8 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. May 2018
    1. When asked to rate how important different features of their open textbook were to them, 70% of respondents rated "immediate access" as either "very important" or "absolutely essential." This was followed closely by "cost savings" (68%), and then convenience and portability of the digital format (54%), ability to print pages (41%), ability to keep it forever (37%), and ability to share it with others (34%; see Table 2).
  3. Feb 2018
    1. Mrs. Scales' Room

      Title of the Blog

    2. Out of Eden Walk Follow-Up

      Title of blog entry/post, author name and timestamp. The timestamp will be automatically generated when you create the post.

  4. Dec 2017
    1. I hope over time Reviz.in features will be integrated in the original client.

      Yes, I certainly hope so too. But what exactly are the additional features? I see the precautions for preventing accidental publication and the "Copy Review Report" button. (The renaming of annotations and page notes is perhaps not such an important "feature"...) Anything else?

  5. Nov 2017
    1. are visible only to other group members

      One thing I really like is that you can move annotations from one group into another (or into public). But it would be even better, if annotations could be shared with multiple groups. Because if I move the note from group A to group B, users who are a member of group A but not of group B will no longer see the annotation.

  6. Jul 2017
  7. Feb 2014
    1. Calibrated Peer Review™, Version 5 UCLA’s CPR is a stand-alone, web-based application that both manages the workflow for their specific peer review process and scores how well peer reviewers perform (see http:// cpr.molsci.ucla.edu). CPR allows large numbers of students to: • turn in essays, • learn what the instructor believes are the critical points in those essays by scor - ing instructor-provided essays with a multiple choice rubric, • perform peer review of their fellow students’ work, • perform a self-evaluation of their own work, and • receive all the feedback from their peers who reviewed their work.

      Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) allows large numbers of students to:

      • turn in essays
      • learn what the instructor believes are the critical points in those essays by scoring instructor-provided essays with a multiple choice rubric
      • perform peer review of their fellow students’ work
      • perform a self-evaluation of their own work
      • receive all the feedback from their peers who reviewed their work.