this:

      [the technical cookies] are explicitly requested by the user when they indicate that they would like to add the item to the cart.

      The only thing they requested was that the item be held in a cart for them. They didn't explicitly request that cookies be used to store information about items in the cart. They most likely don't understand all of the options for how to store data like this, and certainly wouldn't know or expect specifically that cookies be used for this.

      In fact, localStorage could be used instead. If it's a single-page app, then even that would be necessary; it could all be kept in page-local variables until they checked out (all on the same page); such that reloading the page would cause the cart data held in those variables to be lost.

    1. Motion Picture Association of America Chairman Chris Dodd stated that the coordinated shutdown was "an abuse of power given the freedoms these companies enjoy in the marketplace today."

      It's not an abuse of power. It's free speech. It's protesting against an awful proposed law.

  5. Apr 2020
    1. Ces enquêtes mettent en évidence que les individus se sentent peu motivés au travail

      Cheminement de l'auteur - étape 3 : nous passons notre temps dans des bureau et leur aménagement a un impact fort sur nous mais nous sommes très peu motivés. Et implicitement, l'auteur nous suggère que notre faible motivation est due uniquement au manque de plaisir. Citation de Gallup et Ipsos - argument rhétorique.

      Ce qui nous laisse sur notre faim ici est le raccourci entre le manque de motivation et le marché du meuble. L'auteur nous laisse penser que l’aménagement de notre espace est le seul vecteur pour améliorer notre motivation. Or il serait intéressant de le mettre en perspective ce levier parmi d'autres.

      Question de réflexion pour moi : lien entre motivation et plaisir d'apprendre

    1. there's no reasonable way to communicate effectively with the less technically minded without acquiescing to the nontechnical misuse of the term "hacker"
    2. The more easily relabeled of the two uses of the term "hacker" is the malicious security cracker: it is not only the more recent phenomenon to acquire that label, but also the one whose meaning is most easily evoked by an alternative term. This is why, when you read an article of mine that talks about malicious security crackers, I use the term "malicious security cracker"
    1. Now, if we think of the tasks that we perform throughout the day as consuming separate "bands" of time, then the term makes perfect sense. Being "out of bandwidth" would indicate that you do not have enough unallocated "bands of time" in your day to complete the task. Using the term bandwidth to describe time maps more closely (in my opinion) to the original definition, than the current definition describing data capacity does.
    1. For instance, if an IP address is sent with an ad request (which will be the case with almost any ad request as a consequence of internet protocols), that transmission will not breach any prohibition on sending PII to Google.
    2. Google interprets PII to exclude, for example: pseudonymous cookie IDs pseudonymous advertising IDs IP addresses
    3. data excluded from Google's interpretation of PII may still be considered personal data under the GDPR
  6. Mar 2020
    1. Instead of re-opening Ruby classes like that (I get involuntary twitches), for our little exercise we are going to invent another name

      IMHO, re-opening classes is okay. Certainly better than duplicating an entire core Ruby class and giving it a silly, less-meaningful name. (Though I'm not sure he actually intended people to use Lax instead of Lazy. I think he was just showing how easy it is to implement Lazy from scratch in Ruby.)

    1. After discussion with Xiao, I believe the tetramer hypothesis of TAZ-TEAD is not correct. Reasons:

      1. There are two TAZ-TEAD binding modes in the structure, 5gn0. And one is similar to the canonical YAP-TEAD structure, albeit TAZ has shorter loop between the alpha helix and omega loop.
      2. the CoIP result just shows that TAZ can form homodimer, which is induced by its coiled-coil segment. And such coiled-coil segament is far from the TEAD binding domain.

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  7. Jan 2020
    1. It’s therefore more accurate to describe a thumb as one of five digits that we have on each hand, rather than as a finger.
  8. Dec 2019
    1. Having to have open class discussions is one of the most effective tools of learning as it forces you to engage and ask questions about the theme or question presented. In addition, it opens you up to listening to other people’s opinions and thinking from different perspectives.
  9. Oct 2019
    1. Mr Booth often uses his newspaper to rail against climate change

      Oh good one - I can't believe you're only a work experience student - there's a bunch of people at the SMH who are highly-paid and you at least match them for mediocrity. Yes, the climate change mention should well and truly stir the juices of your readers and that's always preferable to the trend towards falling asleep mid-article. Do you think there should be a law against newspaper proprietors voicing their opinions because it never ever happens? (NOTE: And I know what you're thinking. Imagine having views and opinion that stray from a collective decision on what to believe - it would be such a hassle)

    1. Each of our core emotions had a distinct signalling role in our evolutionary past:

      I like this clause, it sums up why moving past privacy and that fear of being watched is outdated and needs to literally be taken out of our biology.

