46 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
  2. May 2021
    1. CommonJS has served us well for many years, but ESM comes with many benefits, like language-level syntax, browser support, defaults to strict mode, async loading, top-level await, improved static analysis & tree-shaking, and more.
  3. Apr 2021
    1. Lumberjack 1.0 had a concept of a unit of work id that could be used to tie log messages together. This has been replaced by tags. There is still an implementation of Lumberjack.unit_of_work, but it is just a wrapper on the tag implementation.
    1. Factory FunNER is the sequel and a very solid improvement to Factory Fun. It uses hexes instead of squares to allow more creative building, and some subtle improvements to scoring, length, and machine placement rules really improve things.
    1. Now that we’ve gotten newer layout features — again, like grid and flexbox — floats, too, have sort of fallen by the wayside, perhaps either because there are better ways to accomplish what they do
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. That’s it. If you have a previous “precompile” array, in your app config, it will continue to work. For continuity sake I recommend moving over those declarations to your manifest.js file so that it will be consistent.
    2. Instead of having this confusing maze of lambdas, regexes, and strings, we could, in theory, introduce a single entry point of configuration for Sprockets to use, and in that file declare all assets we wanted to compile. Well, that’s exactly what the manifest.js file is.
    1. You’re allowed to blame us for a terrible developer experience in Trailblazer 2.0. It’s been quite painful to find out which step caused an exception. However, don’t look back in anger! We’ve spent a lot of time on working out a beautiful way for both tracing and debugging Trailblazer activities in 2.1.
    1. The activity gem is an extraction from Trailblazer 2.0, where we only had operations. Operations expose a linear flow which goes into one direction, only. While this was a massive improvement over messily nested code, we soon decided it’s cool being able to model non-linear flows. This is why activities are the major concept since Trailblazer 2.1.
    1. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
    1. Yes, Trailblazer is adding new abstractions and concepts and they are different to the 90s-Ruby, but now, at the latest, it becomes obvious how this improves the developing process. We’re no longer talking in two-dimensional method stack traces or byebug hoops, the language and conception is changing to the actual higher level code flow, to activities sitting in activities structured into smaller step units.
    2. We removed the trailblazer-loader gem just like Apple removed the headphone jack from the iPhone 6. This brings you faster startup and consistency with Rails autoloading.
    1. ActiveInteraction plays nicely with Rails. You can use interactions to handle your business logic instead of models or controllers.
    2. Since we're using an interaction, we don't need strong parameters. The interaction will ignore any inputs that weren't defined by filters. So you can forget about params.require and params.permit because interactions handle that for you.
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website. This became painfully apparent when we noticed other people post OpenTTD on some stores. They are not always updated with new releases, sometimes even slacking behind a few years. And maybe more important to us: we can not guarantee that the uploaded version is unmodified and is the version as we intended. So, instead of fighting it, why not turn around and join them! Why not release our own, verified, builds on those stores! And this is exactly what we have been working on lately. And when I say “we”, a bit ironic to me, I mean the two developers that are around longest (myself and orudge) ;) A while back orudge added OpenTTD to the Microsoft Store. And today, I am happy to announce we will be on SteamE too! Well, we are on Steam, but we haven’t released anything there yet (sorry that I got your hopes up, just to squash them right after :( ). This is partially because of how Steam works, but also because we know we can bring a better experience for Steam with our upcoming release. That brings me to the most exciting news: if everything goes as planned, we will release OpenTTD 1.11 on Steam on the first of April, 2021! And that is not even an April fools’ joke! You can already Wishlist OpenTTD today .. and till we release on Steam, you can find our game via our website ;)
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website.
    1. Well, I'm glad they did, because Turbolinks is a much better piece of software than jquery-pjax ever was. It's actively maintained and doesn't require jQuery at all! So we're one step closer to our dream of ditching $.
  6. Dec 2020
  7. Nov 2020
    1. There was a major refactoring in the resolver (https://github.com/webpack/enhanced-resolve). This means the resolving option were changed too. Mostly simplification and changes that make it more unlikely to configure it incorrectly.
    1. {#key} was introduced in Svelte v3.28, before that you needed to use a keyed {#each} block with only one item When the key changes, svelte removes the component and adds a new one, therefor triggering the transition.
    1. Svelte's advantage here is that it indicates the need for an update at the place where the associated data is updated, instead of at each place the data is used. Then each template expression of reactive statement is able to check very quickly if it needs to rerender or not.
    2. Svelte slots are much easier to use and reason about than Angular transclude, especially in cases where you don't want an extra wrapper element around the slot content.
    1. If your Svelte components contain <style> tags, by default the compiler will add JavaScript that injects those styles into the page when the component is rendered. That's not ideal, because it adds weight to your JavaScript, prevents styles from being fetched in parallel with your code, and can even cause CSP violations. A better option is to extract the CSS into a separate file. Using the emitCss option as shown below would cause a virtual CSS file to be emitted for each Svelte component. The resulting file is then imported by the component, thus following the standard Webpack compilation flow.
  8. Oct 2020
    1. Instead of this, you can use a File type variable.
    2. Previously, a common pattern was to read the value of a CI variable, save it in a file, and then use that file in your script:
    1. Note how we have to duplicate the code between these two lifecycle methods in class. This is because in many cases we want to perform the same side effect regardless of whether the component just mounted, or if it has been updated. Conceptually, we want it to happen after every render — but React class components don’t have a method like this. We could extract a separate method but we would still have to call it in two places.
  9. Sep 2020
  10. Aug 2020
    1. For example, to search for text occurrences, I used ack-grep. Later on, I found that there is a faster approach using ag. Then, there is an even faster alternative called ripgrep.
  11. Jun 2020
  12. Mar 2020
    1. Q. Why does Rubinius not support frozen and tainted? A. Rubinius has better features; frozen and tainted are considered harmful. To elaborate... Both frozen and tainted depend on strewing checks throughout the source code. As a classic weak-link system, only one of those checks needs to be misplaced for the guarantees offered by either to fail. Since the number of checks is high, and as new code is written new checks need to be considered, the features inherently constitute unbounded complexity and unbounded risk.
  13. Dec 2019
    1. Just for the record newer versions of ssh support the -W option, you can do something like ProxyCommand ssh -W %h:%p gateway instead of depending on nc