10 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
    1. The simple problem that I see with fragment identifiers is that their existence and functionality relies completely on the developer rather than the browser. Yes, the browser needs to read and interpret the identifier and identify the matching fragment. But if the developer doesn’t include any id attributes in the HTML of the page, then there will be no identifiable fragments. Do you see why this is a problem? Whether the developer has coded identifiers into the HTML has nothing to do with whether or not the page actually has fragments. Virtually every web page has fragments. In fact, sectioning content as defined in the HTML5 spec implies as much. Every element on the page that can contain content can theoretically be categorized as a “fragment”.

      at the mercy of author

  2. Apr 2021
    1. Now VS Code's generic debugger UI supports all data breakpoint access types defined in the Debug Adapter Protocol as context menu actions in the VARIABLES view: Break on Value Read: breakpoint will be hit every time a variable gets read. Break on Value Change: breakpoint will be hit every time a variable gets changed (this action was previously available). Break on Value Access: breakpoint will be hit every time a variable is read or changed.
  3. Mar 2021
  4. Feb 2021
  5. Jan 2021
    1. Interesting . That feature (<slot slot="..."/>) was only recently added in #4295. It wasn't primarily intended to be used that way, but I guess it's a good workaround for this issue. I'm yet to find caveats to slotting components that way, other than it's inconvenient, as opposed to <Component slot="..."/>.
    1. Related to #1824, can do <svelte:component this={Bar}> <slot></slot> <slot name="header" slot="header"></slot> </svelte:component> <script> import Bar from './Bar.svelte'; </script> as a forwarding workaround
  6. Jun 2020
    1. What would be nice is if JavaScript had a built-in way to do what I can do in Ruby with:

      > I18n.interpolate('Hi, %{name}', name: 'Fred')
      => "Hi, Fred"
      

      But to be fair, I18n comes from i18n library, so JS could just as easily (and I'm sure does) have a library that does the same thing.

      Update: Actually, you can do this in plain Ruby (so why do we even need I18n.interpolate?):

      main > "Hi, %{name}" % {name: 'Fred'}
      => "Hi, Fred"
      
      main > ? String#%
      
      From: string.c (C Method):
      Owner: String
      Visibility: public
      Signature: %(arg1)
      Number of lines: 9
      
      Format---Uses str as a format specification, and returns the result
      of applying it to arg. If the format specification contains more than
      one substitution, then arg must be an Array or Hash
      containing the values to be substituted. See Kernel::sprintf for
      details of the format string.
      
         "%05d" % 123                              #=> "00123"
         "%-5s: %016x" % [ "ID", self.object_id ]  #=> "ID   : 00002b054ec93168"
         "foo = %{foo}" % { :foo => 'bar' }        #=> "foo = bar"
      

      I guess that built-in version is fine for simple cases. You only need to use I18n.translate if you need its more advanced features like I18n.config.missing_interpolation_argument_handler.