    2. external environment

      we should stop trying to fuck with the environment to improve our quality of life, rather engage in self improvement and advancement with the tech. knowledge we posses and making that work for us rather than sell it for entertainment or other forms of gratification that ultimately perpetuate suffering.

  10. Sep 2019
    1. A “Veillance Contract,” for example, would deny the surveillant the right to use its recordings as evidence if it doesn’t allow others the right to make their own recordings.

      I like this idea

    2. After the shooting, the police seized the four recordings of the event and reported that all were blank, even though transit officials had already viewed the shooting.

      Well, surveillance will always be corrupted in a state that has institutionalized police and that mechanism of power, to reinforce the ideologies of the bousougie who design the socialization, views and perceived liberty/freedom.

    3. Is there not a conflict-of-interest inherent in one party being the curators of the recordings they make of highly contested disputes with other parties?

      not in the case of true augmentation.

    4. So, while it may be easy to claim you don’t like being watched, it is sometimes the case that you actually want someone watching over you.

      Could that be said for all people though? Is this sense of security only to make a certain group feel safe, none the less the people watching and the question of who's watching them. In my experience, only white people gain any type of comfort from this..

    1. Abstract

      Abstract is a sales pitch and a guide; the authors summarize their entire paper into less than 100~200 words to draw you in and guide you throughout the rest of the paper.

      This is a literature review on the relationship between the public opinion and foreign policy. The American public is, largely, regarded as uninterested and unaware of foreign policy. However, here the authors survey the literature and conclude that the public is able to hold a nuanced and coherent view on foreign policy and is able to make a voting decision based on this view.

  11. May 2019
    1. Avoid importing online Anki decks. Similar to note taking, your own materials have better retention and comprehension.

      I would definitely import relevant online Language decks filled with tons of glossaries on foreign languages i.e other's years of hard work, but yeah, I would not import others' programming/science notes/cards/decks for sure. ✌🏽

  12. Dec 2018
  13. gutenberg.net.au gutenberg.net.au
    1. sir

      Mr. Heywood has a point regarding resort areas. Connecting this to modern day resorts, when these things pop up, the prices of everyday things are inflated. This results in the residents of the area not being able to afford to live there and become impoverished.

    2. see his partner.

      Does this refer to a surgeon's assistant?

    3. For objections

      Charlotte is surprised that Lady Denham's objections to having more people stay at her home are not based in her affection and duty toward Miss Clara, but because she doesn't want to pay her housemaids for doing the extra work involved.

    4. poor Mr. Hollis

      Lady Denham obviously favored her second husband over her first, even though Mr. Hollis left her with an inheritance, which is much more useful than a title.

    5. Mr. Arthur Parker

      Mr. Arthur Parker seems interested in the Miss Beauforts as earlier he thought a short walk to Trafalgar to be a lot of exercise, but he is willing to do a bit more to see the ladies. He is one of several single men in Sanditon and he is likely a contender to be a part of a marriage plot. This is assuming that, like all of Austen's other novels, Sanditon contains a marriage plot.

    6. unfavourably

      The question is why Charlotte should view the meeting between Sir Edward and Miss Clara Brereton as bad for the latter. Is it because Charlotte already formed an unfavourable opinion of Sir Edward as being a lover of Miss Clara's while talking "nonsense" to Charlotte in order to annoy Clara and appear an admirer of hers too? Charlotte finds Sir Edward tiring and may think he is, despite his title, beneath Clara. However, Charlotte does note that Clara's poverty makes her acceptance of Sir Edward's attentions more understandable. If so, then Austen is acknowledging the need for women to consider economic benefits to marriage, while also possibly giving her support to the idea of love in marriage.

    7. having her distress

      Camilla (1796) by Frances Burney, a popular romanticist novel. In Camilla, the titular character has many misadventures concerning love and relationships. This reference could either be a funny nod or light foreshadowing. Source).

    8. devotion to Clara

      When considering class distinctions, it will be interesting to see how this relationship will play out.

    9. Charlotte

      It is strange that Charlotte is accompanying the Parkers when her own parents only just met them. This plot point is similar to the moment that Catherine Morland stays with the Tilneys, even though her family doesn't know them at all.

    10. already

      I personally find it odd that the gentleman (who notably has not yet been named) has no reaction to his sprained ankle and is able to speak so eloquently through the pain.

      An article about Regency treatment for fractured bones:

      https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/2010/10/08/setting-a-broken-bone-19th-century-medical-treatment-was-not-for-sissies/

    11. impropriety

      Miss Diana Parker's request to ask Lady Denham for money for various people that she does not know from a woman she likely does not know very well seems very impolite. Also, considering how little Lady Denham likes to part with her money, Diana's comments would be particularly provoking.

    12. remove suspicion

      This suspicion is in reference to Lady Denham thinking Charlotte has a desire to pursue Sir Edward, or that Charlotte may be misinterpreting Sir Edward's behaviour towards her believing he is forming an attachment to her. Lady Denham clearly wants to convey the message that Sir Edward is not available.

    13. an additional burden

      This sentence is particularly cruel towards Clara, and represents a shift through free indiret discourse from the narrator's perspective to the perspectives of one of the characters. However, it is difficult to determine whether or not the opinion is that of Lady Denham or Mr. Parker.

    14. Charlotte listened

      This chapter is extremely unusual. It's been almost entirely exposition, but now we're tossed back into a scene in which Charlotte is listening.

    15. Links to common words/themes throughout the annotations

  14. Nov 2018
    1. “My first exposure to hospital medicine was through Drs. Chris Landrigan and Vinny Chiang as an intern in Boston. I was impressed by their clinical mastery and teaching. I then did my first research project with Chris, which led to a publication in Pediatrics. I had previously thought about intensive care or emergency medicine for fellowship, but I was excited about the general nature, growth opportunity, and ability to drive health system change in hospital medicine. I think that growth and ability to drive health system change in hospital medicine has grown exponentially since I finished residency, so the field has more than lived up to its potential and has more room to grow in terms of impact.”

      Patrick Conway

    2. “I’ve been continually surprised at the growth of the field and SHM. My view has evolved from ‘Is this for real?’ to ‘How can hospital medicine make healthcare better for patients on a broad scale?’ The latter view has gone through iterations. We witnessed HM make hospitals more efficient, then we saw hospitalists drive safer, less harmful care. Most recently, hospitalists are embarking on deep change through alternative payment models like bundled payments. In terms of SHM, we endeavored to keep a ‘big tent’ since the many flavors of hospitalists all are united by a deep conviction to make hospitals safer, kinder, and higher-functioning places for the people inhabiting them—patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals. I’m humbled and gratified that we have been able to keep SHM a viable home for all hospitalists after 20 years.”

      Win Whitcomb

    3. “I think the future of hospitalists is actually outside of the hospital and helping to keep patients healthy. Hospitalists are really good at taking care of the most sick, complex patients who are at the highest risk of healthcare utilization. While hospitalists predominantly do this for patients in the hospital, hospitalists are starting to play a larger role in post-acute care and trying to target interventions to improve health for high-risk patients. Not surprisingly, we are starting to see extensivist models, including Comprehensive Care Physicians, grow out of existing hospitalist groups.”

      Vineet Arora

    4. “As I was finishing my residency in the mid 1990s, I told folks I wanted to find a job ‘only doing inpatient medicine.’ People laughed at me. Within five years, hospitalist medicine was developing on the East Coast, and people were no longer laughing. … Hospitalists will be at the center of this brave new world [of episodic care] since they assist in the liaising between patient, PCP, specialist, and acute-care provider. It is incumbent upon us to help explain things in a manner easily understood by the patient and to be committed to high-quality care with an eye for value and cost containment.”

      Jill Slater Waldman

    5. “The hospitalist movement has been a remarkable success. I heard of it from my friend Bob Wachter and since then have learned much from him and many others. … Hospitalists have and will continue to play a key role in improving patient safety, quality, patient experience, value, and healthcare equity. SHM has taken a leadership role to help ensure hospitalists have the skills and resources to do this.”

      Peter Pronovost

    6. “The emergence of the field of hospital medicine has been one of the most important developments for quality of care in hospitals over the past 20 years. Taking full advantage of this opportunity will require the field to broaden its focus from one that primarily emphasizes the care of patients while they are hospitalized to one that encompasses patients’ full trajectories through the continuum of care. To realize their full potential as quality improvement leaders, hospitalists will need to position themselves as experts in health system quality and safety. Specifically, they will need to take ownership of the vital processes of effectively communicating across transitions of care.”

      Mark Chassin

  15. Sep 2018
  16. Jul 2018